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Full text of "Our College Times"

ZUG MEMORIAL LIBRARY 
ELIZABETHTOWN COLLEGE 
ELIZABETHTOWN, PENNA. 



•Prtuate ICtbrarg 



LEWIS DAY ROSE 



Study to show thyself approved."— Paul 



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Also a Large Assortment of Comic Cards 

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A full line of Books, Stationery 
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Building Material 

PA I. NTS, ETC. 
before purchasing. Will be 
pleased to^uote on anything 
in the Hardware line. Edi- 
son Phonographs, Sporting 
Goods, Kodak supplies, etc. 

JEO. A. FISHER 

ELIZABETHTOWN, - PENNA. 



/. E. RELSER 

For Rooting, Spouting, Tin and 
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ators, Portable Furnaces, Granite 
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any special orders in my line. 
Give me a trial. 



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OUR COLLEGE TIMES 
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Prompt Delivery. 

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ELIZABETHTOWN, - PENNA. 



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CAKES 

Weddings and parties supplied 
with Fancy Cakes at short 
notice. South Market Street. 

ELIZABETHTOWN, - PENNA. 



Harry Miller 

Furniture & Undertaking 

Furniture Repairing & Upholstering 

Picture Framing 

Bell Phone 
Elizabethtown, - - Penna. 



G. II ' M. REISNEB 

Manufacturing Jeweler, Class and 
Fraternity Pins, Pennants, Banners 



Lancaster, 



Penna. 



An early start, a steady pace, 
Is our way to win the race. 
We would advise those who can, 
Adopt a system, work the plan. 
Modern methods, nowadays, 
Are commendable in many ways 

AT NISSLEY'S 
LUNCH AND DINING ROOMS 

14-16 E. Chestnut St., Lancaster, Pa. 



ELIZABETHTOWN COLLEGE FACULTY 



D. C. REBER, A. M. Pd. D., President 
Philosophy, Pedagogy, German. 

H. K. OBER, Pd. B., Vice President, 
Biological Science, Agriculture, 
Surveying. 

ELIZABETH MYER, M. E., 

Elocution and Grammer. 
B. F. WAMPLER, B. E., 

Director of Music, Voice Culture. 
FLORA GOOD WAMPLER, 

Piano, Organ, Harmony. 
J. G. MEYER, Pd. B., A. B., 

Mathematics, Physical Science, 

History. 

MARY E. MARKLEY, A. M., 

English, Latin and French. 

J. Z. HERR Prin. Commercial Dep't, 
Bookkeeping, Penmanship, Com- 
mercial Law. 



JACOB S. HARLEY, A. B., 

Geography, History and Civics. 

LYDIA STAUFFER, 
English Bible. 

LEAH M. SHEAFFER, Pd. B., 

Piano, Organ, Drawing, Physi- 
cal Culture. 

R. W. SCHLOSSER, Pd. B., 

Latin and Algebra. 
ELIZABETH KLINE, 

Piano, English Branches. 
ANNA W. WOLGEMUTH, 

Shorthand and Typewriting. 
DAISY P. RIDER, Pd. B., 

(Absent on Leave.) 
LAURA B. HESS, 

Sewing. 
ELD. S. H. HERTZLER, 

Exegesis (Bible Term). 



Contents 

Aim of Bible Study ....... g 

Alumni Notes ....... hi 

Department Work .-.----... 18 

Duties of Editorail Staff ...... 3 

Editorial ......... 3 

Educational Meeting of Opening Day .... g 

Elizabethtown College Opens ------ 3 

How a Student Should Spend His Sunday .... 4 

Literary ......... 6 

Locals - ....... 9 

Marriages - - - - - - - - - 11 

Religious Appointments ....... 16 

School News ........ s 

Society News - - - - - - - - 11 

Students Now Teaching ...... g 

The Death Angel 4 

The Lecture Course ....... 12 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 

Vol. VIII ELIZABETHOWN, PA., OCTOBER, 1910. No. 1 

EDITORIAL STAFF : 

ELIZABETH MYER, Editor-in-Chief 

HOLMES FALKENSTEIN, Associate Editor WALTER F. ESHLEMAN, Exchange 

LEAH M. SHEAFFER, Alumni News MAZIE MARTIN. Locals 

B. F. WALTZ, Society News GERTRUDE MILLER, Stenographer 

R. W. SCHLOSSER, Business Manager 



Our College Tim 



Report changes of address, .- 
Terms : Fifty cants per yea 
Entered at the Post Office a 



! this paper regularly. 



earages charged, 
> the Business Manager. 



EDITORIAL 

With the opening of the Fall Term 
Elizabethtown College enters her 
eleventh year, and Our College Times 
upon its seventh year. 

We come to you in a new dress and 
with some changes on our editorial 
staff. Miss L. Margaret Haas, now 
Mrs. Charles Sehwenk, is doing light 
housekeeping. She and her hus- 
band are both students at Bethany 
Bible School in Chicago. She will 
be succeeded by Holmes Palkenstein 
as proof-reader who is now preparing 
for classical work. 

Our Alumni Editor will tell you 
in another column the whereabouts 
of other members of the staff. 

Prof. M. A. Good, our former busi- 
ness manager, has returned to 
Bridgewater, his former home. He 
and Sister Good will both fill posi- 
tions in Bridgewater College. His 
place will be filled by Ralph W. 
Echlosser, who teaches Latin and 
Mathematics; and although he is a 
full member of the Faculty, he still 
pursues his work in the Classical 
Course at this place. 



Duties of Editorial Staff 

1. To secure as many new subscrib- 
ers as possible. Don't forget when 
your friends visit the College, or 
when you visit them, or write to 
them to ask them whether they are 
subscribers to "Our College Times." 

2. You should be on the lookout 
for news, marriages, deaths, appoint- 
ments of students to lucrative, or 
otherwise honorable or responsible 
positions. 

3. All articles for the November is- 
sue should be in the Editor's hands 
on or before the 14th of October, and 
likewise on each following month. 

4. Do your best and thus add to 
the success of "Our College Times" 
and of our College in general. 

5. All members of the Editorial 
Staff and every student in College 
should be interested in the College 
paper. Many of you have done 
nobly, and we feel grateful for your 
help. 

Elizabethtown College Opens 
(From the Phila. Inquirer.) 

Lancaster, Pa., Sept. 5. — The 
Elizabethtown College, at Elizabeth- 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



town, this county, opened its eleventh 
term today. Dr. D. C. Reber has 
been elected president of the faculty; 
H. K. Ober vice president, and J. Z. 
Herr treasurer. Prof. J. G. Meyer 
has been made professor of mathe- 
matics and physical sciences and 
curator of the museum, and Prof. 
Herr principal of the commercial de- 
partment. Prof. J. S. Harley, late 
of Leland Stanford University, will 
have the chair of History, and Mary 
E. Markley, of English and Latin. 
Prof. H. K. Ober will develop the 
Agricultural department. 

Yes, we are in existence only ten 
years (entering upon the eleventh) 
yet we are represented in many parts 
of the world: — Ira Myers and Do- 
mingo Dicit. in the Philippine Is- 
lands; Kathryn Ziegler and J. M. 
Pittenger, in India; W. K. Gish, in 
Alaska. 



The Death Angel. 

It is with deep regret that we note 
the death of Miss Ethel Reese, daugh- 
ter of S. G. Reese, of Elizabethtown. 
Ethel was a student here in 1905 
and '06 and by her modest manner 
and faithful work won for herself the 
admiration and friendship of both 
students and teachers. 

After leaving the College she en- 
tered a hospital in Norristown to 
take training as nurse and recently 
graduated, standing at the head of 
her class, and receiving a gold medal. 
She was employed as nurse at Block, 
ley Hospital, Philadelphia, where she 
contracted pneumonia which resulted 
in her death on August 3rd. Her 
remains were brought to Elizabeth- 
town for burial. It Is said that she 
bore her last illness and intense suf- 
fering with remarkable courage and 
resignation; and that she adorned 
her late profession with her good 
sense and womanliness. 



Our College Times extends to her 
bereaved friends its heart-felt sym- 
pathy in this hour of sorrow. 

Solicitor in the Field 

The Board of Trustees have ap- 
pointed Prof. H. K. Ober to be their 
financial representative. Prof. Ob- 
er will spend the first few days of 
each week in the field soliciting funds 
and students for the College. Dur- 
ing the Fall and Winter Terms, ho 
will teach at the College on Wednes- 
day, Thursday and Friday of each 
week. 

How a Student Should Spend His 
Sunday. 

All days of the week may be con- 
sidered equally important in so far 
as working out one's purpose in life 
is concerned. Longfellow in his 
poem, "The Builders", sets forth this 
idea when he says, — "Our Days and 
Yesterdays are the blocks with which 
we build." But since a student's 
work for weekdays is more specifical- 
ly mapped out for him than 
his Sunday duties are. and since the 
manner of spending his Sunday is 
largely in his own hands, we present 
these suggestions for consideration. 

First, the amount of, and nature of 
the rest taken on Saturday night will 
determine largely the student's capa- 
city for enjoyment and helpful in- 
fluence to others on Sunday. There- 
fore, the body. should not be abused 
by eating and drinking inteniperately 
on Saturday evening, nor should the 
functions of the brain be overtaxed 
to a late hour of the night. 

After a rest of eight hours, the 
student should rise at a reasonably 
early hour, — early enough to allow 
ample time to arrange bis toilet prop- 
erly and to kneel before Ills Maker 
in a season of thanksgiving and pray- 
er before going to his breakfast. 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



He should ask God's counsel to guide 
His power to uphold, His presence 
to cheer, and His Holy Spirit to sanc- 
tify him throughout the day. 

As to his toilet, his collar, his 
handkerchief, and all his linens 
should be immaculately clean, his 
clothes and shoes well brushed, so 
that his appearance be indicative of 
a pure, clean soul within. 

A light breakfast of wholesome 
diet should then be eaten with cheer- 
ful companions for it is said that 
chatted food is half digested. We 
know that good cheer is essential to 
good health and to personal in- 
fluence in the world. * 

After breakfast, he should take a 
walk of thirty minutes or more in 
the open air, breathing in the life- 
giving oxygen which our Creator sup- 
plies so bountifully for all his crea- 
tures. 

The next period of thirty minutes 
or more may be profitably spent in 
the study of the Sunday School les- 
son to be recited at 8.15 a. m. This 
is the Lord's day; and while it is true 
that the Scriptures should be read 
daily, many do not do so; and since 
our salvation depends upon living out 
the teachings of the Bible, since the 
Bible is the only source of fixed prin- 
ciples upon which it is safe to build 
character, surely we should study it 
on Sunday if on no other day. Every 
student knows that he feels interest- 
ed in any study in proportion as he 
gives attention to it. Perhaps few 
characters had their time more fully 
engrossed with business than Queen 
Elizabeth, of England; yet she is 
said to have found time to read the 
Scriptures daily and to have acquired 
a decided taste for them. She at 
one time said, "I walk many times 
in the pleasant fields of the Holy 
Scriptures, where I pluck goodlisome 
herbs of sentences by pruning, eat 
them by reading, digest them by 



musing, and lay them up at 
in the high seat of memory by gath- 
ering them together; so that having 
tested their sweetness, I may per- 
ceive the bitterness of life." All 
students, of course, should attend 
Sunday School where they may be in- 
structed in God's holy ways and 
where they may be given heart cul- 
ture which after all is of prime im- 
portance in a system of true educa- 
tion. 

The next hour should be spent in 
attendance at Church services, if at 
all convenient for him to do so. If 
not, he should read good books. 
Good books are a mighty force in 
the development of character. Let 
much of the student's spare time be 
spent in reading. All school text 
books should be laid aside on Sun- 
day, for the study of textbooks is 
our work during the week, and 
should we continue our daily, weekly 
routine of work on Sunday? Would 
not the farmer as well be justified 
in plowing, sowing and reaping on 
Sunday? Would not the saloon 
keeper and the merchant as well 
open their doors on Sunday? 

An invitation to dinner might be 
accepted occasionally provided the 
student's will power is strong enough 
to resist the tempation of eating 
more than the body requires and thus 
render himself incapable of perform- 
ing well his Sunday afternoon duties. 
After dinner, there should be no con- 
tinued conversation or boisterous 
conduct but all should repair to their 
rooms for a season of conversation, 
or of reading and meditation, or of 
rest. Some time should be spent in 
writing to dear friends, especially 
to the home folks. 

This suggests the Quiet Hour, a 
period of several hours in the after- 
noon when quiet should prevail 
everywhere inside and outside, up- 
stairs, downstairs, and on the cam- 
pus. 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



After supper, a half hour is spent 
in singing the good old songs and 
hymns will serve to strengthen the 
inner man and to blend heart to heart 
in school friendship and Christian 
fellowship. All who make a profes- 
sion of religion will do well to show 
their loyalty by being present and 
taking part in the Christian Workers' 
Meeting whenever it is possible to do 
so. A student's conduct through- 
out the Sunday should be in keeping 
with the sacredness of the day. 

In "The Students' Manual" may be 
found a number of resolutions which 
were made by a young man before 
he entered college, and which form- 
ed a character known and revered 
widely. A copy of this "Students' 
Manual" may be found in the K. L. 
S. library of Elizabethtown College. 

Students Now Teaching 

It is very gratifying to us to re- 
port so many of our students who 
are teaching in the public schools. 
Those teaching in Lancaster County 
are as follows: — West Donegal Twp. 
H. H. Nye, Rutts; Elizabeth Weaver, 
Pleasant Hill. Rapho Twp., Andrew 
Dixon, Newtown Secondary; Ella 
Young, Garfield; Agnes Ryan, Back 
Run; Howard Merkey, McKinley. 
Mt. Joy Twp., Ada Eshleman, Cherry 
Hill; C. L. Martin, Woodland; D. H. 
Hernley, Grandview; H. L. Ebersole, 
Milton Grove; Mamie Herr, Wheat- 
land; Effie Shank, Rockville; Mary 
Daveler, Bellaire; Anna Morning; 
Joint. 

York County: — A. G. Hottenstein, 
Shrewsbury. 

Dauphin County: — Wm. Chnist- 
man, Geyers; Miss Weidenhammer. 
Round Top; Anna Cannon, near 
Round Top; Xora Gruber, Deodate; 
Mary Gish, Witmer; Ray Gruber, 
Hertzler's. 

(Reported by MARY DAVELEri.) 
(Let us hear from others.) 



LITERARY 

Aim of Bible Study 

As we study the word of God — the 
most wonderful and precious gift to 
man — we recognize the depth and 
magnitude of its contents. Men led 
by the Holy Spirit have given years — 
their best years — yes, their lives, 
studying this wonderful gift to man, 
yet they have not fathomed its mys- 
teries. Its contents are divine, eter- 
nal, and can not be comprehended by 
the natural man, but can be known 
only by the Spiritual. 

This spiritual insight does not de- 
pend on intellect alone, but the hum- 
blest and most illiterate may receive 
these deeper spiritual gifts. God 
has hidden these Spiritual blessings 
from the "wise and wonder-standing 
and has revealed them to babes." 

All re-search in order to result in 
a blessing must be under the direc- 
tion of the Holy Spirit which guides 
into all truth. 

Many people read and study God's 
Word that they may criticise. On its 
pages instead of harmony and unity 
they see only contradictory and op- 
posing propositions. Their object 
is wholly to discover difficulties and 
since that is their aim in re-search 
they find only problems. They do 
not exercise their judgment and com- 
mon sense in studying the Bible as 
they do in common every day affairs. 
Dr. Moody at one time while eating 
dinner with a friend was asked by 
him "Dr. Moody, what do you do with 
the parts of the Bible you do not un- 
derstand"? He paused in his eat- 
ing, (he was just at that time eat- 
ing a fish) he replied "I do just as I 
am doing at this time — I eat the 
meat and lay the bones aside on my 
plate." So many do the oppo- 

site to that suggested by Dr. Moody— 
they search. for the bones — the pro- 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



blems and difficulties that they can 
not comprehend and cast aside the 
nourishing spiritual food. 

Some people study and read their 
Bible in order that they may say 
they have read it through once, twice 
or more times. Others read it from 
force of duty or habit. While even 
thus reading the Bible has its influ- 
ence on the life and is very commen- 
dable, yet the open-hearted, willing, 
consecrated student receives deeper 
Spiritual blessings. 

As we select any portion of Scrip- 
ture for study, we can not receive 
the full import of our subject until 
we h'ave carefully considered the set- 
ting. The context necessarily must 
be considered. The circumstances 
and surroundings play an important 
part in determining the interpreta- 
tion. Ascertaining all the facts and 
vivifying events and circumstances 
brings us into fuller realization of the 
situation. 

After acquainting ourselves with 
the facts of an event we next search 
for the principle taught in the event. 
The truth it contains becomes the 
nourishment for our Spiritual life. 
The consecrated, willing heart 
breathes the prayer for that prin- 
ciple to transform his character — 
that he may accept it and live it out 
in his own life. 

Knowing cold facts — even if they 
be Bible facts — is not enough. The 
under lying principle taught through 
these facts must be recognized and 
lived out in reality. For an exam- 
ple—the circumstance of Peter's im- 
prisonment. It is not enough to 
know how Herod imprisoned Peter, 
guarded him safely within the prison; 
that the united church was praying 
for his deliverance; that the Lord's 
Angel was dispatched and Peter safe- 
ly delivered to his brethren. These 
facts and conditions are given u« 
that through the event we may see 



the truth — the principle under-lying 
it all — that God is above even the 
highest Civil Authority, hears the 
prayers of his people and protects his 
own children. From the narrative 
we must recognize the truth taught 
in the event. Seeing the truth is 
not enough. For our spiritual 

growth we must receive it into our 
own life and experience God as the 
same power to-day. Only so far as 
we accept the doctrine, assimilate 
and build it into our own character 
and life, have we received the spiri- 
tual nourishment. This law of 
growth in our Spiritual life is as un- 
iversal as it is in our physical life. 
Every one will heartily agree that 
food for our natural man strength- 
ens only to the extent that it is di- 
gested, assimilated and built into the 
different tissues of the body. This 
is as true of Spiritual food as it is of 
the physical. 

That we may really experience and 
realize God in our own life, should 
be the aim in searching His Word. 
"Beyond the sacred page, we seek 
thee, Lord." We want not only 
theoretical, but the actual coming in 
contact with the real. James re- 
cognizes this when he says, "He that 
looketh into the perfect law — the 
law of liberty and so continueth, be- 
ing not a hearer that forgetteth but 
a doer, this man shall be blest in his 
doing." 

It is not enough to know our Bible 
intellectually. The Bible student 
may be able to recite most graphical- 
ly every circumstance and event in 
the life of Christ, yet if he fails to 
find the principles, character and vir- 
tue of that life, and fails to apply 
them to his own life by living them 
out, his study has not fully reached 
the highest ideal. The deeper bene- 
ficial part comes in the application 
to life. Until the truth in God'a 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



Word is built into virtuous character, 
the aim of Bible study has not been 
reached. Knowing God by un-mask- 
ing self of selfish human notions and 
in full surrender, allowing the Holy 
Spirit to so transform our life, that 
the world with which we come in 
contact, will know and feel that we- 
have "walked with God", is the high- 
est ideal in Bible Study. 

LYDIA STAUFFER. 



Prof. Ober was reading clerk at the 
Special District Meeting held at Ephrata 
Sept. 21st. Dr. Reber represented the 
Elizabethtown church as a delegate, at 
the same meeting. 



SCHOOL NEWS 

Night School 

A Night School for those desiring 
Commercial studies has been organ- 
ized, with Prof. J. Z. Herr and Miss 
Anna Wolgemuth as teachers. A 
number of ladies and gentlemen have 
enrolled, and more are expected lat- 
er. The studies pursued are those 
found in the Business Courses of the 
College. These classes are in ses- 
sion from seven to nine o'clock every 
Monday and Wednesday evening. 

Exchanges. 

At this issue of "Our College 
Times" but three of our exchanges 
have made their appearance. We 
trust the others will be in later. We 
acknowledge the following: "The 
Philomathean Monthly" for June, 
"Hebron Star" and "The Friendship 
Banner" for September. 

"The Philomathean Monthly," tho 
somewhat late in its arrival, deserves 
words of commendation for the at- 
tractive way in which the Senior 
number has been edited. The Sen- 
ior orations alone make the paper 
well worth preserving. 



"Surely this is a busy world, and 
he who is idle certainly cannot be 
sensitive of his opportunities and re- 
sponsibilities." — Hebron Star. 

WALTER ESHLEMAN. 

EDUCATIONAL MEETING ON 
OPENING SAY. 

(Taken from Elizabethtown Herald ) 

A large and appreciative audience 
gathered in the chapel at Elizabethtown 
College on Monday evening, Sept. 5, the 
beginning of the 11th year of this very 
prosperous educational institution. Quite 
a large number of students bad already 
arrived on College Hill for the Fall term 
and were present at the meeting. 

The educational meeting opened at 
7:30 p. in., with Prof. H. K. Ober as 
chairman. Rev. S. H. Hertzler read a 
scripture passage, after which he of- 
fered prayer. A mixed chorus then 
rendered a very fine selection. 

Prof. J. Z. Herr, who was one of the 
faculty of the college until a few years 
ago, has returned and has charge of the 
commercial department. Prof. Herr de- 
livered the opening address, using for 
his subject, "Beginning Life." A special 
feature of his address was the showing 
of how life is governed by starting right, 
and not neglecting the religious side of 
our education. 

Miss Anna Wolgemuth, who will assist 
Prof. Herr in the commercial depart- 
ment, entertained the audience very 
pleasantly with a recitation entitled, 
"Saved by a Boy." 

J. S. Harlev, a graduate of Lelaml 
Stanford, Jr., I'niversity, California, who 
will teach geography and history, read 
an interesting paper on "Appreciation." 
Miss Lydia Staull'er, who completed 
a course at the Bethany Bible School, 
Chicago, has charge of the Bible depart- 
ment Miss Stanffef read ii very inter- 
esting and instructive paper on "The 
Aim of Bible Study." 
A very able paper on "Thoroughness" 
was read by J. <i. Meyer, in which 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



he said the essentials for thoroughness 
are "self-reliance and perseverance." 
Prof. Myer is a graduate of Franklin 
and Marshall college, and will teach 
mathematics. 

The principal address of the evening 
was delivered by Rev. Dr. VV. A. Sher- 
wood of Lancaster. He spoke of the 
need of education and bow to attain it. 
Rev. Sherwood paid the college 
high compliments for the religious dis- 
cipline under which it is conducted. 

The music rendered during the even- 
ing was in charge of Prof. B. F. Wamp- 
ler. A male quartet and several mixed- 
choruses rendered selections, all of 
which were very much enjoyed by the 
entire audience. 

LOCALS 

College opened on Sept. 5th. 

The enrollment for the fall term 
is very encouraging. Prospects are 
bright for a number more. 

In the Faculty and Student body 
are represented the states of Penn- 
sylvania, Ohio, California, Virginia. 
West Virginia, Maryland and New 
York. 

Miss Markley is with us again. 
She reports having had a very pleas- 
ant trip. She will give a talk in 
Literary Society Sept. 30, concerning 
her experiences in Europe. 

Miss Mary Quinter, a returned mis- 
sionary from India, attended our 
Chapel exercises Friday morning, 
Sept. 9, and gave us a very inter- 
esting talk. 

The Library presents quite a dif- 
ferent appearance, new newspaper 
racks, and much shelving being add- 
ed. The ceiling and walls have 
been calcimined. 

The Literary So.uty was greatly 
honored on Friday evening, Sept. 9, 
when Mr. B. F. Waltz, one of its loy- 
al members, presented the portraits 
of three famous men, to be hung In 
the Society Hall. 



Evening Classes in Bookkeeping, 
Commercial Arithmetic, Penmanship, 
Shorthand, Typewriting and Rapid 
Reckoning have been organized un- 
der the direction of Prof. Herr. 

Prof. M. A. Good, who has return- 
ed to his former home in Virginia, 
after being steward of the College 
for several years is now succeeded 
by Prof. Jacob S. Harley a graduate 
of Leland Stanford University, Cal. 

Miss Stauffer and Prof. Meyer 
have been appointed to teach the 
Bible Classes regularly each Sunday 
morning. 

The College Branch of the Mis- 
sionary Reading Circle with Mr. 
Waltz as president and Miss Stauffer 
teacher, is endeavoring to inspire 
new zeal in missionary efforts by 
studying the lives of those who have 
stood boldly in the conflict on the 
Mission field. 

Sunday School Teachers' Train- 
ing Class has also been organized. 

The force of workers in the kit- 
chen now consists of the following: — ■ 
Mrs. Augusta Reber, as Matron, as- 
sisted by Miss Sallie Pfautz, Bare- 
vllle, Pa.; Miss Mabel Weaver, 
Brownstown, Pa.; Miss Orca Miller, 
Mechanicsburg, Pa.; Miss Mary 
Sheaffer, Lancaster, Pa.; Miss Car- 
rie Dennis. Mt. Holly, Cumberland 
Co., Pa.; Miss Irene Wise, Glen Rock 
York Co., Pa. 

E. G. Diehm, of Lititz, is soliciting 
funds for the purpose of construct- 
ing a lake at the College. The wa- 
ter can easily be supplied for it from 
Mr. Graybill's farm. 

The following persons have been 
visitors at the College since the op- 
ening of the Fall term. 

Sept. 5 — S. H. Huntsberger, Well- 
man, Iowa; Mrs. Anna Sides, Canton, 
Ohio; Miss Elizabeth Aldinger, Can- 
ton, Ohio; S. Schell. Louisville, Stark 
Co., Ohio; Sallie Schell, Louisville, 
Stark Co., Ohio; Lloyd Maplethorpe 



10 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



and wife, Kalona, Iowa; Catharine 
Kaylor, Elizabethtown, Pa.; Sara A. 
Gruber, Elizabethtown, Pa.; Glenn 
Huntzberger, Wellman, Iowa; Allie 
Huntzberger, "Wellman, Iowa; David 
M. Betchel and wife, Elizabethtown, 
Pa.; 

Sept. 6. — Mrs. D. H. Miller, Ship- 
pensburg, Pa. 

Sept. 9. — Mary N. Quinter, Jalal- 
por, India; Anna C. Spanogle, Lewis- 
town, Pa.; Minnie Will, Elizabeth- 
town, Pa.; Kathryn Harley, Eliza- 
bethtown, Pa. 

MAZIE MARTIN 



Alumni Notes 

The Alumni Association of Eliza- 
bethtown College still continues to 
grow in numbers. The class of 
1910 added twenty-one new mem- 
bers as Alumni of this institution. 
They are engaged in various pro- 
fessions and callings: — 

Misses Kathryn Moyer and Floy 
Crouthamel are both teaching pri- 
mary grades in the schools of their 
home towns. 

Philadelphia shall claim one of 
them, in Daisy Rider, who will go 
to the Academy of Fine Arts as a 
student and will then return to us 
as head of the Art department. 

Married life now holds another, 
S. G. Meyer, — an account of which 
will appear in this issue. 

L. D. Rose is back again, as Libra- 
rian, and is this year completing the 
Classical course. 

B. F. Waltz has returned to his 
Alma Mater and is pursuing studies 
in the Freshman year of the Classical 
course. 

Miss Florence Miller, a graduate 
in the English Scientific course is 
teaching near Terre Hill. 

A message from Olive Myers says 
that she is teaching her home school 
at Sylvan, and likes the work. 



Miss Mary Myers is teaching about 
two and a half miles from Greencas- 
tle. A card from her says, "I would 
love to be in school this year tout I 
enjoy teaching." 

The spirit which characterizes so 
many of our graduates — that of a 
desire for further work — also per- 
vades the hearts of the Rowe girls 
who have enrolled as students of 
Bridgewater College for the coming 
year. 

L. B. Earhart has accepted a lu- 
crative position as Principal of a 
High School in New Jersey. 

We are glad to note that Walter 
Eshleman is back again pursuing 
College preparatory work. 

A. C. Hollinger is at present taking 
the Piano Course here and doing 
some teaching at his home in Lancas- 
ter from Thursday evening until Sun- 
day. 

Abel Madeira has accepted a posi- 
tion at Buch's Sons' Establishment. 

E. Roy Engle is bookkeeper for the 
new Scales Co., in Elizabethtown. 

L. W. Lieter has returned and is 
taking College preparatory work. 

Deodate school finds Ray E. Gru- 
ber in charge. 

Hertzler Bros, have lately employ- 
ed Edgar G. Diehm as one of their 
clerks. 

During the summer Frances Steph- 
an accepted a position at the Morri- 
son Electric Supply Co., of Elizabeth- 
town. She is at present taking 
night work at the College. 

Miss Mary E. Balmer is living with 
her mother in Elizabethtown. 

Minerva Heisey has accepted J. 
Blaine Obor's position at Buch's es- 
tablishment. 

Jos. U. Frantz is working at his 
home on the farm. 

Enos Fry is a bookkepper at Lititz. 

Will K. Glasmire is at present fill- 
Injj a position as overseer of a lum- 
ber yard in Hunimelstown. Besides 



OUK COLLEGE TIMErf 



this he is director of the Reformed 
Church choir and has also organiz- 
ed several singing classes. 

So far as we know Lottie Becker 
is at present at her home in Eliza- 
bethtown. 

Elizabeth Kline is again a member 
of the faculty here, as one of the 
assistants in the Music department. 
She will finish the Piano Course this 
year. 

Cecile Smith is doing some musio 
teaching near her home. She ex- 
pects to return at some time to take 
further work. 

The friends of Walter K. Gish will 
be glad to learn that when last heard 
from he had stopped at Skagway on 
his journey to Circle City, Alaska. 
He expects to go by boat from Skag- 
way, unless the river was frozen over 
in which case he would take the win- 
ter trail. He reports a safe and 
pleasant voyage so far. He likes 
the simple pioneer, life quite well. 
He goes to fill a position as teacher 
in one of the Government Schools. 
Not only is the class of 1910 busy 
but there are others equally indus- 
trious and successful. 

Elizabeth Zortman, '06, is head 
nurse in charge of the children at the 
Young Women's Union, a Jewish In- 
stitution, at Philadelphia. 

W. K. Garman, '04, is employed 
as a stenographer in Uncle Sam's 
Navy department at League Island, 
Philadelphia. 

George Light, '0 7, is teaching the 
Grammer grade in the Hatfield 
schools. He has bought a fine new 
house' in which Mr. and Mrs. Light 
have a very cozy home. Neigh- 
bors of theirs call it the "light- 
house." 

Holmes S. Falkenstein spent the 
summer in Philadelphia, in the em- 
ploy of the Amer. Culm Furnace Co. 
Before returning he greatly enjoyed 



a trip to Montgomery Co., visiting 
college folks and friends. 

LEAH SHEAFFER. 

Society Notes. 

The Keystone Literary Society op- 
ened this year under favorable cir- 
cumstances. A number of new stu- 
dents have entered its ranks. They 
are already filled with enthusiasm.. 
We extend to all a hearty welcome,, 
and a sincere wish that they may at- 
tain the highest literary culture this: 
coming year that our Society affords.. 
The program for Sept. 9th was as: 
follows: Piano Solo, Gertrude Hess;; 
Address, Pres. H. K. Eby; Referred 
Question — Who Invented the Corliss 
Steam Engine? Francis Olweiler; 
Debate — Resolved: That the ad- 
vancement of Civil Liberty is more 
indebted to Intellectual Culture than 
to Force of Arms. Aff., H. H. Nye, 
H. K. Eby; Neg., I. S. Wampler, J. 
E. Myers; Address, R. W. Schlosser; 
Piano Solo, Viola Withers. 

The present officers are Pres., Mer- 
Longenecker; Sec, Mamie Keller; 
Editor, Gertrude Hess; Critic, Leah 
Sheaffer. 

On Sept. lGth a Roosevelt pro- 
ton Crouthamel; Vice Pres., Harry 
gram was given. Roosevelt's youth, 
life as a rough rider, as president, 
his trip to Africa, and his life as an 
author were ably discussed by mem- 
bers of the Society. 

The Society also enjoyed an ad- 
dress by Prof. Hanawalt, former 
president of Lordsburg College, Cali- 
fornia. B. F. WALTZ. 

Marriages. 

Meyer-Bucher. — On Tuesday, June 
28th, Samuel G. Meyer '10 and Fian- 
na P. Bucher were married at the 
home of the bride near Quarryville, 
Pa. The ceremony was performed 
by Eld. S. H. Hertzler of Elizabeth- 



12 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



town, who is at present the Elder in 
charge of the Mechanic Grove church 
of which Miss Bucher was a member. 

Mr. and Mrs. Meyer now reside 
near Fredericsburg, Lebanon Co., 
Pa. 

Dick-Hollinger. — The home of Mr. 
and Mrs. J. Ed. Hollinger, Moore- 
dale, Pa., was the scene of a 
pretty home wedding on Wed- 
nesday evening at 7.00 o'clock, 
Sept. 14, when their daughter Annie 
M. was united in wedlock with Mr. 
Trostle P. Dick of Waynesboro, Pa. 
The ceremony was performed by 
Rev. Albert Hollinger, brother of 
the bride. The attendants were, — 
Misses Jennie Dick, Estella Frantz 
and Messrs. Jacob Hollinger and 
Clarence Dick. The ceremony was 
performed in the presence of about 
one hundred and twenty-five guests, 
alter which a sumptious wedding din- 
ner was served. The honeymoon 
was spent on a tour to Philadelphia, 
Brooklyn, New York City and Way- 
nesboro, where the happy couple will 
reside. 

(Reported by EMMA CASHMAN.) 

To all these young friends, and 
former students Our College Times 
extends hearty congratulations. 

The Lecture Course. 

The library committee of Eliza- 
bethtown College is arranging for a 
series of lectures and musical events 
for the current school year. At 
this time the committee cannot de- 
finitely say what talent will be se- 
cured. For the present, however, 
we desire to announce the first two 
numbers so that our Alumni, former 
students, and friends may ta!:e ad- 
vantage of them. 

On October 28th, W. Quay Roselle 
Ph. D. will lecture in the College 
Chape] on the subject "The Univer- 
sity of Adversity." 



Dr. Roselle is an orator, philoso- 
pher and humorist, at this time pas- 
tor of the Baptist Church in Phila- 
delphia. He has delivered this lec- 
ture in nearly two hundred cities 
and towns, winning everywhere the 
highest praises. This will be a first 
class, popular lecture by a popular 
lecturer at Chautauqua assemblies 
and Teachers' Institutes. 

It is with pleasure that we an- 
nounce that Mr. Edward Baxter Per- 
ry will give another of his Piano 
Lecture Recitals in Heisey's Audi- 
torium on November 1st. Those 
who heard Mr. Perry last year, we 
are sure, will want to hear him again 
as he is rare talent in musical lines. 
There will be two lectures yet to ar- 
range for and we are endeavoring 
to get the very best talent that can 
be gotten at a reasonable figure. 
The course will be concluded by the 
musical department of the College 
as in former years. 

We ask the friends of the College 
for their continued patronage as the 
proceeds of the course will be used 
to enlarge the College library. 

LIBRARY COMMITTEE. 



Some of the latest visitors to the 
College were Mr. and Mrs. J. H. Herr, 
Ephrata; Mr. and Mrs.H. Y. Brandt and 
Mr. and Mrs. Moses M. Bowser and son 
Herbert, all of Manbeim; Mr. \V. C. 
Hinawalt of California. 



DEPATMENT WORK 



Department of Philosophy and IVdn- 
Ko K y. 
The subjects in this department 
are in charge of the President D. C. 
Reber. In the fall term the follow- 
ing subjects are taught: History of 
Philosophy, Educational Psychology, 
School Hygiene, Physiological Peda- 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



13 



gogics, History of Education, and 
Sociology. 

The College Seniors study the his- 
tory of philosophy, using Weber's 
History of Philosophy as a text. The 
class meets three times a week for 
hour recitations. In twenty weeks, 
the subject covering Ancient, Med- 
iaeval and Modern Philosophy will 
be completed. A thorough study of 
the theories of the great thinkers of 
the world is an excellent discipline 
for the mind and the class is now 
studying Grecian Philosophy at its 
high water mark. 

The class in Psychology consists 
of eleven ladles and one gentleman. 
At present a detailed study of the 
nervous system both as to structure 
and function is made as a sound bas- 
is for the comprehension of mental 
phenomena. The class in School 
Hygiene numbers seven. After com- 
pleting Shaw's text in this subject, 
the course is supplemented by out- 
lines on related topics and by refer- 
ence study from Hall's Adolescence 
and Burrage & Bailey's School De- 
coration, and Halleck's Education of 
the Central Nervous System. 

In the study of the History of Edu- 
cation, Monroe's textbook Is used. 
This book has been recently adopted 
and is probably the latest and best 
text on the subject. The class is 
required to do outside reading in oth- 
er texts. Among our reference 
works In the library are Laurie's Pre- 
christian Education, the Internation- 
al Educational Series complete in fif- 
ty-five volumes, the Great Educator 
series consisting of twelve volumes, 
etc. 

Pairbank's Introduction to Sociolo- 
gy is the text just adopted for teach- 
ing the elements of this subject. Af- 
ter studying society, — its nature, 
structure, and development in a gen- 
eral way, the bearings of this science 
on education are taken up. Dewey's 



School and Society, Scott's Social 
Education and Dutton's Social Phas- 
es of Education are discussed. Each 
member of the class is required to 
write a paper on The School's Mis- 
sion in Society thus making the stu- 
dent thoroughly conversant with this 
newer tendency in education. 

The pedagogical senior class is 
composed of M. Gertrude Hess, H. K. 
Eby and J. E. Myers. The Senior 
class in the Classical Course consists 
of L. D. Rose and R. W. Schlosser. 

French. 

For the advanced French students 
there has been arranged an interest- 
ing course which will introduce them 
to the most brilliant periods of liter- 
ary activity in France. The artifi- 
ciality of the seventeenth century will 
be seen in Mohere's famous comedy, 
Le Misanthrope; the trend of modern 
prose in Les Misevables by Hugo; 
present day tendencies in Cyrano de 
Bergerac by the well known dramatic 
Rostand. Oral and written com- 
position, along with the reading of 
selections of modern poetry will vary 
the routine of the now formal work. 

Mathematics. 

Four teachers have the work of 
this department in charge. Miss 
Elizabeth Kline teaches First Term 
Arithmetic, covering the subject up 
to Percentage. Prof. J. S. Harley 
has charge of the Second Term Arith- 
metic and Second Term Algebra. 

Mr. R. W. Schlosser conducts the 
classes in First and Third Term Alge- 
bra. The subject of Elementary Al- 
gebra is completed in the Third Term 
classes. 

Third Term Arithmetic is review- 
ed and completed under J. G. Meyer, 
who also has charge of College Alge- 
bra and Geometry, as well as of the 
Higher Mathematics. 

(Continued in next issue) 



Jos. D. Hollinger, 

ROOFING & SPOUTING 
HOT AIR FURNACKS 



Breeder of hell 'piione 

Prize-Winning 

Light Brahmas 

Elizabeth town Pa. 



Go To 

HERB'S BOOK STORE 

212-114 N. Queen St., Lancaster, Pa. 

— for — 

BOOKS AX1> STATIONERY 

PENNANTS PRINT! NG 



Bell, 9-5. Hours S to 6 

UK. JEROME G. HESS 

DENTIST 

Hertzler Bldg. Elizabethtown Pa. 



AMERICAN FIELD AND POULTRY 
PENCE 

JOS. H. RIDER c& SON 



£. L. RENSEL 

General Blaeksinithing 
and Repair Work 
Horse-Shoeing a Specialty. 

Park St.. Elizabethtown, Pa. 



J. RALPH GROSS 
THE BARBER 

Elizabethtown, - - lVnna 



JNO. M. SHOOKERS 
WATCHMAKER AND JEWELER 

5 yrs. with L. Weber & Son 
Lancaster, Pa, 
Elizabethtown, - - Per 



Bell & Ind. Phones 

The Lancaster Mail Order House 

Dealers in 

New and Old Books 
East Orange St., Lancaster, Pa 



For All Kinds of 

FARMING IMPLEMENTS 

Go To 

Geise & McBride 

ELIZABETHTOWN, - PENNA. 



BISHOP'S STUDIO 

Photos of All Styles. 

Framing Neatly Executed. 

Center Square. Elizabethtown. Penna. 



ELIZABETHTOWN 

Dental IParlors 



IIEIXDEL. Dentist. 



Cp-To-Date Shoe Repairing 
We Guarantee You the Best Service 

.ind Materials 
S. K. Barnes & Son, South Market St. 

ITVE AMI TEX CENT STOliK 
It is really wonderful what a few 
pennies will buy in our 5 and 10 
cent store and every article is useful 
about the house. Nothing in the 
store is priced for more than 10c and 
from that down to lc, 
ELIZABETHTOWN, - PENNA. 



0. N. HEISEY 

Provisions, Groceries (3& Choice Candies 



HEISEl HITLDIXG 



ELIZABETHTOWN'. PENNA. 



rhc Boole ot.orG. °- n - falkenstein 
Bibles, Books, ^tationer^, fl>ost Carbs 



Mail orders receive prompt attc 



ELIZABETHTOWN 

ROLLER MILLS 

J. F. BINKELV, Propr. 

Manufacturer of Best Grades of 

FLOUR & FEED 

Use Binkley's Celebrated Mash Food 

It Makes Hens Lay. 
ELIZA BETHTOWN, - PENNA. 



JOHN C. BARBERIAN 

Modem Shoe Repairing 
Work guaranteed and Prices right. 

MANHEIM STREE'I 



Ice Cream, Confectionery, Sodas of all kinds 
Mrs. S. Hornafins' Confectionery 



POORMAN'S BAKERY 

Choice Bread, Rolls and Cakes. 

HUMMELSTOWN STREET 



E. H. LEHMAN 



Co 



WOOD, GRAIN 
FLOUR, FEED 



At 



SEWER PIPE. 

ETC. ■ J 

Telephone 
ELIZABETHTOWN, - PENNA. 



FURNITURE 



THE MOST COMPLETE AND UP- 
TO-DATE LINE IX THIS SECTION 
OF THE COUNTRY. 

F. C. FISHER 

ELIZABETHTOWN', - PENNA. 

A. W. MARTIN 



COAL, WOOD, GRAIN 
FLOUR and FEED 

Telephone 
ELIZABETHTOWN, - PENNA. 

S. G. HERSHET 

Groceries, Dry 

Goods and 

Notions. 

ELIZABETHTOWN 1 , - PENNA. 



Sn rilOl r DRY GOODS, NOTIONS, FOOT 
r rllhfl I" WEAR, CARPETS, LINOLEUMS 



AND OIL CLOTHS. 



S. Market & Bainbridge St-. 



ELIZABETHTOWN, PA. 



Religious Appointments. 

Regular Preaching Services: — 

Sept. 11 — Sermon by Dr. D. C. 
Reber. Subject — "Divine Guid- 
ance." Text, Prov. 3:5, 6. 
Sept. IS — Sermon by G. H. Hana- 
walt. Subject — "For or A- 

gainst God." Text, Matt. 12:30 
Mid-Week Prayer Meetings: — 
Sept. 7 — Led by Miss Lydia Stauf- 

fer. 
Sept. 14 — Led by Mazie Martin. 
Sept. 21 — 
Sunday Bible Classes: — 

Meet every Sunday at 8.15 a. m. 
International S. S. Lesson, taught 
by Prof. J. G. Meyer; Mark, taught 
by Miss Lydia Stauffer. 
Teacher Training Class: — 
Teacher, Miss Stauffer. 

Meets Friday at 4.2,0 p. m. 
Missionary Reading Circle: — 
Teacher, Miss Lydia Stauffer. 
Meets Saturday at 6.45 p. m. 



The teachers and students of the Col- 
lege enjoyed a good social time on the 
campus on Saturday evening, September 
17, from supper-time until seven o'clock. 
The chocolate cake baked by Mrs. 
Keber and her co-workers was delicious, 
and was enjoyed by all. Can't we have 
some like it in the dining-room some- 
times? 



Mr. K. VV. Schlosser and family now 
occupy the cottage vacated by Prof. 
& Mrs. Kshleman. Mr. Schlosser in 
writing to a friend says : "Baby knows 
she has hands, sees everything and 
crows at a great rate sometimes." Her 
name is Floy, and she is three months 



Hirsh & Bro. 

Centre Square, Next to Cllv Hall 
LANCASTER, PA. 

Sole Agents for the Famous 
Michaels-Stern lteady-to 
Wear Suits and Overcoats, 
Men's Furnishings and Tail- 
oring. Plain Clothing a 
Specialty. Strictly one Price 
to All. 



"The House of Good 
Clothes." 



Men's and 

Young Men's 

Soft and Derby 

HATS 




The new Fall stylets are 
coming in daily and include 
all the popular and staple 
shapes, including a full range 
and sizes of Plain Hats with 
various sizes in lirii.i and 
crown. Our prices start as 
low as 50c. and in the bet- 
ter grades at 81 00, SI SO, 
$2 00. $3 00, $3 50. and 
84 00. We boas) of having 
the choices! the market af- 
fords. We sell (Quality and 
Comfort. 



S. M. Myers & Co. 

CLOTHING. HATS 

AND FURNISHINGS. 
12 Eaal King Street 

LANCASTER, PENN'A 



The Herald Book Store Z £K ;;„;:.' , 

T he Besl Line ol Local View Post Cards 

Also a Large Assortment of Comic Cards 

anfilhooi°saS. " tat ' onery I- A. SHIFFER, Propr. 



GET MY PRICES ON 

Building Material 



before purchasing. Will be 
pleased to <| note on anything 
in the Hardware line. Edi- 
son Phonographs, Sporting 
Hoods, Kodak supplies, etc. 

GEO. A. FISHER 

FI.IZ VHKTHTOWX, - PKXXA. 



/. E. BELSER 

tor Hooting, Spouting, Tin and 

• iranite Ware, Milk Cans, Radi- 
ators, Portable Furnaces, Granite 

I.isk Roasters in tour sizes, or 
anv special orders in ray line. 

• live me a trial. 



Opp. Exchange Bank 
FLIZAIJFTHTOWNV - PFXXA. 



SUBSCRIBE FOR 

OUR COLLEGE TIMES 
50c. PER YEAR 



0. C. RENSEL 

Choice Bread, Rolls 
& Cakes of All Kinds 

Prompt Delivery. 

S. Market St. 

KUZAHFTHTOWX, - FF.XNA. 



KUHN'S 

CHOICE BREAD AND 
CAKES 

Weddings and parties supplied 
with fancy Lakes at short 
notice. South Market Street. 

KI.IZABKTHTOWX, - PKXXA. 



Harry Miller 

Furniture & Undertaking 

Furniture Repairing «St Upholstering 
Picture Framing 



Bell Phone 
Klizabethtown, - - Penna. 



<!. WM. REISNER 

Manufacturing Jeweler, Class and 
Fraternity Fins, Pennants, Banners 



,a ill-aster. 



Penna. 



An early start, a steady pace, 
Is our way to win the race. 
We would advise those who can. 
Adopt a system, work the plan. 

Modern methods, nowadays, 
Are commendable in many ways 

AT XISSI,FY S 
LUNCH AND DINING ROOMS 

14-16 E. Chestnut St., Lancaster, Pa 



ELIZABETHTOWN COLLEGE FACULTY 



D. C. REBER, A. M. Pd. D., President 

Philosophy, Pedagogy, German. 
H. K. OBER, Pd. B., Vice President, 

B : o!o~ical Science, Agriculture, 

Surveying. 
ELIZABETH MYER, M. E., 

Elocution and Grammer. 
B. F. WAMPLER, B. E.. 

Director of Music. Voice Culture. 
FLORA GOOD WAMPLER, 

Piano, Organ, Harmony. 

J. G. MEYER. Pd. B., A. B., 

Mathematics, Physical Science. 
History. 

MARY E. MARKLEY, A. M., 

English, Latin and French. 

J. Z. HERR Prin. Commercial Dep't, 
Bookkeeping, Penmanship, Com- 
mercial Law. 



JACOB S. HARLEY, A. B., 

Geography, History and Civics. 

LYDIA STAUFFER, 
English Bible. 

LEAH M. SHEAFFER, Pd. B., 

Piano, Organ, Drawing, Physi- 
cal Culture. 



:hlo:ser, Pd. 

i an 1 Algebra. 



ELIZABETH KLINE, 

P'ano, English Branches. 
ANNA W. WOLGEMUTH, 

Shorthand and Typewriting. 
DAISY P. RIDER, Pd. B.. 

(Absent on Leave.) 
LAURA B. HESS, 

Sewing. 
ELD. S. H. HERTZLER, 

Exegesis 'Bible Term l. 



Contents 

Alumni Notes ------- in 

An Appeal From Alumni Fund Solicitor - - - - 13 

Battle Hymn of the Republic ..... - 

Bible Term ......... g 

Biograph ot .Julia Ward Howe ..... 7 

College Life a Success ....... 4 

Department Work ....... g 

Editorial ......... 3 

Exchanges -------- 15 

How the Battle Hymn of the Republic was Written - - - s 

Julia Ward Howe 3 

Lecture Course -------- lo 

Literary ......... 7 

Religious Services ....... jg 

School News ........ 14 

Society News ........ y> 

Thanks ......... in 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



KUZABKTHOWN, PA., NOVEMBER, 1910. 



No. 2 



EDITORIAL STAFF: 

ELIZABETH MVER, Editor-in-Chief 

HOLMES FALKENSTEIN, Associate Editor WALTER F. ESHLEMAN, Exchanges 

LEAH M. SHEAFFER, Alumni News MAZIE MARTIN, Locals 

B. F. WALTZ, Society News GERTRUDE MILLER, Stenographer 

R. W. SCHLOSSER, Business Manager 

Our College Times is published monthly, except in August and" September. 

The paper will be sent contiuous'.y to old subscribers, so as not to break their files, and arrearages charged, 
unless notice to discontinue has been received at expiration. 

Report changes of address, and failure to receive this paper regularly, to the Business Manager. 

Terms : Fifty cents per year, 10 cents monthly. 

Entered at the Post Office at Elizabethtown, Pa., as Second-Class Matter, April 19, 1909. 



EDITORIAL 

"So weicome thou. Thanksgiving 

Day! 
Roll all our selfish thoughts away." 

Notice the date for the first num- 
ber of the lecture course on another 
page of this issue. Some change 
has been made since the October 
number of Our College Times is out. 
Edward Baxter Perry's Piano — Lec- 
ture — Recital, Nov. 4. 

Nov. 13 — Anniversary of the 
Founding of the College. The 

Committee on Anniversaries for the 
year consists of Prof. B. F. Wamp- 
ler, Prof. J. Z. Herr, Miss Anna Wol- 
gemuth, and Eld. S. H. Hertzler. 
Nov. 13 falling on Sunday, the An- 
niversary exercises will be held the 
following Monday. We hope to re- 
port the different features of the 
program later. 



Bethany Bible School, Chicago, will 
be with us again. 

Every member of the Alumni As- 
sociation can show his loyalty to his 
Alma Mater by subscribing for our 
College Times. Our subscription 
list is growing. Who'll be the next 
to help us push forward the work? 

Will the readers of our College 
Times please send us the names and 
addresses of any of their acquaint- 
ances who think of going away to 
school? The authorities of Eliza- 
bethtown College highly appreciate 
the many kind words which our old 
students and friends say about our 
school. 

If you are interested in college 
work, send your name and address 
to Pres. D. C. Reber and you will re- 
ceive a copy of our catalogue. 



Thanksgiving Day! November 24. 



Bible Term begins Dec. Sth. Con- 
tinues ten days. Bro. Lauver, from 



Our Fall Term ends Thursday, 
Dec. 1. Winter Term begins Mon- 
day, Dec. 5. You should engage a 
room for the Winter Term now. 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



We kindly ask our friends and 
subscribers to report such news as 
they think would interest our read- 
ers. Address all articles to Miss 
Elizabeth Myer, Editor-in-chief, or 
to any other member of the editorial 
staff. 

Trustee A. G. Longenecker's new 
house on College Avenue is going 
up rapidly and presents a good ap- 
pearance. 

Miss Crouthamel in a letter to the 
editor says: "I have read the Col- 
lege Times with great pleasure. It 
seems a link connecting us with the 
old friends and places. I am look- 
ing forward to the next number 
with great interest." 

College Life a Success 
Elizabethtown College does not 
think that a person's education is 
complete when he has gathered his 
knowledge wholly from books and 
has neglected the instruction which 
is gained from coming in touch with 
men and women of the world. The 
management has wisely appointed a 
Faculty Committee on Social Cul- 
ture. The members of this commit- 
tee at present are Mrs. B. F. Wamp- 
ler, Mary E. Markley, Elizabeth Kline 
and R.W.Schlosser. It Is the business 
of this committee to arrange for some 
member of the Faculty to give a talk 
before the students and teachers in 
Chapel on some subject relating to 
social matters at regular intervals 
during the term. 

The first talk during the Fall Term 
was given by President D. C. Reber, 
on the subject of "How to Make 
College Life a Success." Anions 
the excellent points presented by Dr. 
Reber were these: 

1. SlDgleness of purpose. It is 
unfortunate for students to come to 



school without a definite purpose in 
view. If he has no purpose, If he 
has no aim, he cannot accomplish 
anything. Paul said, "This one 
thing I do." The points that divert 
a student's attention are first, too 
many correspondents; second, visit- 
ing friends who are away from the 
college; ladies and gentlemen in 
school forming intimate acquaint- 
ance-ship, which detracts from inter- 
est in study. 

2. Regularity of attendance, in 
class, at meals, at preaching services, 
at prayer meeting, at Missionary 
Reading Circle meetings, at Literary 
Society, in physical culture class, 
were some of the points that were 
urged as elements of success. Dr. 
Reber did well in stating that wiser 
heads than those of our boys and 
girls have planned all those phases 
of college work, and that those who 
fail to take advantage of the great- 
er number of them, are not living a 
full student life. 

3. Honesty is the third great es- 
sential to success. Deception in 
any of its forms is opposed to hones- 
ty. The student who is known to 
be untruthful will not be trusted by 
teachers or students. A point In 
College ethics is, that when you are 
called on for information by some 
member of the Faculty, it is your 
duty to give such information as you 
lfavo at hand. 

1. it is neceessary for a student 
to select proper associates. He may 
be sociable and kindly disposed to- 
ward all students, but he should be 
slow in making intimate friends. He 
should form close friendship with 
members of the Faculty first, ami 
then with one or more students. 

5. Patience is one of the most 
Important essentials in a student's 
life. It is not the amount of talent 
that counts so much as the earnest 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



and Continued effort that is put 
forth on the part of the student. 
When opportunities open for accept- 
ing positions before a student's edu- 
cation is finished, it is a mistake to 
accept them. 

Some of the non-essentials set forth 
by the speaker were, — fun at anoth- 
er's expense, and too much spending 
money. 

Students will do well to heed the 
wholesome advise in the suggestions 
given above. 

Julia Ward Howe 

In the death of Julia Ward Howe, 
October 17, at her home in Middle- 
town, R. I., at the age of ninety-one 
years, the nation has cause to mourn 
one of the greatest and most cultur- 
ed women of the twentieth century. 
We all know her as the author of 
"The Battle Hymn of the Republic." 
This poem which was composed forty- 
nine years ago. is still ringing around 
the world. During Roosevelt's ad- 
ministration, he suggested that this 
poem be recognized as a national 
hymn. A certain author says, — "It 
is pleasing to note that for once, at 
least, poetry and fact so nearly coin- 
cide, as the hand that rocked the 
cradle did help to rule her part in 
the world; for this song soon after 
its publication in 1SG1, made good its 
title, and became one of the leading 
lyrics of the Civil War. Chaplain 
McCafce tells of how the soldiers, con- 
fined in Libby prison, made the walls 
ring with the "Battle Hymn of the 
Republic." In summing up the suc- 
cesses of a well spent life, at the age 
of eighty-nine, Julia Ward Howe her- 
self said, "I have written one poem, 
which, although composed in the 
stress and strain of the Civil War, is 
now sung North and South by the 
champions of free government." 

Julia Ward Howe was one of the 



most cultured women of our land. 
Her unusual education in Music, and 
in the French, Italian, German, 
Greek, Hebrew, and Latin languages, 
are noted in an article published in 
a copy of the "Etude" about two 
years ago. In this article Mrs. Howe 
says, — "The French language was 
somehow burnt into my mind by a 
cruel French teacher, who made my 
lessons as unpleasant as possible." 
But afterwards she adds that she 
had benefited by his severity, for she 
says, "I have been able all my life, 
not only to speak French fluently, but 
also to write it with ease." 

The three daughters of the aged 
authoress, Mrs. Florence Howe Hall, 
Mrs. Laura Richards, and Mrs. John 
Elliot, were gathered about the bed- 
side of their mother when the end 
came. 

Only two weeks ago the degree of 
Doctor of Humanities was conferred 
upon Mrs. Howe by Smith College of 
Massachusetts. 

The following appropriate words 
relating to this great woman's life 
are taken from the Lancaster Exam- 
iner for Oct. 20, — "Julia Ward Howe, 
who has just died at the advanced 
age of ninety-one was a grand woman 
a splendid moral force and a con- 
stant inspiration to her sex at large. 
Her influence for good will live for- 
ever, though her words may perish — 
even the noble "Battle Hymn of the 
Republic," seems destined nev- 

er to be nationalized as the South will 
not accept it. It seems to appeal more 
to the literary heart than to the com- 
mon one. Her death leaves one old 
man, Col. Thomas Wentivorth Higgin- 
son, born in 1823, to represent New 
England literature, and another re- 
markable old man, John Bigelow, 
born in 1S17, to represent the liter- 
ary life of New York. These exam- 
ples of old age would seem to prove 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



that the intellectual life is conducive 
to length of years." 



BIBLE TERM 

This year the Annual Bible Term 
of Elizabethtown College opens De- 
cember S, 1910 and lasts only ten 
days. By giving smaller compass 
to the work so far as time is con- 
cerned, it is hoped that there will he 
greater interest and concentration of 
effort realized. 

The instruction this year will be 
given by several members of the Fac- 
ulty with the assistance of two lead- 
ing Bible teachers who have made 
special preparation for this kind of 
work. These are Elder J. Kurtz 
Miller, from Brooklyn, N. Y., who 
has been at Elizabethtown College 
Bible Terms quite frequently, and 
Elder G. M. Lauver, an instructor 
in Bethany Bible School, of Chicago. 
Bro. Miller will teach two periods 
daily. He will teach Matthew's 
Gospel and the Epistle to the Ephes- 
ians. Bro. Lauver will teach three 
periods daily, his subjects being the 
Epistle of James, Parables, and Pray- 
er. Elder S. H. Hertzler will teach 
the Book of Romans, which was so 
effectively taught about seven years 
ago. 

There will be preaching services 
eacb evening beginning on Thursday 
evening, Dec. 8, at seven o'clock. The 
nature of the sermons will be doc- 
trinal and along the line of Christian 
living. Elder Lauver will do the 
preaching each evening. His strong 
discourses of last year at our Bible 
Term will be recalled as being clear 
and convincing. 

Special programs will be prepared 
to be rendered as follows: the Educa- 
tional Program will be given Sat., 
Dec. 10, the Sunday School Program, 
Sun., Dec. 11, the Missionary Pro- 



gram, Sat., Dec. 17. These special 
programs together with the work of 
the regular members of the Faculty, 
who assist in the Bible Term, will be 
announced in the December issue of 
Our College Times. 

The expenses for the ten days will 
be five dollars. This covers the 
board and room-rent. Tuition is 
free for those lodging at the College. 
All others will be asked to contrib- 
ute one dollar towards defraying the 
expenses incurred by securing the 
special teachers from a distance 
whose traveling expenses are consid- 
erable. Single meals will be fur- 
nished at twenty cents, and a single 
night's lodging will be provided at 
fifteen cents. 

The management feels that an un- 
usually helpful Bible session is in 
store for those who will avail them- 
selves of this short session of Bible 
study. Everybody is invited to be 
present at the day session and even- 
ing sermons. Please remember 
that the Bible Term this year occurs 
in December and will be concluded 
a week before Christmas. A special 
circular will be ready soon, giving 
further particulars and will be mail- 
ed to anyone applying for it. 



Elder, D. L. Miller, of Mt. Morris, 
III., was in Elizabethtown from Sun- 
day. Oct. 9 until Sat., Oct. 15. He 
preached on Sunday morning and 
evening and gave interesting lec- 
tures nnil sermons during the week. 
liis words of advice and encourage- 
ment made a deep impression on all. 
Elder Miller not only knows what to 

Saj leit he knows bow to say it in the 

most torceable and effective manner. 
His broad knowledge, culture, and 
Sterling Christian character rank lii ill 

among the great pillars of the Church 
of Jesus Christ. H. S. F. 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



Battle-Hymn of the Republic. 

Mine eyes have seen tbe glory of the 

coming of the Lord : 
He is trampling out the vintage where 

the grapes of wrath are stored ; 
He hath loosed the fateful lightning of 

his terrible swift sivosd : 

His truth is marching on. 

CHOBU8 

Glory! glory! Hallelujah! 
Glory! glory! Hallelujah! 
Glory! glory! Hallelujah! 
His truth is marching on. 

1 have seen Him in the watch-fires of a 

hundred circling camps; 
They have builded Him an altar in the 

evening dews and damps; 
1 have read His righteous sentence by 

the diamond flaring lamps. 

His day is marching on. 

I have read a fiery gospel, writ in burn- 
ished rows of steel : 

"As ye deal with my contemners, so 
with you my grace shall deal; 

Let the Hero, born of woman, crush the 
serpent with his heel, 

Since God is marching on." 

He has sounded forth the trumpet that 
shall never call retreat ; 

He is silting oit the hearts of men be- 
fore his judgment-seat: 

Oh! be swift, my soul, to answer Him, 
be jubilant, my feet! 

Our God is marching on. 

In the beauty of the lilies Christ was 
born across the sea, 

With a glory in his bosom that trans- 
figures you and me : 

As he died to make men holy, let us die 
to make men free, 

While God in marching on. 

Julia Ward How 



Biography of Julia Ward Howe 

Julia Ward Howe, an American 
author and philanthropist, was born 
in New York, the 27th of May, 1819. 



Her father, Samuel Ward, of the 
banking house of Prime, Ward, and 
King, a man of culture and promi- 
nent in financial circles, was the 
Founder and first president of the 
New York Bank of Comerce. 

But notice how unusual her educa- 
tion was for a girl of that time. Be- 
sides being familiar as a child with 
the French and Italian languages, she 
speaks German as well. She early 
acquired some knowledge of Latin, 
and has even studied Greek and He- 
brew. "The French language was 
somehow burnt into my mind by a 
cruel French teacher who made my 
lessons as unpleasant as possible," she 
complains, but afterwards she adds 
that she had profited by his severity, 
for "I have been able all my life, not 
only to speak French fluently, but 
also to write it with ease." 

The narrative is especially inter- 
esting where she speaks of being pas- 
sionately fond of music in her youth. 
Her musical education was of the best 
that the time could afford. "My 
second teacher," she continues, "was 
a Mr. Boocock, who had been a pupil 
of Cramer, and I learned to appre- 
ciate the works of the great compos- 
ers, Beethoven, Handel and Mozart." 

In singing her voice was trained 
by an Italian musician, who had been 
an intimate friend of Mme. Mali- 
bran's family, and was well acquaint- 
ed with Garcia's admirable method. 

Having successfully reared a large 
family of talented children herself, 
Mrs. Howe's views are entitled to 
consideration when she argues that 
in the training of young persons some 
regard should be had to the sensitive- 
ness of youthful nerves, and to the 
response which they often make to 
the appeals of music." 

In IS 43 she married Dr. S. G. Howe 
of Boston, and immediately became 
active in philanthropical work. 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



With her husband she edited the 
Commonwealth," one of the 
anti-slavery papers, to which 
she contributed articles, essays, 
poems, and witty comments. At the 
same time she also wrote for the 
New York- Tribune. 

Since the Civil War she has been 
active as writer and speaker in other 
social and philanthropical work, par- 
ticularly in the agitation for women's 
suffrage and for prison reform. 

She was one of the founders of 
the New England's Women's Club, 
the first organization of its kind in 
America, she was delegate to the 
World's Prison Reform Congress in 
London in 1872, and was president 
of the women's branch of the New 
Orleans Exposition in 1SS4. She 
has also preached in Unitarian pul- 
pits. She was president of the Bos- 
ton Authors' Club from its founda- 
tion in 1899. Her writings include 
"Passion Flowers," 1S54, "Words 
for the Hour," 1S5G, "A Trip to 
Cuba," "From the Oak to the Olive," 
(two books of travel), "The World's 
Own," (a drama), "Sex and Educa- 
tion," "Modern Society." Her best 
known poem is the "Battle Hymn of 
the Republic." 

How the Battle Hymn of the Re- 
public -was 'Written. 

Mrs. Howe in her delightful reminis- 
cences, asserts that it would be impossi- 
sible for her to say how many times she 
has been called upon to rehearse the 
circumstances under which she wrote 
"The Battle Hymn of the Republic." 

Her husband, Dr. Howe, her senior by 
almost a score of years, was already be- 
yond the age of military service when 
the war broke out, but rendered valuable 
aid as an officer of that Sanitary Com- 
mission at Washington, which at that 
time was the great center of interest. 
And her first visit to that city was in the 
late autumn of 1861, in company with 



Gov. Andrew of Mass., the Rev. Free- 
man Clarke, and her husband. 

One day the party was invited to at- 
tend a review of troops, at some distance 
from the town. But the review was in- 
terrupted by a sudden movement of the 
enemy which was not far oil". One de- 
tachment of soldiers was dispatched to 
the aid of a small body of men, which 
was in imminent danger of being sur- 
rounded. And the remaining regiments 
were ordered to march to their canton- 
ments. 

As the troops nearly filled the road, 
the return of the invited guests to the 
city was very slow. "To beguile the 
rather tedious drive," explains Mrs. 
Howe, "we sang snatches of the army 
songs, so popular at that time, conclud- 
ing with "John Brown's Body." The 
soldiers seemed to like this, and 
answered back, '-Good for you." 

"Mr. Clarke, who was in the same car- 
riage, said to me, 'Mrs. Howe, why do 
you not write some good words for that 
stirring tune'" I replied that I had 
often wished to do this, but bad not as 
yet found anything in my mind leading 
to it." 

Mrs. Howe goes on to narrate that in 
spite of her exciting day, she slept quite 
soundly, "But," she continues, "awoke 
in the gray morning twilight, and as I 
lay waiting for the dawn, the long lines 
of the desired poem began to twine 
themselves in my mind. For fear of 
forgettiug them, I sprang out of bed, 
anil, in the dimness found an old stump 
of a pen, which 1 remembered having 
used the day before. I scrawled the 
verses almost without looking at the 
paper. I had learned to do this," she 
naively confessed, "when on previous 
occasions, attacks of versification had 
visited me in the night, and I feared to 
wake the baby who slept near me." 

It is pleasing to record that for once at 
least poetry and fact so nearly coincided; 
as the hand that rocked the cradle 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



did help to rule her part in the world; 
for the song soon made good Its title, 
and became one of the leading lyrics of 
the war, although as CaDt. Butt re- 
marked, there is not a sectional line in 
it. Chaplain McCabe tells of bow the 
union soldiers, confined in Libby prison, 
made the walls ring with the "Battle 
Hymn of the Kepublic." 

Compiled by MARY GISH 



DEPARTMENT WORK 



(Continued fron 



In the English Department enough 
courses are offered during the year" 
to satisfy the demands of any stu- 
dent, no matter in what direction his 
interest in his mother tongue may 
lead him. As a basis for all future 
work a thorough course in Composi- 
tion and Rhetoric has been carefully 
planned. By constant practise in 
writing and by the critical study of 
typical specimens of prose the stu- 
dent is not only given facility in 
speaking and writing, but he gains 
the ability to form for himself ade- 
quate literary judgments. 

Two classes in the History of Eng- 
lish Literature are tracing the use, 
development, and florescence of the 
literary impulse in England. The 
elementary class necessarily will have 
to do the work in a general way, 
but the advanced class is given the 
opportunity to do a great deal of out- 
side reading in connection with their 
study of the text. The student in 
this course is expected to go to first 
sources — the literature itself for in- 
formation; to draw conclusions and 
form opinions from this investiga- 
tion. 

Classes for the study of representa- 
tive literary masterpieces will be or- 
ganized later. In them the college 



entrance requirement books will be 
read and every effort will be made to 
show students how to read inte'i- 
gently and enjoy thoroughly the 
gems of English Literature. Th« 
primary purpose is to cultivate a 
taste for the best and highest liter- 
ary art. 

There has been a call, too, for the 
advanced course scheduled in the 
catalogue as English Drama. In it 
students who are already familiar 
with the chief phases of literary de- 
velopment will be introduced to the 
most fascinating and romantic move- 
ment of all time, a movement which 
produced a peerless Shakespeare. 

Latin. 

The Latin Department has a larg- 
er enrollment than last year, though 
there are no students doing advanc- 
ed work as there were then. Class- 
es have been organized not only for 
the study of elementary Latin, which 
ought to be taken by every pupil who 
would properly understand his own 
language, but also for the reading of 
Caesar, Cicero and Vergil. Of these 
authors enough is read to satisfy the 
college entrance requirements. It is 
our purpose, of course, to familiarize 
the student with Latin syntax, to 
point out relations between English 
and Latin vocabularies, and to give 
him ability to read intelligently at 
sight. But our higher aim is to 
bring about an appreciation of these 
works as masterpieces of style and 
subject matter; to study for what they 
are — unsurpassed types of great lit- 
erature. 

Music Department. 

The Music Department has a num- 
ber of new students enrolled in its 
courses this year. 

The enrollment at the beginning 
of school in this deparment is the 



IO 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



largest in the history of the Institu- 
tion. 

The teachers in this department 
are not only gratified with the num- 
ber of students enrolled, but with 
the possibilities which both the old 
and new students show for doing a 
high grade of work. 

The Seniors in the Music Courses 
are beginning to trace the develop-* 
ment of their art, and to unfold its 
charms and mysteries in the lives of 
our ancient and modern Music Fath- 
ers. 

A large class in sight-reading and 
ear-training has been organized. A 
number of literary students have a- 
vailed themselves of the opportuni- 
ties which this class affords for learn- 
ing to read music. 



A class in Greek Elements has 
been started. There are five taking 
this subject. J. G. Meyer, their in- 
structor, is pleased with the interest 
these students manifested in their 
attempt to learn Greek. 

History. 

Every member of the class in Uni- 
ted States History seems thoroughly 
interested in the study of the topic 
now under consideration, the devel- 
opment of the English colonies. The 
relation of cause and effect, when it 
exists between events, is carefully 
noted, and a bird's eye view of the 
whole situation as it progresses a- 
long the Atlantic coast is kept before 
the class. Important events in Eng- 
lish history are referred to as they 
affect the progress of American colo- 
nization. 

The aim of the course in Grecian 
History is more especially to study 
the growth and unfolding life of the 
Hellenes during the legendary pre- 
historic development and historic e- 



vents which have transpired among 
the different Greek city-states and 
rival powers of the Grecian era, with 
special stress on that sphere in which 
the intellectual and ethical life of the 
Greeks unfolded itself, geographical- 
ly as well as chronologically. 

Bible Department 

Our students have enrolled for Bi- 
ble Geography, Hebrew History and 
Acts of the Apostles. These class- 
es meet each day regularly. Once 
each week those interested in Sunday 
School meet for better preparation 
"for teaching. 

New beauties are seen in God's 
Word as we study his wonderful deal- 
ing with mankind in both the Old and 
New Testament. 

We recognize the incompleteness 
of an education without some syste- 
matic study of the Book of books, 
and hope to welcome many more in- 
to this department. 

Agricultural Department 

The orchard and berry patches un- 
der the management of the agricul- 
tural department present a fine ap- 
pearance. The students in this de- 
partment do actual field work a- 
mounting to four hours for each 
week during the year. This out- 
door work is so arranged that most 
of it is performed during the Fall and 
Spring Terms. This Fall Term the 
berry patches have been trimmed and 
thoroughly cultivated, the potatoes 
have been taken up from the orchard 
and the soil well tilled. 

Through the efforts of Prof. H. K. 
Ober the orchard is accepted by the 
State Departmnt as one of their ex- 
perimental and demonstration sta- 
tions. This means that there will 
be free instruction to the public In 
spraying and pmnnlng of trees and 
In fruit production. 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



It is the aim of this department 
to foster a strong love for the farm 
and its development, to inspire the 
young men and women with a zeal 
for country life. We hope for great 
things from this department and 
with the growing interest which is 
manifested in this line of work we 
feel that much good will result from 
this important move. 

Commercial Department. 

Students are continually enrolling. 
The work in this department is so 
arranged as to allow enrollment at 
any time, each student doing indivi- 
dual work under personal supervis- 
ion on the part of the instructors. 

A new feature of this department 
is the night session given for the 
benefit of those who are precluded 
from attending the day sessions by 
reason of employment during the 
day. This department is in session 
from seven to nine o'clock every 
Monday and Wednesday evening. 
The regular courses of study in 
Bookkeeping and in Shorthand train- 
ing at the night sessions are the same 
as those of the day sessions. The 
same teachers give instructions, and 
students who graduate from either 
course receive the same diploma that 
is granted to those completing the 
course in the daily sessions. 

The systems used in this depart- 
ment are the Sadler, Rowe Office 
Practice, and the famous Gregg sys- 
tem of Shorthand. The student se- 
cures his knowledge almost entire- 
ly by practice. 

Feeling the growing demand for 
thorough and practical training in 
commercial transactions, we have 
made special efforts to strengthen 
this department. With our present 
management and equipment of type- 
writers, offices, banking outfit, etc., 
we feel that the advantages we offer 



are fully equal to, and in several 
respects superior to those offered by 
the regular Business Colleges. 

Physical Culture. 

True education consists not only 
in training the head, in developing 
the intellect, but in developing the 
body as well. It is this ideal that 
Elizabethtown College strives to at- 
tain and hence affords opportunity 
for both boys and girls to receive 
this training in the Gymnasium. 

The need of this work can not be 
questioned. The sedentary life of 
the student needs some activity which 
shall be directed systematically. The 
exercise and drills which are given 
in the Physical Culture classes are 
intended to stimulate the processes 
of circulation, respiration and diges- 
tion. Besides this they strengthen 
the muscles and give grace and ease 
to the body. In all the work cor- 
rect position of the body when walk- 
ing and standing are insisted upon. 

Teaching along these lines becom- 
es necessary because the students' 
natural position is not one which is 
conducive to correct carriage. 

The work of the Fall Term open- 
ed with a goodly number enrolled. 
Free hand movements and marches 
constitute the beginning work. 
Great interest is manifested by all. 

Besides the in-door training all 
students are urged to take part in 
out-door recreation in the form of 
walks, tennis, base ball and the like. 
A basket ball association is in the 
process of formation. All this work 
is under the supervision of the Fac- 
ulty Committee on Physical Culture. 

Sewing. 

We are glad to say that with the 
beginning of this school year we can 
announce a sewing course. 

Sewing is an art that every young 



12 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



lady should try to attain, if not spe- 
cially gifted with this art. The aim 
of this course is to teach the young 
lady how to cut and sew her own 
garments as well as those of others. 
The requirements for this course are 
a common school education and a 
willingness to learn. No art can 
be fully developed until the student 
has heart and hand in the work. The 
students are required to do practical 
sewing outside of class, just as other 
students must study to make their 
work or course a success. We have 
started this course with eight stu- 
dents, and a number of others desire 
to take the work. Some of the 
work done in this course is basting, 
serging. seaming, sherring, tucking, 
hemming, button-holes and cutting. 
The finished products we expect by 
the end of the Fall Term are aprons, 
hemstitched handkerchiefs, infants' 
outfits, etc. 

These students receive two lessons 
each week at twenty-five cents a les- 
son. 



SOCIETY NOTES 

Tennyson's favorite books were the 
Bible and Shakespeare's works. He 
once advised a boy to read from 
them daily. "The Bible," he said, 
"will teach you how to speak to God; 
Shakespeare will teach you how to 
speak to your fellows." It is well 
to have thoughts like these commit- 
ted to memory. They will influence 
our lives for good. Repeating the 
thoughts of the best men again and 
again will influence our lives in a 
way that a mere reading will never 
do. The precious gems of litera- 
ture, the masterpieces, the immortal 
things — these will become part of lis, 
and form the very substance of our 
intellectual and spiritual being. 

Many have joined the Keystone 



Literary Society, and thus are be- 
coming educated in a high and true 
sense: — fed (for that is what the word 
really means) upon intellectual man- 
na, which might well he the food of 
the angels. 

The Literary Society in educating, 
calls upon each member to contrib- 
ute his or her part. The drill the 
speakers get not only fits them for 
the bar and the pulpit, but for the 
small meetings in which each one 
will some day have an interest in the 
various communities from which 
they come. 

The Society has had excellent pro- 
grams the past month. Prof. Meyer 
addressed the Society on the sub- 
ject of "Little Things." He point- 
ed out in a very realistic way how 
they count not only while at school, 
but in life in general. 

Miss Markley spoke to the Society 
of her trip to Europe. She spoke 
mainly of Italy, impressing the audi- 
ence with the powerful influence it 
has had on civilization. The de- 
scription of the art galliers of var- 
ious cities, architecture of noted 
buildings, and things of educational 
importance in general were very 
much appreciated. 

Some questions debated are as fol- 
lows: 

Resolved, That money influences 
men more than principle. 

Resolved, That the Pleasures of 
Hope are more beneficial than the 
Pleasures of Memory. 

Resolved, That Roosevelt should 
be elected in 1912. 

Resolved, That the eight hour day 
is necessary and reasonable. 

The music under the leadership 
Of Miss Klizabeth Kline, deserves 
special praise. The Society has not 
lacked anything in music this term. 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



Society Hall is crowded at every 
meeting, showing great interest. 

The newly elected officers are: 
Pres., Francis Olweiler; V. Pres., 
Frank Carper; Sec, Lilian Falken- 
stein; Ed., H. K. Eby; Critic, Prof. 
Harley; Chorister, Isaac Wampler; 
Librarian, Holmes S. Falkenstein; 
Treas., Calvin Rose. 

Mr. Olweiler, in his inaugural ad- 
dress, impressed the new members 
especially, with their duty to them- 
selves and the Society. 

B. F. WALTZ. 



ALUMNI NOTES 

Married — Mr. H. H. Lehman, '05, 
of Elizabethtown, to Miss Effie Hilde- 
brand of Pasadena, California, on 
Sept. 17, 1910. They will reside at 
411 Maple Way, Pasadena. 

Married — At the home of the bride 
Prof. J. G. Meyer, '05, now teaching 
at the College, to Miss Anna P. Royer 
of Denver, on Thursday, Oct. 13. 
Prof, and Mrs. Meyer will live at the 
College in the room once occupied by 
Prof, and Mrs. Wampler. 

Married — Miss Lydia Buckwalter, 
'0 5, of Lancaster, to Mr. John Heil- 
man, of Allentown, on Saturday, Oct. 
15. The happy couple will reside 
at GG2 Columbia Ave, Lancaster, Pa. 

This is a strange coincidence, the 
president and secretary of the class 
of 1905 both married during the 
same week. We feel sure that every 
Alumnus wishes these couples a very 
bright and prosperous life. 

Miss Bessie Rider, '03, of Eliza- 
bethtown, is now in training for a 
nurse at the General Hospital, of 
Lancaster. She visits the College 
whenever opportunity presents itself. 
Her sister, Daisy, '10, who is at 
present taking work at the Academy 
of Fine Arts, Philadelphia, writes 



the following, "People, city, work, 
and home fine." 

We were glad to reveive a 
visit a few weeks ago from Miss 
Elizabeth Zortman, of Philadelphia. 
She is much interested in her work. 

A letter from A. P. Geib, '09. to 
the editor states the following: "I 
am this year taking some work at 
Dr. White's Bible School. in con- 
nection with this I am doing some 
teaching and general work at the 
Brooklyn Mission. I like my work 
thus far." 

Miss Viola Withers, '09, of Eliza 
bethtown, left last week for Phila- 
delphia, where she expects to con- 
tinue her musical training at Comb's 
Conservatory. 

Miss Jennie Miller, '09, has gone 
to fill the position of Music teacher 
at Hebron Seminary, Nokesville, Vir- 
ginia. 

H. L. Smith, 'OS, has recently re- 
turned from California and will take 
a position as teacher in the new 
school just started at Harrisburg. 
This school is under the supervision 
of the River Brethren Church. 

L. M. S. 

An Appeal From Alunmi-Fund 
Solicitor. 

Last June the Alumni Association 
elected Dr. D. C. Reber, Prof. J. Z. 
Herr and James H. Breitigan as a 
Committee to solicit, hold in trust, 
and invest the money of the Alumni 
endowment fund. It is the desire 
of this Committtee to have raised by 
the coming Commencement week, 
one thousand dollars. 

The Alumni of the school number 
one hundred and twenty-two. If an 
allowance of twenty-two of this num- 
ber be made for those who on ac- 
count of sickness or other misfortune 
or disappointment cannot contribute 



14 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



to this fund, then the remaining one 
hundred hy contributing ten dollars 
each, could raise the required a- 
mount. 

In response to an appeal to the 
Alumni in the April issue of "Our 
College Times" by Dr. D. C. Reber, 
the amount of three hundred and 
fifteen dollars was raised toward the 
fund, this sum being subscribed by 
twelve members of the Association, 
making an average subscription of 
twenty six dollars and twenty-five 
cents each. 

In view of the foregoing we feel 
that we are justified in asking at 
least ten dollars from each Alumnus 
who has not already subscribed to 
the fund; and we believe that each 
Alumnus will show sufficient loyalty 
to his or her Alma Mater by rallying 
around so noble a cause and making 
possible the one thousand dollars by 
next Commencement. 

All pledges or money to be applied 
toward this fund can be mailed to 
the writer, who is the authorized so- 
licitor for the Association. 

JAMES BREITIGAN, Lititz, Pa. 



SCHOOL NEWS 

Locals 

Have you heard in the distance 
the faint gobble of the Thanksgiv- 
ing turkey? 

The short talk in Chapel by Dr. 
Reber, Tuesday morning, Oct. 11, , 
on "How to Make College Life a 
Success" was well received. 

The sewing department students 
are busy hemming, seaming, tucking, 
basting, laying patterns, etc. They 
lately had a new machine added to 
their equipment. 

Mr. and Mrs. S. B. Dennis, from 
Carlisle, Pa., parents of Miss Carrie 
Dennis, who is a student here, mov- 



ed into the basement of Memorial 
Hall, on Oct. 4th. Mr. Dennis is our 
janitor, while Mrs. Dennis cleans the 
halls and class rooms, and helps in 
the culinary department. 

Dr. and Mrs. Reber entertained 
several of the teachers at their home 
on Wednesday evening, Sept 2 8. 

Miss Myer lately purchased four 
upholstered chairs and placed one in 
the reception room. 

The orchard presents a fine appear- 
ance. Prof. Ober, assisted by Mr. 
Longenecker, an industrious student 
of the agricultural department, is 
putting it in good condition for the 
winter. 

Prof. Wampler, William Kulp, Al- 
vin Musser, Gertrude Miller and 
Mazie Martin attended Ephrata Love- 
feast, on Saturday, Oct. 15. 

Miss Markley recently enjoyed a 
visit from her grandfather, Mr. A. 
G. Markley, of Zanesville, Ohio. 

On September 18th a group of fif- 
teen students and teachers walked to 
Donegal Springs, a place of histori- 
cal interest. Here is located an old 
Scotch Irish Presbyterian Church 
built on. land donated by the sons of 
William Penn. 

W. E. Glasmire, one of the lead- 
ing spirits of the class of 1910, gave 
proof of his loyalty by visiting his 
Alma Mater a few weeks after the 
Fall term opened. 

Miss Orca Miller entertained sever- 
al of our teachers at her home in 
Mechanicsburg. They enjoyed the 
Lovefeast held on Oct. 8 at the Moh- 
ler meeting-house, Lower Cumber- 
land District. 

The Physical Culture Classes are 
doing good work. They have goodly 
numbers enrolled. This Is especial- 
ly true of the ladies. 

Basket ball season Is here. A 



OUR COLLEGE flMKS 



committee has been appointed to de- 
cide on rules which shall regulate 
the game. 

Miss Lottie Nagle stopped to visit 
friends at the College on her re- 
turn to Philadelphia, after spending 
a few weeks with her sister at 
Tyrone. 

M. M. 

Elder D. L. Miller, of Mt. Morris, 
111., conducted Chapel exercises for 
us on Wednesday, Oct. 12. He was 
called on for a speech and responded 
with words of sound advice and en- 
couragement. Following are a few 
epigrams culled from his speech: 

"The man without God is like a 
cipher with the rim knocked off." 
"Education should bring us closer to 
God." 

"Make the most of your school 
opportunities remembering every 
moment that you are preparing for 
life." 

"Have a high ideal before you." 
"Don't get the idea that your educa- 
tion is to be a money making 
scheme." 

"Don't get the idea that your edu- 
cation is to be an end in itself. It 
is a means to an end." 

"The following inscription over an 
ancient gate-way in Europe express- 
es a sublime truth, which we should 
all ponder: 'Pleasure is but mo- 
mentary; trouble is but momentary; 
only the things that are eternal are 
important.' " 

"Go after things and they will 
come to you. Continual and unceas- 
ing toil is the secret of success. The 
world has no time for the man who 
will not work." 

"Depend on yourself. Tlif work 
that you do by your own effort is the 
work that counts." 

H. S. F. 



Exchanges 

The Exchanges, though somewhat 
more in number than last month, are 
not all here. If this matter has 
been overlooked we hope the editor 
will see to it that we receive their 
paper. It is with pleasure that we 
note the following: "Lordsburg Col- 
lege Educator" for September; "Heb- 
ron Star", "College Rays", "Ursinus 
Weekly" and Friendship Banner" 
for October. 

"If there is one benefit above all 
others to be gained from athletics, 
it is to go into things hard; and this 
can be applied to religious work as 
well as on the baseball diamond. It 
teaches a man to be whole-hearted, 
not to let up until he has carried 
the thing through." 

— College Rays. 

"There is a school of yet greater 
power and opportunity — a school of 
much greater responsibility — which 
is not catalogued with educational 
institutions in the reckoning of men. 
But God founded it to be the world's 
supreme educational institution. 
What about your home? Are you 
buying the future for God and righ- 
teousness in your home?" 

— Lordsburg College Educator. 
W. F. E. 



Lecture Course. 

From the Eli/.abetotown Chronicle. 

The third lecture course to be giv- 
en at Elizabethtown College has just 
been arranged for. In addition to a 
few representatives who have ap- 
peared on previous ronrses, several 
new lecturers are scheduled on the 
course for this year. 

On November 4th, Edward Baxter 
Perry, of Boston, Mass., will give a 
piano-lecture recital in Heisey's audi- 
torium. Mr. Perry was enthusias- 
tically received la6t year and all lov- 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



ers of music should hear him. He 
has the rare distinction of having 
played in the royal circle of Germany. 

January 12, Dr. F. J. Stanley, of 
Newburg, New York, will lecture in 
the College Chapel on "The Oriental 
Crisis of To-day." Dr. Stanley form- 
erly occupied the chair of English 
History and Literature in Waseda 
University, Tokyo, Japan. Having 
had the opportunity to study oriental 
conditions first hand a full lecture 
can be expected. 

February 9, another well known 
lecturer will be introduced to| an 
Elizabethtown audience. "The Uni- 
versity of Adversity" will be the 
theme of a lecture to be delivered by 
Dr. M. Wuary Rosselle, pastor of the 
Fifth Baptist Church, Philadelphia. 

April 20, Dr. A. B. Van Ormer, 
whose appearance on a former course 
will be recalled with pleasure, is 
scheduled for a lecture. Dr. Van 
Ormer is a man of eminent scholas- 
tic attainments being a graduate of 
Pennsylvania College and Gettysburg 
Theological Seminary. He also holds 
the degree of Doctor of Pedagogy 
from New York University and for 
several years was a graduate student 
of philosophy in the University of 
Pennsylvania. His subject will be 
"Guesscience," the theme being the 
so-called antagonism between religion 
and science. 

The closing number of the course 
will be given by the music depart- 
ment of the college in Heisey's audi- 
torium. This number will consist 
of sacred music, likely a cantata of 
religious setting. It will be render- 
ed May 19. 

A course made up of such able 
representatives of the musical world 
and the lyceum should appeal to all 
friends of true education. Course 
tickets have been provided, to be sold 
at |1.25. For the first number sin- 



gle admission will be 50 cents; for 
the other numbers 40 cents. 



The annual chestnut outing was 
held at Conewago Junction on Sat., 
Oct. 15. Through the kindness of 
Mr. and Mrs. Earhart, the students 
and teachers were permitted to en- 
joy the day midst the beautiful and 
peaceful surroundings of S. G. Gray- 
bill's farm. One of the interesting 
features was the banquet on the 
iawn. Although the chestnuts 

seemed to be a negligble quantity, 
everybody seemed to enjoy the games 
on the lawn, and the picturesque 
scenery along the Conewago. 

H. S. F. 



THANKS. 

On Saturday, October 22nd, there was 
brought to us by the drayman a barrel 
containing about three bushels of fine 
large, Kiefer pears. No card accompan- 
ied the donation, but Mrs. Keber on 
reversing the paper on which tbecollege 
addres3 was written found the name 
of Mrs. Jesse Ziegler, Koyersford, Pa. 
This let the cat out the bag. We extend 
our sincerest thanks to Klder Zeigler 
and his wife for their generosity. 



Sending Out Smiles 
I have some little enemies — 

They call themselves "the Blues." 
And like all other kind of foes 

They're splendid things to lose. 
So when I know they're planning 

To come and spend the day, 
I send the little smiles out 

To chase them all away. 

— Mabel Hunt. 



Howard I'.il nor of Johnstown, renewed 
old acquaintance on the hill recently. 
He expects to be a student again next 
Spring. 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



17 



Does It? Is It? What? 

It always has been a puzzle to me 
What sailors sow when they plow the 

sea. 
When a storm is brewing, what does 

it brew? 
Does the foot of a mountain wear a 

shoe? 
Have you ever pursued a volume of 

smoke? 
Can butter be made from the cream 

of a joke? 
Can you fasten a door with a lock of 

hair? 
Did a biting wind ever bite you, and 

where? 
Who is it that paints the signs of the 

times? 
Does the moon change her quarters 

for nickles and dimes? 
What tune do you play on the feel- 
ings, pray? 
And who is it mends the break of 

day? 
And say — I'll admit this is quite 

absurd — 
When you drop a remark, do you 

break your word? 
Can a rope be made out of ocean 

strands? 
Have the silent midnight watches 

hands? 
Can money be tight when change is 

loose? 
■Now what in all the world is the use 
Of going through college and taking 

degrees 
When we're posed by such little pro 

blems as these? 

Bassett's Scrap Book 



In a letter to the editor Phares B 
Gibble writes: "Our home is on Maple 
Avenue, Annville, Pa. We extend to 
all our friends a hearty invitation to visi 
us." Our readers perhaps remember 
that Mr. Gibble was married last June, 
He is now attending school at Lebanon 
Valley College, which is located a 
Annville. 



Latest Happenings. 

The silver knives, which were ordered 
last August, reached the college, Thurs- 
day, October 27th. Many thanks to all 
friends who so kindly contributed to- 
ward a fund which made it possible lor 
us to have them. 

Trustees. II. Hertzler served as read- 
ing clerk at the Ministerial meeting held 
at Ephrata, and Prof. Ober was. elected 
treasurer at the same meeting. 

Dr. Reber's brother and wife, Mr. and 
Mrs. George W. Reber, of Blue Jay, W. 
Va., visited friends in and about the 
College on October 27 and 28. Mrs. 
Reber's son, Mr. Fred Burgess, is a stu- 
dent in the Commercial course with us. 
They were accompanied by their daugh- 
ter, Miss Johnnie Burgess 

Dr. Mary Preston of The Preston 
House, Wernersville, Pa., -has engaged 
boarding and lodging at College for the 
Bible Term to be held in December. 

Prospects for attendance during the 
Winter term are bright. One of the 
latest applicants for a room is J. Monroe 
Danner of Abbottstown, Pa. 

We were pleased also to entertain for 
a short time in October Miss Sallie 
Mentzer of E|>hrata w hose nephew, Ivan 
Mentzer, is a student here. 



Thanksgiving. 

For the earth and all its beauty, 

The sky and all its light; 
For the dim and soothing shadows 

That rest the dazzled siiht; 
For unfading fields and prairies 

Where sense in vain has trod: 
For the world's exhaustless beauty 

I thank Thee, O my God! 



If interested in College work send for 
Catalogue. 



Religions Services 

Regular Preaching Services: — 

Sept. 2 5th, 7.30 p. m. — Sermon by 
G. Falkenstein. Subject: "A 
Call to the Young." Text, 1 
John 2:13, 15. 

Oct. 2 — Services recalled on ac- 
count of S. S. Meeting in town. 

Oct. 9, 7.30 p. m. — Sermon by Eld. 
D. L. Miller. Subject: "God's 
Best." Text, Josh. 9:7-21. 

Oct. 16, 10 a. m. — Sermon by Rev 
Maderi. Subject: "Who Shall 
Stand?" Text, Rev. 6:17. 
Mid Week Prayer Meeting: — 

Sept. 2 8 — Orca Miller. 

Oct. 5 — Miss Elizabeth Meyer. 

Oct. 12 — Ed. Hertzler. 

Oct. 17 — T. S. Carper. 
Sunday Bible Classes: — 
Every Sunday at S.15. 
Mark, taught by Miss Stauffer. 
International S. S. Lessons, by 
Prof. J. G. Meyers. 
Missionary Reading Circle: — 

Teacher, Miss Stauffer. 

Reading— ^"Modern Apostles in 
Missionary By-ways." 



A number of College folks attended 
the Ministerial Meeting held at Ephrata 
on October 26 and 27. 

.Miss Myer expects to attend the An- 
nual County Sunday School Convention 
to be held at Millersvilleon November 3. 
She is invited to he present at the Home 
Department Conference to take place 
during the lunch hour. 



Hirsh & Bro. 

Centre Square. Next to City Hall 
LANCASTER, PA. 

Si ilc Agents for the Famous 
Michaels-Stern U e a d y-t o 
Wear Suits and Oven-oats, 
Men's furnishings and Tail- 
oring. Plain Clothing a 
Specialty. Strictly one Price 
to All. 



"The House of Good 
Clothes." 



Men's and 

Young Men's 

Soft and Derby 

HATS 




The new Fall styles are 
coming in daily and include 
all the popular and staple 
shapes, including a full range l.\ 
and sizes of Plain Hats with 
various sizes in brim and 
crown. Our prices start as 
low as 50c. and in the bet- 
ter grades at SI 00, $1 50, 
$2 00. $3 00. 83 50. and 
$4 00. We boast of having 
the choicest the market af- 
fords. We sell Quality and 
Comfort. 



S. M. Meyer & Co. 

CLOTHING. HATS 

AND FURNISHINGS. 
12 East Kino Street 

LANCASTER, PENN'A 



lh© Book Store ° n - faekenstein 
Bibles, 38oofcs, &tationci\>, post Cauos 



M 



EL1ZABETHTOWN 

ROLLER MILLS 

J. F. BIXKELV, Fropr. 
Manufacturer of Best Grades of 

FLOUR & FEED 

Use Binkley's Celebrate:! Mash Food 

It Malces Hens Lay. 
ELIZABETHTOWX, - PEXXA. 



JOHN C. BARBERIAN 

randXice^rigl.t. 

IANHF.IM STREE1 



Mrs. S. Hornafins' Confectionery 



POORMAN'S BAKERY 

Choice Bread. Rolls and Cakes. 
HUMMELSTOWN STREET 



E. H. LEHMAN 



Co 



SEWER PIPE, 
ETC. 



WOOD, GRAIN 
FLOUR, FEED 



A L 



Telephone 
ELIZABETHTOWX, - PEXXA 



FURNITURE 



THE MOST COMPLETE AM) UP- 
TO-DATE LINE IX THIS SECTIOX 
OF THE COUNTRY. 

F. C. FISHER 



ELIZABETHTOWX, 



A. W. MARTIN 

COAL. Wool). GRAIN 
FLOUR and FEED 



ELIZABETHTOWX, - PEXXA. 

S. G. HERSHEY 

Groceries, Dry 

Goods and 

Notions. 

ELIZABETHTOWX, - PEXXA. 



S. P. ENGLE 



S. Market & Bainbridge Sts. 



DRY GOODS, NOTIONS, FOOT- 
WEAR, CARPETS, LINOLEUMS 
AND OIL CLOTHS. 

ELIZABETHTOWX, PA. 



Jos. D. Hollinger, 

ROOFING & SPOUTI-.G 
HOT AIR FURNACKS 



Breeder of bull 'prose 

Irizr- Winning 

Light Brahmas 

Elizabethtown Pa. 



Go To 

HERB'S BOOK STORE 

1 12-11 t X. Queen St., Lancaster, Pa. 

— for — 

BOOKS AND STATIONERY 

PENNANTS PRINTING 



Bell. 9-5. Hours 8 to 

I)lt. JEROME G. HKSS 
DENTIST 
Hertzler Bldg. Elizabethtown Pi 



AMERICAN STEM) AND POLL/TRY 

FENCE 

JOS. H. RIDER ca, SON 



£. L RENSEL 

Generiil Blacksmi thing 
and Bepair Work 
Horse-Shoeing a Specialty. 

Park St., Elizabethtown, Pa. 



J. RALPH GROSS 

THE BABBEB 

Fli/abethtown, - - I'emiii 



JNO. M. SHOOKERS 
WATCHMAKER AND JEWELER 

5 yrs. with L. Weber & Son 

Lancaster, Pa. 

Elizabethtown, - - I'enna. 



Bell & Ind. Phones 

The Lancaster Mail Order House 

Dealers in 

New and Old Books 
East Oian-e St.. Lancaster, 1 a 



For All Kinds of 
FARMING IMPLEMENTS 



Geise & McBrids 
ELIZABETHTOWN, - PENNA. 



BISHOP'S STUDIO 

Photos of All Styles. 

Framing Neatly Execated 

Center Square, Elizabethtown, Penna 



ELIZABETHTOWN 



Dental fl>arlor8 



I. HEINDEL. Dentist. 







IP 


1, 


-Date SI 


oe Repairing 




w 


e 


Guara 


itee 


Vnu 


the Best Service 










and 


Materials 




s. 


K 


. IS; 


i n 


w a 


Son 


Smith Markc 


St. 



I 1VF \ND TEN OENT STORE! 

It is really wonderful what a few 
pennies will buy in our ."i and 1<> 
cent store an 1 every article is useful 
about the house. Nothing in tin- 
store is priced for more than 10c and 
from that down to lc # 
KI.IZAISFTHTOWN. - PENNA, 



O. N. HEISEY 

Provisions, Groceries C& Choice Candies 



HEISEY IU TI.DIXG 



KI.IZAItKTIITOWX, 1'F.NNA. 



ChristmaS 

We Have The Most Complete L,ine You Ever Sa 

We HERALD BOOK STORE, l M 



Booklets, Calendars, Calendar Pads, 
I'o-l Car. Is, Stickers, Tags, Folders, 
Holly Crepe Taper, Christmas Station- 
ery, Story Hooks, Holly Boxes, Etc. 



A. SHIFFER' 
opr. 



GET MY PRICES ON 

Building Material 

PAINTS, ETC. 

before purchasing. Will be 
pleased to quote on anything 
in the Hardware line. Edi- 
son Phonographs, Sporting 
Goods, Kodak supplies, etc. 

GEO. A. FISHER 

EIJZABETHTOWN, - PENNA. 



/. E. BELSER 

For Rooting, Spouting, Tin and 
Granite Ware, Milk Cans, Radi- 
ators, Portable Furnaces, Granite 
hisk Roasters in lour sizes, or 
any special orders in ray line. 
Give me a trial. 



Opp. Exchange Bank 

ELIS5ABETHTOWN, - PENNA. 

SUBSCRIBE FOR 

OUR COLLEGE TIMES 
50c. PER YEAR 

0. C. RENSEL 

Choice Bread, Rolls 
& Cakes of All Kinds 

Prompt Delivery. 

S. Market St. 

ELIZABETHTOWN, - PENNA. 



KUHN'S 

CHOICE BREAD AND 
CAKES 

Weddings and parties supplied 
with Fancy Cakes at short 
notice. South Market Street. 

BMZABETHTOWN, - PENNA. 



Harry Miller 

Furniture & Undertaking 

Furniture Repairing & Upholstering 
Picture Framing 

Bell Phone 



i :i j/.i ixditow ii. 



Penna. 



G. WM. REISNER 

Manufacturing Jeweler, Class and 
Fraternity Fins, Pennants, Banners 

Lancaster, Penna. 



An early start, a steady pace, 
Is our way to win the race. 
We would advise those who can, 
Adopt a system, work the plan. 

Modern methods, nowadays. 
Are commendable in many ways 

AT NISSLKYS 
LUNCH AND DINING ROOMS 

14-16 E. Chestnut St., Lancaster, Pa. 



ELIZABETHTOWN COLLEGE FACULTY 



D. C. REBER, A. M. Pd. D., President 

Philosophy, Pedagogy, German. 
H. K. OBER, Pd. B., Vice President, 

Biological Science, Agriculture, 

Surveying. 
ELIZABETH MYER, M. E., 

Elocution and Grammer. 
B. F. WAMPLER, B. E., 

Director of Music, Voice Culture. 
FLORA GOOD WAMPLER, 

Piano, Organ, Harmony. 
J. G. MEYER, Pd. B., A. B., 

Mathematics, Physical Science, 

History. 

MARY E. MARKLEY, A. M., 

English, Latin and French. 

J. Z. HERR Prin. Commercial Dep't, 
Bookkeeping, Penmanship, Com- 
mercial Law. 



JACOB S. HARLEY, A. B., 

Geography, History and Civics. 

LYDIA STAUFFER, 
English Bible. 

LEAH M. SHEAFFER, Pd. B., 

Piano, Organ, Drawing, Physi- 
cal Culture. 

R. W. SCHLOSSER, Pd. B., 
Latin and Algebra. 

ELIZABETH KLINE, 

Piano, English Branches. 

ANNA W. WOLGEMUTH, 

Shorthand and Typewriting. 
DAISY P. RIDER, Pd. B., 

(Absent on Leave.) 
LAURA B. HESS, 

Sewing. 
ELD. S. H. HERTZLER, 

Exegesis (Bible Term). 



Contents 

Agricultural Department ...... 13 

Alumni Notes ........ 10 

Editorial ......-- 3 

Exchanges - - - - - - - - - 11 

Growth of Eli/.abethtown ....-- 4 

How to Treat the Aged ....... 8 

Latest Happenings ....--- 13 

Literary ......... 7 

Literary Society News ------- 11 

Locals ....----- 9 

Religious Appointments ...... H 

School News - - - - - - - 9 

Tenth Anniversary ....--- 12 

The Annual Bible Term ........ 6 

The Footpath lo Peace ...... :i 

The Red Cross Stamp 7 

What it Means to be a College Student ... - 7 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



ELIZABKTHOWN, PA., DECEMBER, 1910. 



EDITORIAL STAFF: 



HOLMES FALKENSTEIN, A 
LEAH M. SHEAFFER, Alumn 
B. F. WALTZ, Society News 



ELIZABETH MVER, Edit 



W. SCHLOSSER, Busine 



-in-Chief 

WALTER F. ESHLEMAN, Exchanges 
MAZIE MARTIN. Locals 
GERTRUDE MILLER, Stenographer 
Manager 



Our College Tib 
The paper will be : 

Report changes of 
Terms: Fifty can 
Entered at the Po; 



August and September. 

i as not to break their files, and arrearages charged, 



:s is published monthly, except in 

nt contiuous'y to old subscribers, s 

me has been received at expiration. 

ddress, and failure to receive this paper regularly, to the Business Manager. 

; per year, 10 cents monthly. 



: Second-Class Matter, April 19, 1909. 



EDITORIAL 

Keeping Christmas. 

(By Helen A. Hawley) 
To take the Child within your heart 
And make Him of your life a part. 

Is keeping Christmas. 
To Open wide the Heart's closed 



Vud 



iping Christmas. 



As we approach Christinas tide, 
we greet our friends with best wish- 
es for a Joyous Christmas and a 
Happy Xew Year. 

We co-incide heartily with the 
thought expressed in the following 
paragraph taken from the Xew Cen- 
tury S. S. Teachers' Monthly: 

"Down below the impulse to give 
at Christmas time is a strong under- 
current of gratitude for the great 
Gift of God: we really magnify and 
glorify our own giving as we let it 
be a token of deep, reverent appre- 
ciation of this Christgift. So, also. 
we can add brightness to the season, 



hallow its meaning a little more as 
we take thought and let ourselves 
feel the blessedness of receiving 
from others, appreciate the love 
spirit that fills their hearts and 
prompts them to remember us with 
gifts. As we receive we may re- 
member tenderly that it is Christ's 
spirit shining upon us out of others' 
hearts when they offer us the gifts 
liny have prepared." 

As we go to press with our mater- 
ial for the December number of our 
College Times, the Fifty-ninth Ses- 
sion of the Lancaster County Teach- 
ers' Institute opens in the Martin 
auditorium, Lancaster, Pa. It causes 
us deep regret to learn that Prof. 
M. J. Brecht, on account of illness, 
is not able to preside at the sessions 
of this great Institute. During the 
twenty-nine years of Iris superintend- 
ency, he has not missed one Institute. 
Prof. Brecht has been a great friend 
to us in the true sense of the word, 
and we are especially interested in 
his welfare. We wish him all the 
comfort possible during his illness 
and hope he may be speedily restor- 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



ed to health. 

Up to noon on Monday, December 
14th, almost seven hundred teachers 
had enrolled for the Institute. The 
principle instructors for this year 
are, — Dr. S. Y. Gillan, Dr. P. W. 
Cooley, Dr. Van Ormer, and Dr. 
Gordinier. 

Growth of Elizabethtown 

Elizabethtown was laid out by 
Barnabas Hughes, June 13, 1753 
and named in honor of his wife, 
Elizabeth. This village grew grad- 
ually from year to year, and by 1826 
the population had increased so 
much that its residents deemed it ex- 
pedient to have a municipal govern- 
ment organized. Petition was con- 
sequently made to the Legislature, 
and on April 13, 1827, an act was 
passed incorporating the borough 
of Elizabethtown. It was the third 
borough incorporated in the county. 

Its growth was not so marked in 
thrift and industry for a number of 
years; and persons coming here in 



1900 were surprised at finding so 
small a place, since it had been in- 
corporated as early as 1827; but its 
growth in ten years (from 1900 to 
1910) was marvelous, as will be seen 
from the following article taken from 
the Elizabethtown Chronicle: — 

The population of this borough is 
2588, a gain of 1115 since 1900. 
This is a good showing, as the bor- 
ough nearly doubled its population 
inside of ten years. In Lancaster city 
the gain was 5770. Columbia show- 
ed a loss of 8G5, and Marietta of 390. 
The aggregate gains of the boroughs 
is 4306, which added to Lancaster 
city's increase of 5770, makes an 
increase of 10,076 in the city and 
boroughs. As the population of 
the entire county shows an increase 
of only 7761 there has been a de- 
cline in the population of the strict- 
ly rural sections of 2 315. 

Following is the population of 
boroughs of Lancaster county with 
a comparison with the census of 
1900, showing gains and losses: 



Boroughs 1910 

Adamstown 675 . 

Akron 719 . 

Christiana 934 

Columbia 11451 . 

Quarryville 739 5( 

Elizabethtown 2588 141 



1900 
597 
653 
82S 
12316 



Ephrata 



3192 2451 



!Hi2 

:> 1 6 



('.ah 



741 

•1 1 5 



Lititz 2082 . . . 

Manheim 2202 2019 183 

Marietta 2079 2469 

Mnuntville S03 ... 

Mt. Joy 2166 ... 

New Holland 1106 ... 

Strasburg 883 . . . 

Terre Hill 882 ... 

Washington Boro 560 . . . 

Denver 933 . . . 



803 

1 is 
204 



Total 33994 2968S "■'ill 1305 

Elizabethtown has a number of The Kreider Shoe Manufacturing 
large factories. Among them are, — Company, which alone employs three 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



hundred and fifty hands; A. Buch's 
Sons Co., manufacturers of Farm Im- 
plements, Lawn Swings, etc., employ- 
ing one hundred hands; a large Shirt 
Factory, employing forty hands; The 
Martin & Heagy Handle and Bending 
Works, twenty-five hands; Lancas- 
ter Scale Co., twenty hands; Elmer 
P. Morris Co., twenty hands; The 
Farmers' Fertilizer Works, ten hands 
It also has a large Roller Process 
Flouring Mill, Electric Light Plant, 
Town Water Supply, Gas Plant and 
two Telephone Exchanges. It has 
excellent Fire Protection — Strong 
Water Pressure, as well as a Steam 
Fire Engine. It has a Chartered 
Board of Trade, Business Men's As- 
sociation and Board of Health. 

All this shows that Elizabethtown 
is one of the most thriving and en- 
terprising towns in the county. 

We were pleased to have with us 



on the occasion of the Anniversary 
of the Founding of our College, Nov. 
14, Dr. S. E. Weber, of State Col- 
lege, Pa., and Elder D. L. Miller, 
of Mt. Morris, 111. Elder Miller 
gave to us from his wealth of ex- 
perience and information, splendid 
advice concerning the development 
of the three-fold powers of man, — 
physical, intellectual, and spiritual. 
Dr. Weber in his remarks to the 
audience, paid a glowing tribute to 
the Dunkard Brethren (as he called 
them) for the part they contributed 
toward the civilization of Pennsylva- 
nia and to the United States in gen- 
eral. He specially emphasized the 
fact that the Christopher Sower 
Press located at Germantown ex- 
erted great influence along educa- 
tional lines through the Bibles, 
Hymn Books, and Almanacs which 
it circulated in America early in the 
eighteenth century. 



THE ANNUAL BIBLE TERM 



The Annual Bible Term is near at 
hand. Heretofore we have usual- 
ly held the Bible Term sometime in 
January, but this year it will be held 
in December. It will open on Thurs. 
December Sth and will continue un- 
til December 18. Let everyone 
take in the entire term. 

Boarding and lodging for the ten 
days will be $5.00. For less than 
the full term GO cents per day. 
Those not lodging at the College 
will be expected to contribute (say 
$1.00) towards defraying the ex- 
penses of the special teachers. Con- 
tributions from the others, for the 
same purpose will be appreciated. 
Single meal tickets at College dining- 
room, 20 cents. Lodging per sin- 
gle night, 15 cents. 

A limited amount of room at the 



College is available for Bible term 
students. Those desiring to lodge 
at the College should apply at once 
stating when they are coming and 
how long they intend to stay. All 
accounts are to be settled with Prof. 
J. Z. Herr, Treasurer. On arriving 
at the depot, take Pierce's hack for 
the College. Bring Brethren Hymnal 
Bible, towel, soap, and a woolen 
blanket (if the weather is very cold). 
For further information, address 
D. C. Reber. Please note the fol- 
lowing Daily, and Special Programs: 
DAILY PROGRAM 

Morning. 

9.00 — Chapel Exercises. 
9.20 — Epistle of James, G. M. 
Lauver. 

10.00 — Romans, S. H. Hertzler. 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



10.40 — Matthew's Gospel, J. K. 
Miller. 

11.20 — Parables, G. M. Lauver. 
Afternoon. 

1.40 — Epistle to Ephesians, J. K. 
Miller. 

2.20 — Prayer, G. M. Lauver. 

3.00 — Sunday School Work-4 les- 
sons, H. K. Ober; Bible Geography, 
3 lessons, Lydia Stauffer. 

3.40 — Vocal Music, B. F. Wampler 
Evening. 

6.45 — Song Service, B. F. Wamp- 
ler. 

7.00 — Sermon, Eld. G. M. Lauver. 



2. By whom should Sunday 
School teachers be appointed? 

3. Should visitors be invited to 
teach ? 

-!. What are the Superintendent's 
duties between Sundays? 

5. Who should look alter the ab- 
sent pupils? 

C. The Cradle Roll: its object 
and methods? 

Regular speakers, 10 minutes. 

General discussion, two minute 
speeches. 

Everybody come prepared to give 
a good thought on the subjects. 



EDUCATIONAL PROGRAM 

Dec. 10, 2 p. m. 
Moderator — Dr. D. C. Reber 

Devotional — Eld. J. Kurtz Miller. 

Music. 

The Importance of Biology in Edu- 
cation.Dr. R. C. Scheidt. 

Music. 

The Religious Aspect of Educa- 
tion, Dr. D. W. Kurtz. 

Round Table, Eld. G. M. Lauver. 

Music, Ladies' Chorus. 

SUNDAY-SCHOOL PROGRAM 
Dec. 11, 2 p. m.. College Chapel 

Moderator — A. G. Longenecker. 

Devotional Exercises, Harry Moh- 
ler. 

How to interest and keep the 
young people in Sunday School be- 
tween the ages ( of 14 and 20? Eld. 
J. Kurtz Miller. 

Methods of Conducting Primary 
Work, Mrs. G. X. Falkenstein. 

Tlie duties of the pastor and his 
wife to the Sunday School. Nathan 
Martin. 

A well organized Sunday School, 
Eld. G. M. Lauver. 

Round Table. 

1. Should we have some one talk 
to the Sunday School every Sunday? 



MISSIONARY PROGRAM 

Dec. 17., 2 p. in. 
Moderator — H. K. Ober. 

Devotional. S. Z. Wit aer. 

Song. 

How can we aid in Supplying the 
Demand lor Workers? Leah M 

Shaeffer. 

Song. 

China an open Field lor the Breth- 
ren. Martha Martin. 

Our duty towards the Unoccupied 
Territory of Eastern Penna., Jesse 
Ziegler. 

Song. 

Round Table. 

Missionary Offering. 

Fifteen minutes assigned each reg- 
ular speaker. 



Hon. II. Frank Kshleman Comptroller 
of Lancaster County, gave to the College 

library ami friends of the school. -i\ 
copies ol his excellent address which 
he delivered on September 8, 1910 at 
Willow Street, Lancaster County on the 
occasion of the observance of the 200th 
Anniversary of the Kirst Settlement in 
Lancaster County. This settlement was 
Hans Hen in 1711). The Col- 
lege expresses it« high appreciation of 
erous gill on the part of Mr. 
Eshleman. 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



LITERARY 

Building 

What builds the nation's pillars 
high 

And its foundations strong? 
What makes it mighty to defy 

The foes that 'round it throng? 
Not gold, but only men can make 

A people great and strong, 
Men who, for truth and honor's sake 

Stand fast and suffer long. 
Brave men who work while others 
sleep, 

Who dare while others fly — 
They build a nation's pillars deep 

And lift them to the sky. — 

—Emerson. 

The Red Cross Stamp 

If you're writing home today, 
Think of all there is to say 
Of the kindly Christmas feeling 
Gently o'er your heartstrings steal- 
ing; 
And, to help your heart feel better, 
Red Cross Stamp the old home let- 
ter! 
If it's business, what you will, 
When as page by page you fill 
With the bright thoughts of the 

season, 
Give your better nature reason 
To rejoice, with one more thought 
Of the Red Cross Stamps you've 

bought! 
If it's to the one you love, 
Then, all other things above, 
It will with its spirit blend 
In her heart to hold you better 
Than a brother or a friend, 
If you Red Cross Stamp the letter! 

— Baltimore Sun. 

What it Means to be a College 
Student 

The College Student is pre-emi- 
nently a seeker after truth. He 



belongs not to the aristocracy of 
wealth or of birth, but to the aris- 
tocracy of high ideals. His ideals 
distinguish him from his fellows. 
High ideals are the things that spur 
him on to success. 

Birth counts for little or nothing. 
Wealth is not essential. Excessive 
wealth has wrecked many a promis- 
ing career. The student who has 
unlimited money at his command 
loses in the race with his struggling 
brother. He is cushioned, as it 
were against the knocks and sharp 
corners of life. He is prone to 
follow the line of least resistance 
and is ruined by the very thing he 
most relied on. With the student 
who lacks wealth the struggle is 
all the harder and the final victory 
all the grander. Emerson referred 
to poverty as "the hoop that holds 
men staunch." 

Statistics show that the majority 
of American college students are 
working their way in whole or in 
part. How fortunate it is that edu- 
cation does not depend on birth or 
wealth. "A man's a man for a' that." 
But high ideals are fundaments!!* 
and essentially necessary. That is 
what it means to be a college stu- 
dent. The student is not asked wh( re 
he comes from but in what directii-'i) 
he is going. What is his purpose., 
his ideals? 

Even China is sending, at govern- 
ment expense, hundreds of young 
Chinese to this country to catch 
the ideals and spirit of our colleges. 
This should be a lesson to us, wheth- 
er we are attending school or con- 
template attending in the future. 

The college student is an inevitable 
product of our civilization. The 
bird or the animal needs but to imi- 
tate the few simple motions of the 
parent and, in a short time, its train- 
ing for life is completed. The edu- 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



cation of our savage ancestors was 
almost as simple. The care of 
flocks and herds or the handling 
of weapons of war and the chase 
was handed down from father to 
son. It is not so with the marvel- 
lous civilization of the Twentieth 
Century. The complex life of the 
present age demands a high degree 
of efficiency. The man of today 
knows more than the man of yester- 
day, and the man of tomorrow must 
know more than the man of today. 

The college student realizes this 
fact, else he would not be in college. 
He cheerfully sacrifices present gain 
for future good. He goes through 
a course of studies to train his mind. 
He comes in contact with men of 
broad training and experience and 
he sets up for himself a high ideal, 
a lofty purpose in life. 

It is not so much learning itself 
as the spirpit of learning that he 
gets at college. He goes out into 
the world a seeker after truth; he 
does not get his views and ideas 
second hand, but guides his life 
by the truth as he sees it. He lives 
"not to be ministered unto but to 
minister." His college spirit stays 
-with him through life. On his 
tombstone we would not expect to 
find the inscription, "He knew all 
things," but "He died learning." 

Holmes Falkenstein. 

How to Treat the Aged 

(A Composition Exercise.) 
The treatment of the aged should 
always be kind, gentle and consider- 
ate. We should be kind to them 
because they have had many trials 
and cares and by our kindness we 
may help to lighten their cares. We 
should be gentle in our manner of 
speaking to them, and we should al- 
ways be considerate of their feel- 



Is it not easy to say a kind word 
or give a bright cheery smile when 
we meet the old folks, as it is to 
pass them without speaking to them? 
They will remember your kindness 
long after you have forgotten all a- 
bout it. 

If they are sick we should try to 
make the long hours pass as pleas- 
antly as possible. If they are in 
trouble, sympathize with them. Try 
to let them see that you are interest- 
ed in them and are anxious to help 
them when ever you can. 

Sometimes we get a little impatient 
with the aged and speak to them in 
a harsh manner. This makes them 
feel as though they had no right to 
say or do anything. It seems sad 
to me when an aged person feels 
that he is always in the way. 

So many children seem so ungrate- 
ful to their parents. T n many cas- 
es the scenes are something like 
this: — 

The first scene is in a quiet home 
in the country. it is evening and 
the family is gathered around the 
fireside. Two little childn n are 
playing in the room guarded by kind, 
loving parents. It is a happy con- 
tented group. 

In the next scene the father, who 
was so loving and kind, is dead and 
the '. Hither is without a home. You 
say, ■Where are her children?" 
They are making a home for them- 
selves and do not have room for tne 
one who did so much for them. 
Mow can anyone lie so ungrateful'' 

lie old folks may not be with us 
long . so lei u^ in- patient w itii them 
and make their last days bright and 
happy. If we are no; rewarded by 
the bright look on their faces, per- 
haps ii we live to grow old someone 

Will he kind to us 

RHODA E. MII.LKK. 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



The Footpath to Peace 
To be glad of life, because it gives 
you the chance to love and to work 
and to play and to look up at the 
stars; be satisfied with your posses- 
sions, but not contented with your- 
self until you have made the best 
of them; to despise nothing in the 
world except falsehood and mean- 
ness, and to fear nothing except 
cowardice; to be governed by your 
admirations rather than by your dis- 
gusts; to covet nothing that is your 
neighbors except his kindness of 
heart and gentleness of manners; 
to think seldom of your enemies, of- 
ten of your friends, and every day 
of Christ: and to spend as much 
time as you can, with body an] with 
spirit, in God's out-of-doors — these 
are little guideposts on the foot- 
path to peace. — Henry Van Dyke 



SCHOOL NEWS 



Locals 

Already anticipations of the Christ- 
mas Holidays brighten the dark 
clouds of impending examinations. 

Eleven Mountain Cedar trees were 
recently donated to the College by 
a former student, V. C. Holsinger, of 
Shellytown, Pa. 

The Physical Culture Program ren- 
dered on Wednesday afternooon, 
Nov.- 2, gave us many practical hints. 
Blessed is he who puts his know- 
ledge into practice. 

Miss Marion G. Spangler, of Col- 
legeville, Pa., spent a few days at the 
College as the guest of Miss Markley. 

The singing classes at Ephrata 
and Landisville conducted by Prof. 
Wampler are doing good work. us - 

The geraniums which added Miss 

brightness to the campus during the visited 



summer, have been distributed to the 
rooms and are well cared for. 

Don't forget December eighth, and 
the ten days following, — ie., Bible 
Term. Programs are ready for dis- 
tribution. 

The recital by Baxter Perry, Nov. 
1, was as enthusiastically received 
by those who had heard him for the 
second time as by those who had 
never heard him before. 

The interest in Basket Ball in- 
creases as the Frost King exerts his 
authority around College Hill. 

Mr. H. L. Smith and sister Emma 
of Farrisburg, paid us a short visit 
on Nov. 4 and 5. 

Miss Pheaffer spent Saturday and 
Sunday, Nov. 12 and 13, at the home 
of Mr. Frank Carper, at Palmyra, 
the latter being one of her indus- 
trious music students. 

The Seniors' First Social, Nov. 5, 
forms a red letter day in their calen- 
dar. 

How we rejoiced at the return of 
the electric current, after being com- 
pelled to use kerosene for about a 
week. 

Prof. Ober will attend the first ses- 
sion of the Literary Society of the 
Messiah Bible School, at Harrisburg, 
on Friday, Nov. IS and Miss Sarah 
Wenger will recite, "The Little Mar- 
tyr of Smyrna" on that occasion. 

Oct. 29, Miss Minnie Ziegler of 
Royersford, Md., visited her sister 
Mary, who is a student here. 

A former student, Mr. Wm. Christ- 
man, Steelton, Dauphin Co., renewed 
old acquaintances and expressed his 
intention of spending next year with 



Elizabeth Grosh, Lititz, Pa., 
us, as the guest of Mazie 



10 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



Martin, part of Sat., Nov. 20th and 
the following Sunday. 

November 13th, is an important 
date since the year 19 00, being the 
time of the founding of our College. 
As that date fell on Sunday this year, 
a well arrange:! program was car- 
ried out on the following Monday 
evening, Nov. 14. 

•Nov. 31, Mr. Andrew Dixon. Co- 
lumbia, Pa., visited his friends and 
made arrangements to come for the 
spring term. 

On Sunday, Nov. 13, Mazie Martin 
was agreeably surprised by a visit 
from her cousin. Miss Bertha Martin, 
of Lancaster, and Miss Jane Kauff- 
man of Mt. Joy. MAZIE MARTIN. 



Alumni Notes 

Prof. Meyer's ('05) lonely hours 
will soon be cheered by the presence 
of his wife, who will come to live 
with us at the College on Dec. 1. 

Miss Elizabeth Kline, ('05 ) one 
of our teachers, spent a few days in 
New York, from Nov. 10 until Nov. 
14. She accompanied her aunt to 
New York from which place the lat- 
ter sailed as a missionary to India. 
Miss Kline spent the remaining time 
in visiting and sight-seeing. She 

visited the Brethren Mission, Dr. 
White's Bible School, Columbia Uni- 
versity, and the Mission al China- 
town. She reports a very pleasant 
trip. Among other old acquaint- 

ances she saw Mr. Geib, who is living 
in Brooklyn at p 

The loyalty of one Alumnus was 
shown a short time ago when Will 
E. Glasmire, ('07) drove from Hum- 
melsttivi n , a distance of I 

miles, in the lain, so that hi 

attend i he \nni\ er ar; exen 
his Alma Mater. 

On Saturday, Nov. 5, Miss Ella 



Young. ('09) met with an accident 
which might have proved much more 
serious than it did. although she was 
confined to her bed for severr.l weeks 
with both wrists bandaged besides 
suffering from other injuries. She 
in company with Miss Nissley, was 
driving to a school board meeting 
when the horse started to run. Miss 
Young was dragged about fcrty feet 
ei ious injurii s. A 
physician was summoned and the 
case received due attention. On ac- 
eount (if this Miss Young v. as not 
able to attend the Teachers' Institute 
at Lancaster. 

Mr. H. L. Smith, COS) r.ttended 
Dr. Perry's recital and paid a short 
visit to the College. He is at pre- 
sent engaged in teaching at the Mes- 
siah School at Harrisburg. 

The Alumni of our schc >1 now 
number one hundred and twenty- 
two. These persons are engaged in 
various fields of labor both in the 
home and in foreign countries. One 
is now in the Philippine Islands, 
another in Alaska and still another 
In far-away India. In the h inland 
Elizabethtown College is repi • nted 
by her Alumni, in tin- states of Pa., 
ryland, 
Virginia, W, Virginia, Ohio. (' dorado 
and California. 

at hin ;, others 
keep- 
ad clerk i, two 

; life claims 

are st ill trj ing 

in further tin Ir education ;. theii 

iter and elsewhere Six 

Alumni an' at present in the Paculty 

at this place, ten arc enroll) d 

Every one of these persons hould 
!„• a member of the Alumni 

tion. 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



Surely the influence of Elizabeth- 
town College is felt throughout the 
earth. Long live our Alma Mater. 
LEAH SHEAFFER 



EXCHANGES. 

The following exchanges have been 
received during the pasl month: 
"Normal Vidette," "Albright Bulle- 
tin". "Purple and White", "Juniata 
Echo", "Friendship Banner", "Lin- 
den Hall Echo", "Lordsburg College- 
Educator", and Purple and Gold" 
for October: "College Campus," 
"Hebron Star", "College Rays", and 
"Ursinus Weekly" for November. 

"Man's Inhumanity to Man", in 
"Purple and White", | ort 'ays in a:i 
excellent way the </e;vi: ;; of man 
with his fellow-beings. 

"The Constructive Imagination", 
in "College Rays," shows that we 
should look into the future for bet- 
ter things, and aspire for nobler po- 
sitions. 

"The Friendship Banner" has in- 
creased in size. The mechanical 
part of the paper should be made 
more artistic. 

"Strive to be a creator instead of 
an inheritor. Instead of wielding 
the rusty sword of valorous fore- 
fathers, forge your own weapon." 
— College Campus. 

"Our college education, if rightly 
pursued, will aid us to see what 
needs to be done, and show how to 
do it. and feel the highest pleasure 
in its accomplishment. 

— Purple and Gold. 

"Man has one thing in common 
with brutes, an animal body; but, 
he was created in the image of God. 
The beast is born with his faculties 
practically developed, while man 

has to li i if has liberty to 

go up or down, while the beast is 
neither good nor bad. In order 



that man may improve in character 
he must have an ideal before him. 
Man gets no higher than his ideal. 
In order that our characters may 
stand for something we must choose 
an infinite ideal. Christ only can 
meet our need. — Ursinus Weekly. 

Literary Society Notes 

A number of amendments have 
been made to the By-Laws and Con- 
stitution of the Keystone Literary 
Society as follows: — 

Article XI, By-Laws. — Fines. 

Sec. 1. Any member who shall 
accept an office or an appointment 
on a Committee and neglect any duty 
thereof without a reasonable excuse 
shall be fined twenty-five cents. 

Sec. 2. Any member failing to 
perform his duty on the program 
shall be fined twenty-five cents. 

Sec. 3. Regular members of fac- 
ulty who are members, or any per- 
son who is no longer a student of the 
College, but is or has been an active 
member shall not be subject to these 
fines. 

Sec. 4. Members failing to pay 
their fines shall be liable to forfeit 
their membership. 

Article V, By-Laws 

Sec. 2. The form of inauguration 
shall be as follows: By direction of 
the President, the Secretary shall call 
the roll of officers elect, and at the 
request of the President, they shall 
assemble in front of him. The 
President shall then say, "Have you 
read the Constitution and By-Laws 
relating to your respective offices?" 
The answer being given in the affir- 
mative, he shall further say, "Do 
you sincerely promise that you will 
discharge the duties of your respec- 
tive offices as set forth in the Consti- 
tution and By-Laws of the Keystone 
Literary Society, to the best of your 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



knowledge and ability?" The ans- 
wer having again been given in the 
affirmative, the President shall say: 
"By virtue of the power conferred 
upon me by the Constitution, it be- 
comes my pleasant duty to declare 
you regular officers of the Keystone 
Literary Society, which I trust you 
will serve to its welfare and your 
own honor." The President shall 
then request the officers elect to as- 
sume their duties, and the newly 
elected President shall then deliver 
his inaugural address. 

Article A*II, Constitution. 

Sec. 8. The excusing Committee 
shall consist of the President as 
Chairman, the Vice President and 
the Secretary. It shall be their du- 
ty to notify at once any member neg- 
lecting to perform his duty on pro- 
gram, on committees or as officer, of 
such fines as are specified in the By- 
Laws; to report to the society at each 
Executive Session the names of such 
members: to furnish the Treasurer 
with the list of the same for collec- 
tion. They shall grant no excuse un- 
less for sufficient reasons which ex- 
cuse must be applied for in writing 
within one week after non-perform- 
ance of duty. 

On October 28, Prof. Harley ad- 
dressed the Society on the subject of 
"Success." In his address he said: 
"What Then is Success? Charac- 
ter is success. Character alone can 
save us. None of the vicissitudes 
of life can lose it for us. Possess- 
ing character we are never caught 
napping, never at a disadvantage. 
The secret of character, and yet no 
secret at all. is to have far sight. 
"Too low he aims who aims beneath 
the stars." 

The newly elected officers are, — 
President, Jacob Myers I'll); Vice 
President, Walter Herr (11); Secre- 



tary, Orca Miller ('12); Editor. 
Laban Leiter ('11); Critic, B. F. 
Waltz (14). 

B. F. WALTZ. 



Welcome to the scholar in Politics 
and welcome in particular to Gov- 
ernor-elect, Wilson, of New Jersey! 
Our neighboring state is to be con- 
gratulate! on having chosen for its 
head such a splendid man as the 
president of Princeton Col'.oge, the 
Honorable Woodrow Wilson. Would 
there were more scholars in politics. 
They are badly needed. The elec- 
tion of men of the stamp oZ Wood- 
row Wilson spells oblivion for con- 
scienceless corporations and self- 
seeking bosses. Honor to the men 
who purchased our liberties with 
blood and honor to the men -.vho are 
fighting to make those liberties real! 
II. S. F. 



Tenth Anniversary. 

From The Elizabethtown Herald, Not 11 

In spite of unfavorable weathera large 
audience assembled in the College 
Chapel to enjoy the anniversary exer- 
cises of .Monday evening. 

Prof. Mver's historical paper was ex- 
ceedingly interesting, lie vividly de- 
scribed the infancy of the co'lege and 
the difficulties and trials of ti.ose who 
bore the heat of the battle in establish- 
ing this institution of learning in our 
mi. 1st. He produced a numtei ofdust 
covered catalogues and programs and 
thereby recalled nianv pleasant memo- 
ries of days gone by. 

The recitations by Miss liebekab 
Sbeaffer reflected credit to herself and 
to the department of elocution of the 
College. 

The address by D. L. Miller a! ounded 
in good advice. No one can deny that 
Kev. Miller is «ell qualified, by training 
and experience, to sound advice. Be 
emphasised the necessity for education 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



in this age of progress. Spiritual, men- 
tal and physical education should go 
hand in band. None should be neglect- 
ed or developed at the expense of the 
others. The students were advised to 
remember the parents who are praying 
and sacrificing for the wellfare of their 
children. He deplored the rejection of 
the Bible in public schools and eloquent- 
ly pleaded for more Bible study at 
college. 

The scholarly speech of Dr. Weber, of 
State College, was much appreciated. 
He said that the man without a thor- 
ough education is handicapped for life. 
He paid tribute to the famous Sower 
Press, of Germantown, which was a pow- 
erful influence for good not only in the 
church of the Brcthern, but in all the 
German homes in Colonial America. He 
said we need to combat the growing 
evils of the day by placing more empha- 
sis on religious education. 

The music under the leadership of 
l'rof. Warn pier, was up to the usual high 
standard. 



Latest Happenings. 

Dr. Keber and a number of Pedagog- 
ical students attended the Teachers' 
Institute held at Lancaster from Nov- 
ember 14th to November 18th. 

Prof, ami Mrs. Ober attended a Love- 
. feast at Hatfield on Saturday, Novem- 
ber ll'. They remained in Montgomery 
County heveral days, visiting in the 
homes of George Light, Martha Cassel 
Light, Mary Cassel, Kathryn Mover, 
and Floy Crouthamel, all former students 
at the college. Prof. Ober visited the 
schools taught by Misses Moyer and 
Croutbsmel and George Light, and found 
them doing good work. On their re- 
turn, they stopped at Lancaster at the 
Institute and heard the lecture by Dr. 
K. Amherst Ott on "Sour Grapes" 
( Heredity) . l'rof. < >ber speaks in glow- 
ing terms of this profound lectures. 



AGRICULTURAL 

DEPARTMENT 

The Agricultural Department of the 
College has embarked in practical Animal 
Husbandry in the way of raising two 
well-bred Hampshire pigs. Through the 
efforts of the head of the department, 
Simon Nissley, Prop, of the famous 
Nissley Lunch Rooms at Lancaster 
has been interested in this work and 
has entered into a contract to have this 
departmens of the College care for the 
pigs until next May, at which time one 
of these animals shall become the pro- 
perty of the institution with the hope 
that thorough-bred stock may be raised 
and kept here. The Agricultural De- 
partment will keep records and notes on 
the development of this phase of the 
worK. We hope that a poultry yard will 
soon be realized as another part of this 
department's work. 

The orchards are in good shape and 
look very promising. We hope that 
out of this small beginning of an Agricul- 
tural Department may grow a strong in- 
fluence for the love of the soil and that 
this may become a radiating center of 
interest in this the banner county of 
Agriculture. 



Mr. C. W. Cuthrie, who is now pursu- 
ing work at Bethany Bible School, 
Chicago, writes: — "I am very glad I 
spent one year at Elizabethtown College 
before coming here, for it fitted me all 
the belter for the work 1 am now getting. 
While a number have expressed them- 
selves as not being able to comprehend 
some of the teachings as it was too deep 
for them, yet I feel as though I am get- 
ting the Bible studies very well. The 
only thing that seems too deep for me 
is G-r-e-e-k, and I am working hard to 
store some ot that away." 



Subscribe for Our College Times. 



Religious Appointments 

Regular Preaching Services: — 

Oct. 23rd. 7 p. m. — Sermon 
by H. K. Ober. Subject: 

"Study." Text, 2 Tim. 2:1 5. 

Oct. 30th, 10.30 a. m. — Sermon 
by Harry Mohler. Subject: 

"Faith.,' Text, Heb. 11:1. 

Nov. 6th, 7.00 p. m. — Sermon by 
Dr. Reber. Subject: "Lessons 
from Life of Noah." Text, 
Gen. 6:1-21. 

Nov. 13th, 10.30 a. m. — Sermon 
by Elder Jno. Cline. Subject: 
"Temperance." Text, Prov. 

2 3:21. 
Mid-week Prayer Meeting: — 

Every Wednesday evening at G.30. 
Oct. 2G — Mamie Keller. 
Nov. 2 — Prof. H. K. Ober. 
Nov. 9 — Calvin Rose. 
Christian Workers' Meeting: — 

Oct. 23rd, G.30 — Gertrude Miller 

Nov. Gth, G.30 — Chas. D. Bower. 
Sunday Bible Classes: — 

Every Sunday at 8.15 a. m. 

Mark taught by Miss Lydia 
Stauffer. International Sunday 
School Lesson taught by Prof. 
J. G. Meyer. 



Are you interested in Local History? 
Then read the article on the history of 
Elizabethtown on another page of this 
issue. We hope to give you during the 
year other articles of this nature, — his- 
tory of the old Donegal Church, Cedar 
Hill Seminary once located at Mt. Joy, 
the burial place of George, Mdler, etc. 

Hirsh & Bro. 

Centre Square. Next lo Cily Hall 
LANCASTER, PA. 

Sole Agents for the Famous 
Micbaels-Stern I; e a d yt o 
Wear Suits and < Ivercoats, 
Men's Furnishings and Tail- 
oring. Plain Clothing a 
Specialty. Strictly one Price 
to All. 



"The House ol 
Good Clothes" 

Experience has taught us that our best 
interests will be the best interests of the 
man at the other end of the bargain. 




/ 



Tf 



We sell 
Mrn's. Young Men's ami Childr 
CLOTHING. HATS 
AND FURNISHINGS 



S. M. Myers & Co. 

12 East King Street 

LANCASTER, PENN'A 



The Book Store, 



G N. FALKENSTEIN 



Btbl:s, Books, g>tationer\>, |post Cavfcs 



Mail orders receive prompt attention. 



ELIZABJSTHTOWN 

ROLLER MILLS 

J. F. BINKELY, Propr. 

Manufacturer of Best Grades of 

FLOUR & FEED 

Use Bink'.ey's Celebrated Mash Food 

It Makes Hens Lay. 
EUZABETHTOWN, - 1'KXX A. 



JOHN C. BARBERIAN 

Modern Shoe Repairing 
Work guaranteed and Prices right. 

MANHEIM STREET. 



Ice Cream Confectionery, Sodas of all kinds 
Mrs. S. Hornafins' Confectionery 



POORMANS' BAKERY 

Choice Bread. Rolls and Cakes. 
HUMMELSTOWN STREET 



E. H. LEHMAN 



Co 



WOOD. GRAIN 
FLOUR, FEED 



A 



SEWER PIPE, 
ETC. 

Telephone 
EUZABETHTOWN, PENNA. 



L 



FURNITURE 



THE MOST COMPLETE ANT) UP- 
TO-DATE LINE IN THIS SECTION 
OP THE COtrNTRY. 

F. C. FISHER 



EIJZABETHTOWN, 



A. W. MARTIN 

COAL, Wool). GRAIN 
FLOUR and FEED 

Telephone 

EUZABETHTOWN, - PENNA. 



S. G. HERSHEY 

Groceries, Dry 

Goods and 

Notions. 

EIJZABETHTOWN, - PENNA. 



S. P. ENGLE 



S. Market & Bainbridge Sts. 



DRY GOODS, NOTIONS, rOOT- 

WEAR, CARPETS, LINOLEUMS 

AND OIL CLOTHS. 



EIJZABETHTOWN, PA. 



Jos.D.Hollinger/ ee X Win ni n 7 PHOB 

ROOFING & SPOUTING Light Brahmas 

Elizabethtown Pa. 



HOT AIR FURNACES 



Go To 
KERR'S BOOK STORE 

112-114 N. Queen St., Lancaster, Pa. 

— for — 

HOOKS AND STATIONERY 

PENNANTS PRINTING 



Bell, 9-5. Hours S to G 

DR JEROME G. HKSS 

DENTIST 

Hertzler Bldg. Elizabethtown Pa. 



AMERICAN FIELD AND POULTRY 
PENCE 

JOS. H. RIDER c& SON 



£. L. RENSEL 

General Blacksinithinp 
and Repair Work 
Horse-Shoeing a Specialty. 

Park St., Elizabethtown, Pa. 



J. RALPH GROSS 

THE BARBER 

Elizabethtown, - - Penna. 



JNO. M. SHOOKERS 
WATCHMAKER AND JEWELER 

5 yrs. with L. Weber & Son 

Lancaster, Pa, 

Eli/.nhcthtown, - - Penna. 



Bell & Ind. Phones 

The Lancaster Mail Order House 

Dealers in 

New and Old Rooks 
East Orange St., Lancaster, Pa 

For All Kinds of 

FARMING IMPLEMENTS 

Go To 

Geise & McBride 

ELIZABETHTOWN, - PENNA. 

BISHOP'S STUDIO 

Photos of All Styles. 

Framing Neatly Executed. 

Center Square, Elizabethtown, Ponna. 
ELIZABETHTOWN 

Dental fl>arlors 

S. J. HEIXDEL, Dentist. 



Ip-To-Datc Shoe Repairing 
We Guarantee You the Best Service 

and Materials 
S. K. Barnes ..V- Son, South Market St. 

FIVE AM) TKX CENT STORE 
It is really wonderful what a few 
pennies will buy In our ."> and II) 
cent store and every article is usefnl 
about the house. Nothing in the 
store is priced for more than 10c and 
from that down to lc. 
ELIZABETHTOWN, - PENNA. 



0. TV. HEISEY 
Provisions, Groceries C& Choice Candies 



ELIZABETHTOWN, PENH \ 



After Leaving College 



Ywll «l 



want to know what is doing on College Hill and in Elizabeth- 
town and vicinity. This you can easily get by subscribing for the . . . 

Eiizabcthtowns ELIZABETHTOWN HERALD 

Best Newspaper — 



GET MY PRICES ON 

Building Material 

PAINTS, ETC. 

before purchasing. Will be 
pleased to i| note on anything 
in the Hardware line. Edi- 
son Phonographs, Sporting 
Goods, Kodak supplies, etc. 

GEO. A. FISHER 

ELIZABETHTOWN, - PENNA. 

/. E. BELSER 

For Rooting, Spouting, Tin and 
(iranite Ware, Milk Cans, Radi- 
ators, Portable Furnaces, Granite 
Lisk Roasters in four sizes, or 
any special orders in my liue. 
Give me a trial. 

Opp. Exchange Batik 

ELIZABETHTOWN, - PENNA. 



SUBSCRIBE FOR 

OUR COLLEGE TIMES 
50c. PER YEAR 



0. C. RENSEL 

Choice Bread, Rolls 
& Cakes of All Kinds 

Prompt Delivery. 

S. Market St. 

ELIZABETHTOWN, - PENNA. 



KUHN'S 

CHOICE BREAD AND 
CAKES 

Weddings and parties supplied 
with Fancy Cakes at short 
notice. South Market Street. 

ELIZABETHTOWN, - PENNA. 



Harry Miller 

Furniture & Underktaing 

Furniture Repairing & I'pholstering 
Picture Framing 

Bell Phone 
Elizaln'thtown, - - Penna. 



a. WM. REISNER 

Manufacturing Jeweler, Class and 
Fraternity Pins, Pennants, Banners 



Lam-aster 



Penna. 



An early start, a steady pace, 
Is our way to win the race. 
We would advise those who can, 
Adopt a system, work the plan. 

Modern methods, nowadays, 
Are commendable in many ways 

AT NISSLEVS 
LUNCH AND DINING ROOMS 

14-16 E. Chestnut St., Lancaster, Pa. 



ELIZABETHTOWN COLLEGE FACULTY 



D. C. REBER, A. M. Pd. D., President 
Philosophy, Pedagogy, German. 

H. K. OBER, Pd. B., Vice President, 
Biological Science, Agriculture, 
Surveying. 

ELIZABETH MYER, M. E., 
Elocution and Grammer. 

B. F. WAMPLER. B. E., 

Director of Music. Voice Culture. 

FLORA GOOD WAMPLER, 
Piano, Organ, Harmony. 

J. G. MEYER, Pd. B., A. B., 

Mathematics, Physical Science. 
History. 

MARY E. MARKLEY. A. M., 

English, Latin and French. 

.1. Z. HERR Prin. Commercial Dep't, 
Bookkeeping, Penmanship, Com- 
mercial Law. 



JACOB S. HARLEY, A. B., 

Geography, History and Civics. 

LYDIA STAUFFER, 
English Bible. 

LEAH M. SHEAFFER, Pd. B., 

Piano, Organ, Drawing, Physi- 
cal Culture. 

R. W. SCHLOSSER, Pd. B., 

Latin and Algebra. 
ELIZABETH KLINE, 

Piano, English Branches. 
ANNA W. WOLGEMUTH, 

Shorthand and Typewriting. 
DAISY P. RIDER. Pd. B.. 

(Absent on Leave.) 
LAURA B. HESS. 

Sewing. 
ELD. S. H. HERTZLER, 

Exegesis (Bible Term). 



Contents 

A Christmas sketch - - - - - - - 11 

Alumni Notes ........ 15 

A Misunderstood Philanthropist ----- Hi 

Bible Term News -.......« 

Digest of Hev. Kurtz's Address ..... 12 

Editorial ........... g 

Educational Program ....... (j 

Jaouary ......... 3 

Literary - - - - - - - - 11 

Prostrate .lumper ........ n 

School News ........ 13 

Sermons by B. F. Heck man - - - - - - 7 

Society News ........ 5 

Sunday School Program ........ (j 

The Missionary Meeting ...... (j 

The New School Code - - - - - - - 17 

Why Senator Beveridge Carries a Bible .... 5 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



ELIZABETHOWN, PA., JANUARY, 1911. 



EDITORIAL STAFF 
1ZABETH MYER, Editor-in 



HOLMES KALKENSTEIN, i 
LEAH M. SHEAFFER, Alum 
B. F. WALTZ, Society News 



W. SCHLOSSER, l!i, 



n-Chief 

WALTER F. ESHLEMAN, Exchanges 

MAZIE MARTIN, Locals 

GERTRUDE MILLER, Stenographer 
Manager 



Our College Times is published i 


nonthly, 


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The paper will be sent conti 


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to old subscribers. 


io as not 


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: to discontinue has b 




eived at 








Report 


:hanges of address, and fail 


ire to re. 


seive this paper regularly, to the Busine* 


Terms : 


Fifty cents per vea 


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nts mom 


hly. 






Entered 


at the Post Office a 


t Elizabethtown 


. Pa.asSe 


cond-Class Matter, April 19, 



I arrearages charged, 



EDITORIAL 



'Old Time's great clock, that 



<rer 



Nor runs too fast nor slow, 
Hung up amid the worlds of space, 

Where wheeling planets glow. 
Its dial-plate the orbit vast 

Where whirls our mundane 
sphere, — 
Has pushed its pointer round again, 

And struck another year!" 

January. 

And now across the hills of Time, 
falls the story of a new Day, the 
royal birthday of a glad New Year. 
Make way for his coming — this mes- 
senger of promise! Open the gate- 
ways of the skies, let down the bars 
Of sunlight in the meadows of the 
heavens, hoist your flags of triumph, 
and hail King January, the ruling 
Sovereign of the year! Look up! 
see when' the horizon is brigbest, 
there is a motto for you and me, 
which reads, "Be thou faithful un- 
to death, and I will give thee a crown 
of Life!" 



Oh, glorious promise, arching 
above us like a rainbow of Hope, — 
a promise like the pillar of fire to 
go before us all the year! Let us 
indeed lie "faithful unto death." — 
IDA SCOTT TAYLOR. 



Bible Term is over. Our many 
friends have gone to their homes 
carrying with them, we hope, kindly 
remembrances of us as a school and 
helpful hints in their work as Sun- 
day School superintendents and teach- 
ers, ministers of the Gospel, mission- 
aries, and Christian workers in gen- 
eral. God bless them as they go 
and keep them always in His love. 
May they return to us whenever they 
have opportunity so to do. 

The precious truths in God's Word 
were unfolded and burned into us 
in a most earnest, effectual, and 
spiritual manner by Eld. J. Kurtz 
Miller, of Brooklyn, and Bro. B. F. 
Heckman, of Bethany Bible School, 
Chicago. May they have the pray- 
ers and substantial support of God's 
people in their work in the great 
clUfia which they represent. 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



To all students and workers about 
the college who have so kindly help- 
ed to entertain and make comfort- 
able our Bible Term students and 
visitors, the management expresses 
its appreciation and gratitude. 



At the Nineteenth Annual Conven- 
tion of the Lancaster County Sunday 
School Association which was held at 
Millersville in November, Hon. H. 
Frank Eshelman of Lancaster, deliv- 
ered a most profound address on 
"The Sunday School and Public Mor- 
ality." He made these startling re- 
marks: "The tendency of the times 
is to legislate the Bible out of our 
Public Schools; and in higher insti- 
tutions of learning, an attack is 
made upon the Trinity of the God- 
head, teaching that Jesus was sim- 
ply a moral man and not the Son 
of God." He further said that the 
chief object of education is culture. 
This word culture means the deve- 
lopment of the whole man, body, 
mind, and spirit. He made clear to 
the audience that the truest liberty 
and the highest state of civilization 
exists in countries where there is an 
open Bible, and that the inhabitants 
of such countries are purer and more 
true in moral character, that the 
standard of morals is higher in such 
countries than in countries where the 
Bible is not known. He said that 
moral backbone is more than scholar- 
ship. 

Is it not time for the citizens of 
America to wake up from their stu- 
por of indifference and to take a firm 
stand for an open Bible? We are 
glad to say that there are some who 
have taken a step in this direction. 
To promote Bible study they have 
effected an organization known as 
"The Open Bible League." Mem- 
bers of the movement must comply 



with the following rules: — 

(1) Keep your Bible alv.ays 
open. (2) Turn over a page every 
day. ( 3 ) Never allow the book 
to be covered up. 

The Gospel Messenger says, — 
"There are no dues or meetings in 
connection with the League The 
mles, it seems to us, are adaptable 
to all, and cannot fail to be of the 
greatest benefit to those who observe 
them, jnd that too, without especial- 
ly identifying themselves with the 
society referred to. Any man who 
has an open Bible, reads it daily, and 
allow!- nothing to int°.-f e r? with a 
thorough study of the s^ame, w'll se- 
cure a wonderful fund of Bible know- 
ledge, and attain to a corresponding 
growth of Divine life." 



School closed for the ho!id;>\ vaca- 
tion at 5 p. m. on Thursday, Decem- 
ber 22. The winter tern begins at 
1 ]). m. Monday January .. 



Don't forget the lecture to b" giv- 
en on January 12 by Dr. P. J. Stan- 
ley, of N'ewburg-on-Hudson. Dr. 
Stanley formerly occupied the chair 
of Fnglish History and Literature in 
Wateda University, Tokyo. Japan. 
The subject of his lectin' ].; "The 
Oriental Crisis of Today.'' 

Mr. Simon Xissley of the famous 
Nissley Lunch Rooms of Lancaster, 
Pa., heard Dr. Stanley lecture in Lan- 
caster, and it was through hint tha! 
we learned of this populai lecturer. 

Since this is our Bible Term num- 
ber, we take this opportunity of giv- 
ing to our readers great men' 
Ions "f the Bible. 

Emperor Wilhelm of Germany 
says: — 

"It is a pleasure to read It every 
night. A Bible lies on a tnble at 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



my bedside. I cannot understand 
how so many people exist who do not 
attend God's word. It is the source 
from which I draw strength and 
light. I seek consolation therein in 
the hour of sorrow and depression. 
and find comfort. I am convinced 
that many who have neglected relig- 
ion and have fallen from God will 
regain their faith and feel the need 
of communion with the Almighty. 
Periods of dangerous doubt have al- 
ways been followed by periods of en- 
thusiastic religious feeling. All of 
us must go through Gethsemane, for 
hours and hours, in which our pride 
is humbled. It is difficult to be 
humble, for each of us wants to be 
his own master." 

Why Senator Beveridge Carries a 
Bible. 

I carry the Hiblo with me as a mat- 
ter of literary relaxation. The tell- 
ers of the Bible stories tell the 
stories and stop. "He builded him 
a city" — He smote the Philistines" — 
"He took her to his mother's tent" — 
you are not wearied to death by the 
details. Go into any audience ad- 
dressed by a public speaker, and you 
will perceive that his hearers' inter- 
est depends on whether he is getting 
to the point. "Well, why doesn't 
he get to the point?" is the common 
expression in public assemblages. 
The Bible "gets to the point." And 
it has something for everybody. If 
you are a politician or even a states- 
man, no matter how shrewd you are. 
you can read with profit several 
times a year the career of David, the 
cleverest politician and one of the 
greatest statesmen that ever lived. 
If you are a business man, the Pro- 
verbs of Solomon will tone you up 
like mountain air. If you are a 
woman, read Ruth. A man of prac- 
tical- -life, a great man, but purely, a 



man of the world, once said to me, 
"If I could enact one statute for all 
the young women of America, it 
would be that each of them should 
read the book of Ruth once a month." 
— Saturday Evening Post. 



Society Xotes. 

The programs of the past month 
in Literary Society have been of a 
very high order. The music con- 
sisting of solos, quartetts, octetts, 
etc., has been especially good of late. 
Papers were read on "The History 
of Elizabethtown College from its 
Founding," and "The Future of 
Elizabethtown College." 

Some questions debated were, — ■ 
"Resolved, That first class mail rates 
should be reduced to one cent per 
ounce," and "Resolved, That modern 
improvements are a detriment to the 

In an election lately held the fol- 
lowing officers were elected: Presi- 
dent, Mr. Carper, C12); Vice Presi- 
dent, E. W. Wenger, ('12); Secre- 
tary. Edna Leiter, ('11); Critic, L. 
W. Leiter, ('11); Editor, Mr. 01- 
weiler, ('ID; Chorister, Leah M, 
Sheaffer, CIO). 



Latest News 

Mr. Isaac Hackman is teaching 
Penmanship and Book-keeping in the 
Philadelphia Business College on 
Chestnut Street, Philadelphia. 

Oscar Diehm, a graduate in our 
Commercial Department, is at pres- 
ent employed in John Wanamaker's 
Store, Philadelphia. 

Daisy P. Rider ('10) and Viola 
Withers ('09) students in Art and 
Music in Philadelphia, have return- 
ed to their homes in Elizabethtown 
to spend the Christmas Holidays. 
They attended Chapel exercises at 
the College on Wednesday before 
Christmas. 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 

BIBLE TERM NEWS 



Educational Program 

The Educational Program render- 
ed on Saturday afternoon, December 
10, in the College chapel was presid- 
ed over by Dr. D. C. Reber, presi- 
dent of the College. The opening 
prayer was offered by Eld. J. Kutrz 
Miller, of Brooklyn. A Ladies' Oc- 
tette rendered two exceedingly touch- 
ing selections of music, entitled "Just 
Beyond" and "Softly and Tenderly 
Jesus is Calling." "The Importance 
of Biology in Education" was the 
subject of a most profound discourse 
delivered by Dr. R. C. Scheidt, Pro- 
fessor of Science in F. & M. College, 
Lancaster. This was followed by 
another most excellent address on 
"The Religious Aspect of Education" 
by Dr. D. W. Kurtz, Pastor of the 
First Church of the Brethren, Dau- 
phin and Carlisle Streets, near Broad, 
Philadelphia. Seldom, if ever, have 
more scholarly and elevating dis- 
courses been heard. A Round Table 
was conducted by B. F. Heckman of 
Chicago. 

The Missionary Meeting. 

The Missionary Program executed 
on Saturday afternoon, December 
17, was helpful and very inspiring 
to the listeners. Eld. S. H. Hertz- 
ler was moderator of the meeting. 
Eld. S. Z. Witmer, of Spring Creek 
Church, lead in the opening prayer. 
Miss Leah M. Sheaffer of the College 
Faculty, read an Inspiring paper on 
"How can we aid in Supplying the 
Demand for Workers." Martha 

Martin, '09, discussed well the topic, 
"China an Open Field for the Breth- 
ren." "Our Duty Towards the Un- 
occupied Territory of Eastern Penn- 
sylvania" was then discussed by Eld. 



Jesse Ziegler, of Royersford. The 
Round Table was dispensed with, 
and Bro. B. F. Heckman substituted 
instead with a talk on "The Work 
of the Brethren in Chicago." We 
were impressed very forcibly with 
the need of greater Missionary zeal. 
A substantial evidence of this was 
manifested in a collection which 
amounted to more than twenty-two 
dollars. 

Sunday School Program 

On Sunday afternoon, Dec. 11. a 
very interesting Sunday School meet- 
ing was held in the College Chapel. 

A. G. Longenecker served as mod- 
erator and H. B. Mohler conducted . 
the devotional exercises. Elder J. 
Kurtz Miller of Brooklyn, then dis- 
cussed the topic, "How to Interest 
and Keep the Young People in Sun- 
day School between the Ages of 1 1 
and 20." Among the points, he 
made were the following: — "A 
Ground Hog Sunday School," won't 
hold boys. (1) All Sunday Schools 
should be continued during the en- 
tire year; (2) The teacher should 
be one who is young or young at 
heart : ( ". i Go after the boys when 
absent, and if the teacher does not 
do this the Superintendent should 
see that it is done; (4i The home 
environment and training is a great 
factor. In a large number o< 

oe is responsible for the at- 
tendance "i bi 

Instead of the other topics on the 

program, Bro. Heckman was request- 
ed In discuss "The New Graded Sun- 
day School Lesson System " He shew- 
ed how different parts of the Bible 
are especially suited to the different 
ages of children, and by means of 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 






books containing the Bible lessons 
properly graded, our Sunday School 
pupils would learn more Bible. Bro. 
Wiiaiid has arranged such a course. 
It Is DOt merely a theory but is be- 
ing used and meets with success in 
their Sunday Schools in Chicago. 

The last feature of the program 
was a "Round Table:" during which 
a number of short speeches were 
made on the following questions: — 

(1) Should visitors be invited to 
teach in Sunday School? The gen- 
eral sentiment was that they should 
not. 

(2) By whom should Sunday 
School Teachers be appointed? Bro 
Sam'l Hertzler said, "There should 
be a nominating committee including 
Church officials and Sunday School 
Teachers, then the Superintendent 
might appoint one from a number 
nominated by the Committee." 
Others favored a similar procedure. 

(3) Should we have some one talk 
to the Sunday School every Sunday? 
Sister Wampler, said, "It's an injus- 
tice to theteachers and to the pupils." 
Bro. Hertzler made some remarks 
concerning the value of good stories 
told by a superintendent. 

(4) What are Superintendents' du- 
ties between Sundays? 

(5) Who should look after the 
absent? 

MAZIE MARTIN. 



Sermons by B. F. Heckman 

The vacancy caused in our Bible 
Term program through the illness 
of Eld. G. M. Lauver was very ably 
filled by B. F. Heckman, also a 
teacher in Bethany Bible School, 
Chicago. Condensed reports of the 
sermons given by Bro. Heckman are 
given below: — 

Dec. 11 — Text, Eph. 6:10. Sub- 
ject — "The Work of the Holy Spirit." 



How shall we be able to continue 
in the Christian life? We will have 
to stand against the evil one from 
whom we have turned. We can- 
not depend on self — on our own 
human power. The empty, swept 
and garnished house must have an 
occupant. That occupant must be 
stronger than self, and even stronger 
than Satan whose servants we had 
been. We dare not go to sleep af- 
ter our baptism lest the old occupant 
return with Seven Spirits worse than 
the first. How then shall we be 
able to stand? The Spirit of God 
— the Holy Spirit must come into 
our lives. 

From the Old Testament we have 
men of various types who were con- 
trolled by His Spirit, e.a. (1) Gideon 
was indeed with special generalship 
to deliver his people. (2) Isaiah, the 
preacher of .Tudah, after having a 
vision of Sin, God and Self was com- 
manded to go to the debauched sin 
stained people. (3) Bazabel and 

Oholiah were given special skill as 
they wrought the golden vessels and 
fixtures for the temple. (4) Samp- 
son though vile and of low character 
in general, was given physical 
strength to deliver his people. (5) 
Moses was given leadership and led 
Israel to Canaan. (6) Joshua by 
his guidance conquered the land of 
Canaan. (7) Balaam — that heath- 
en prophet, in some way was used 
of God and he pronounced a most 
extraordinary phophecy. (S) Saul's 
prophets — a band of them who came 
to take David — as they saw Samuel's 
men prophesy, they prophesied. 
(9) To Zacheriah was given the vivi- 
on of the Lamp and the bowl con- 
stantly replenished from the tree. 
God said, "Knowest thou what 
these mean?" and he said, "Xo 
Lord," then he answered, "This is 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



the word unto Zerubbabel — 'Not by 
might nor by power, but by my spir- 
it.' " And from that time the re- 
building of the temple was again be- 
gun. (10) Joseph was given wis- 
dom to interpret Pharoh's dream. 
(11) 1 Peter 2:21— "All prophecy 
was inspired by God." 

In the New Testament John from 
his birth was filled by the Spirit. 
Simeon recognized the Messiah by 
this power. Jesus was conceived 
of the HOly Spirit. In his child- 
hood he grew in Spirit as well as 
physique. In his baptism the Holy 
Spirit abode upon him in the form 
of a dove. All through his life he 
was the guide and controller. 

Did the Spirit so marvelously man- 
ifest itself in the O. T. and in the 
Life of Christ and then stop? Nay, 
verily, look at Peter; contrast him 
on the day of Pentecost and at 
the time of the trial of Christ. Are 
we willing to allow this power — this 
spirit to come into our lives as 
Peter did? Do we lay upon the al- 
ter the sacrifice of Rom. 12:1-3. 

How are we to experience the Holy 
Spirit? Not by physically or intellec- 
tually, but by Spirit touching Spirit. 
Through this touch are we enabled 
to call "Abba Father." Even the 
groanings through the spirit arc 
known of God. Who shall separate 
us from the Love of God? 



Dec. 12 — Subject — The Worthy 
Life. Text, Phil. 1:27. 

The church at Philippi was begun 
on Paul's second Missionary journey. 
Lydia and her household, and the 
jailer were the first converts. Th« 
Epistle to the Philippians was writ- 
ten while Paul was in prison in 
Rome. 

The words of Paul in the Text ex- 
hort to a life worthy of the Gospel of 



Christ — that it is as Paul says in 2 
Cor. 2:14, "Maketh manifest through 
us the Savor"— herein we have a pic- 
ture of triumph in the Orient. A gen^ 
eral returning from this victory, lead- 
ing his captives to the nostrils of the 
victors, the Savor or odor from the 
incense burned on that occasion, is 
pleasant, and very agreeable; to the 
captives the same Savor is very of- 
fensive, Savoring of death unto 
death. Paul pleads that the Savor 
— the report of this Phillipian 
Church, that shall greet his ears may 
be that of unity. Christ in his final 
commission, gave his command for 
his disciples to convert all the world, 
as they went. — How were they to do 
it? Their life was the large factor 
in this work, not a mere profession. 
We realize that the profession must 
be ratified by the life, or else we 
would send our missionaries to a cer- 
tain locality by installments allowing 
them to return to other quarters out- 
side of those in which they are work- 
ing. We must get it and live it in 
the eyes of those with whom we are 
dealing. We can not do this in our 
own strength. We are weak. The 
Holy Spirit must be in us. To the 
Philippians living it meant suffering. 
In Phil. 3:4 Paul says if any of you 
are inclined to have confidence in the 
flesh, I'll allow them to look at me. 
If any one has reasons for boasting, 
look at I my standing Phil 3:4-8. 
Look at the catalogue Jewish people, 
yet in comparison with Christ "I 
count them but loss, that I might 
have Christ." 

Why are there not more Pauls 
who count all that they are and have 
us "refuse" — garbage that they may 
allow God to como into their lives. 
V, e muBl surrender all. A full sur- 
render in more of our professors 
would help in supplying the demand 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



for missionaries. Those of us who 
could not go would be eager to give 
of their means that they might ex- 
change their finance which is only 
earthly for souls. 

Dec. 13 — Subject — Laying Up 
Treasures. Text Eccl. 2:1-24. 

Solomon in this chapter, tells of 
his own vanity and riches. As we 
think of the life of Solomon we 
can realize that he was writing out 
of his own experiences. In his later 
life he had some most bitter experi- 
ences. Here he re-counts his honor 
and his wealth, yet throughout the 
chapter and book he laments — "van- 
ity of vanities all is vanity." Van- 
ity — empty! Soon he will have to 
die and then will his successor be a 
wise man or a fool, who can tell? 
God made man upright: but he has 
sought out many inventions. 

Solomon had sought pleasure and 
riches in this world. He fully real- 
ized this folly. In Christ's sermon 
on the Mount in the context of Matt. 
6:33 — "Seek ye first the Kingdom 
of Heaven" we have the riches on 
the earth and those in Heaven con- 
trasted. In Matt. G:19 He speaks 
of Laying Up Treasures — What is a 
Treasure? Anything that is prec- 
ious to us, be it of much or little val- 
ue. — Whatever our treasure is. if it 
is our education, a child, a farm or 
whatever, we need to let God have 
it all. In our farming we should 
at least be His tenant and give him 
the rent. 

Doing God's will be it where he 
wills — in China, in a college, in the 
home is the business of the Christian. 
Our treasures here on earth will 
become moth eaten — corrupted. We 
need to transfer them from earth 
to Heaven, for where our treasures 
are there our hearts will be also. 



We are not to be anxious — worry 
about our lives. God will take care 
of that side of affairs. It is ours 
to allow him to have his will done 
in us, e. g. our clothes. Jesus said 
look at the wild flowers of the field — 
The Father clothes them. In all 
things look to God. We are to have 
no will of our own but live in full 
subjection to God's will. 



Dec. 14 — Subject — A Call to Ser- 
vice. — Isaiah 6. 

To understand Isaiah's call in 
Chapter G we need to remember that 
Israel at this time was going into 
sin. In Is. 1:3 we have the picture 
of the beast, — the dumb animal re- 
cognizing his master more than God's 
people were recognizing him. Isa- 
iah declares their gross sinfulness, 
yet in 1:18 he says though their sins 
be as scarlet, they shall be as wool. 
— Hope for them if they will return." 

Coming to Chapter 5, we have the 
parable of the vineyard. The pic- 
ture of a vineyard with every effort 
and care possible that a harvest of 
luscious grapes may be the result of 
the labor, but there is a disappoint- 
ment in finding wild grapes. Thru 
out the chapter we have the woes 
pronounced upon their sins that they 
were indulging in — the wild-grapes 
they were yielding instead of the 
fruit they should have been yielding. 
Because of this evil God will allow 
the nations to come upon them with 
their destructive forces. In connec- 
tion with this vision, God sends the 
call to Isaiah. He sees God as he is, 
then he realizes his own vileness, 
and God cleanses him, and he is 
willing to say, "Here Lord am J, 
send me," as the inquiry comes, 
"Who shall go to this people?" If 
we get a vision of Sin, God and Self, 
will we not be ready to say the same? 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



Again Ezekiel was called of God, 
and continued not to become rebel- 
lious like the people. He was given 
the vision of a book — a roll, and 
was commanded to eat the roll. 
After doing so he was given the com- 
mand to go to his people and speak 
his word. Are we eating God's roll 
— his word? God will prepare us 
if we are willing to be prepared. He 
will use you if you are cleansed and 
are willing to be used. 



through the ceremony, yet he de- 
clares that he is not clean. Judas' 
heart was fundamentally wrong. 

The communion instituted by 
Jesus must be realized, and we must 
get the inner significance before we 
can enter fully into the service and 
realize its benefits. It requires the 
concrete to represent the abstract 
principles. These New Testament 
Ordinances only symbolize the inner 
Christian life of the participant. 



Dec. 1G — Subj. — Obedience more 
than Sacrifice. 1 Sam. 15:3. 

Saul was given a Commission. In 
v. 7 Saul is obedient. He reports 
that he has discharged his duty, but 
when Samuel comes and questions 
him in every detail, he finds disobe- 
dience in sparing the king and the 
best of the flock. 

"Under the Law Sacrifice meant a 
great deal. It had been instituted 
by God. It was symbolical — typi- 
cal of Christ's blood shed for sins 
of His people. But in this in- 
stance obedience would have been 
better than sacrifice. The ceremon- 
ial had a place only when the heart 
is in the right attitude. Go back 
to Amos 5:21. Jehovah declares 
that he hates the feasts. Why? 
Their lives do not measure up to 
God's Standard. The true Sacrifice 
is acceptable when it comes from the 
heart. Isaac was a true offering of 
Abraham, because he had virtually 
offered him. So throughout the 
Old Testament we have these refer- 
ences to acceptable ceremonies. 

In the New Testament we have 
symbolical ceremonies thai are only 
pleasing when the life accords with 
the ceremonial. e. g. Peel washing. 
When Jesus had the conversation 
with the Disciples, he said, "Ye are 
not all clean." A Judas had gone 



December 17 — 

Jud. 1:17 — Subj. — Service in His 
Love. 

"Keepyourself in the love of God." 
We got into the "love of God," by 
Him seeking us while we were in sin, 
— Lost as the Prodigal Son. When 
we come back to God — drawn by His 
love, we become His property. We 
should move at his will. If we sub- 
mit ourselves into his hands he will 
use us. Some times, people refuse 
to come to Christ, saying that they 
can not hold out. It is not our 
business to hold out— that is God's 
business. 

.lude here sounds a note of warn- 
ing, because any one who is out of 
the Love of God goes down. He 
gives illustrations of those who have 
done so in v. 5, G, 7. 

In v. 5, we have the example of 
Israel — God's people, because of 
their disobedience and falling out of 
the Love of God suffering distruction. 
and of angels who because of dis- 
obedience were put in bonds. 

If we keep in the Love of God we 
will be planted on a rock Instead Ol 
Clay. By faith we overcome if we 
are in the Love of God. Our faith 
gives assurance. 

\tt'i we are in the Love of God 
we ran reach out and snatch others 
v. 24, and that is our business. 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



LITERARY 

A Christmas Sketch 

(An exercise in Rhetoric.) 
While the soft ?now was falling 
in the stillness oJ the dawn on the 
day before Christmas, seven Western 
girls were sitting and looking with 
longing eyes from the dormintory 
windows of an Eastern College, 
were watching some light-hearted 
students as they danced around on 
the pavement trying to keep warm 
while they waited for the car which 
was to start them on their journeys 
homeward. These few were oblig- 
ed to remain as they were not fortu- 
nate enough to have friends or re- 
latives in East with whom they 
might visit and it was impossible 
for them to spend Christmas at 
home because of the great distance. 
Nine o'clock found them still at 
the window thinking deeply, greatly 
downcast, — something that is very 
unusual for a lively set of college 
girls. Suddenly their faces beamed 
with delight when they noticed the 
expressman jump from his wagon 
with his arms so full of packages 
that he was unable to balance him- 



self on the icy pavement, 
went, parcels and all. 

The girls sprang up, rai 
the first floor and greeted 
a chorus of, "Any packagf 



Down he 

down to 

him with 
s for me, 



"Packages, well I should say, I 
wonder if those people didn't send 
all they own!" he answered in a 
sarcastic manner, not yet fully re- 
signed to his duties and the icy pave- 
ments. 

Eager to know what the holly-de- 
corated parcels contained, every girl 
grabbed several without looking at 
the address and began to tear them 
open. Fearful confusion followed. 
On one spot were thrown all the 



handkerchiefs; on another the 
gloves. Betty was opening a pack- 
age that contained a new tea set 
while the rest were going wild about 
some new evening dresses. What 
delighted them most were the boxes 
of Christmas goodies. Now they 
could have a royal spread on Christ- 
mas Eve. 

But how were they going to do it? 
Many times they asked such permis- 
sion but the dean would not grant 
it. Several hours passed before 
they could strike a plan. Finally 
one of the girls said that since the 
teachers of Betty's hall had gone 
home, they could meet in Betty's 
room without letting the teachers 
know anything of it. Satisfied 
that they were safe in doing this, 
every one went to her room for the 
first time that day. 

Half past eight brought the girls 
to Betty's room where the table 
cloth was already spread for any- 
thing that the girls might bring. So 
much was brought that many more 
could have enjoyed it with them. 
Things looked so inviting that they 
began to eat at once, but when Mary 
suggested that they pan oysters they 
all stopped. In the midst of the 
process, Polly, forgetting that every 
thing was to go off as quietly as 
possible, struck up a song on the 
guitar in which all joined. This 
brought a rap on the door. 

There was perfect silence. "What 
can we do?" they thought. Polly 
turned out the light, Betty jumped 
into the wardrobe, Beatrice and Nan- 
cy crept under the bed. The rest 
sat by the table. The door open- 
ed. There stood the dean with all 
the teachers, who like themselves 
were left at College. Each wore a 
look of disgust. The girls' time 
had come. The dean stepped for- 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



ward and with a firm voice said, "I 
am sorry that you cannot continue 
your fun," the girls' head dropped 
in shame, "unless you allow us to 
join you." 

"Perfectly delightful!" shouted 
the girls and they greeted the teach- 
ers in a surprisingly informal man- 
ner. The remainder of the evening 
was spent most joyously in eating, 
chattering, playing the guitar and 
singing. Never before did the 

teachers so entirely join forces with 
the students. So throughly did the 
teachers unbend that room, teachers, 
and students made a puzzle — "Find 
the Faculty." 

REBEKAH SHEAFFER. 

Digest of Rev. Kurtz's Address 
The religious part of education is 
the largest and most important part 
to say the least. Religion was 
originally the whole thing. Every 
act was a religious act. Our civili- 
zation of today was evolved from re- 
ligion. Medicine is a child of re- 
ligion. So is Law, Astromony, Mus- 
ic, Art, Poetry and even Philosophy, 
the most stubborn of them all. Re- 
ligion is still the greatest and most 
important, and deserves first consid- 
eration. We cannot understand 
History without understanding reli- 
gion, for religion has been the main 
factor in the rise and fall of nations. 
Religion has been, and is, common 
to all humanity. Every race and 
tribe, civilized or uncivilized has 
some religion, be it good or bad. 

Phychologically speaking, religion 
is a part of the human mind. Man 
is a religious animal. That is the 
way we are made. We can't be a 
full being without it. It is the nor- 
mal condition of life. Hence to 
neglect our religious education 
makes us dwarfs and our develop- 
ment one-sided. Is there any one 



here who would risk sending his 
children to Godless Institutions? 

Religion is the unifying element 
in education. Science teaches us 
the pluralism of the universe, while 
Religion teaches us to see in it the 
unity of God. Without religion life 
would have no aim and little value. 
Morality and Ethics could not take 
the place of the Gospel. Philoso- 
phy attempts to answer the three 
great questions: "Where did I come 
from?" "Where am I going?" 

"What shall I do under the circum- 
stances?" Only religion can suc- 
cessfully answer these. By chang- 
ing the springs of human action, re- 
ligion makes morality possible. 

Liberty, equality, and fraternity 
exist only in the Christian religion. 
The gospel of Christ makes us free 
from the bondage of custom, for- 
malism, law, sin and fear. Since 
every one has an equal right before 
the father, we have equality. Fra- 
ternity is recognized in the Brother- 
hood of Man and the Fatherhood of 
God. 

The Bible, the source of the 
Christian religion, is the ileal text 
book. It is the greatest of all liter- 
ature. It dissects human life, and 
fathoms all human emotions. It 
reveals God and man, and shows us 
the way of salvation. Shake- 

speare alludes to the Bible 2000 
times. .Milton. Dante. Tennyson. 

Browning, and Wordsworth were in- 
fluenced by it. 

It is impossible to understand His- 
tory without a knowledge of the 
Bible. The Bible, considered sim- 
ply as literature, is the greatest of 
all literature. Job represents the 
highest kind of drama, the Psalms. 
of Music and Poetry, and the Pro- 
phets, of Philosophy. The Gospels 
vividly portray the life of ( '.irist and 
bis Ethical teaching. We can read 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



the gospel of Mark in 50 minutes. 

Notwithstanding these things we 
sadly neglect the Bible Sensation- 
al novels are read with great inter- 
est. The newspapers dish up for 
us daily the crimes, and scandals. 
and selfishness of humanity, and we 
scan them eagerly. The forces of 
secularism are attempting to control 
our government and schools. It is 
said that in Illinois the Bible is 
excluded from practically every pub- 
lic institution except the state peni- 
tentiary. Hence if a person in Illi- 
nois wants his child taught the Bible 
in a state institution he would have 
to send him to the penitentiary. All 
our great national evils and vices 
are due to lack of religious education 
in general and neglect of the Eible 
in particular. 

In conclusion let us accept the 
testimony of religion in History. 
Christianity needs no argument. It 
is a matter of personal experience 
We do not hesitate to accept a man's 
testimony in court; and we should 
accept the testimony of the Christian 
that his religion brings perfection, 
peace, and joy. The scientist walks 
by faith and not by sight alone. He 
cannot see the atom that forms the 
basis of the physical universe nor 
can he see the infinite number of 
living things inhabiting thousands of 
miniature worlds all about us. Thus 
religion resembles science. On the 
other hand science values us by what 
we came from; religion values us by 
what we are to be. The funda- 
mental notes of religion are good- 
ness and love. It is the way of life, 
the power that enables us to become 
the sons of God. 



To be worthy, not simply respectable. 

And wealthy, not simply rich; 

To study hard, think quietly, 

Talk gently, act frankly; 

To listen with open heart to birds 
and stars, 

To babes and sages; 

To bear all cheerfully, do all brave- 
ly; 

Await occasions, never hurry, — 

In a word, to let the spiritual life 

Grow up through and above the com- 
mon, — 

This is to be my "symphony of life." 
WILLIAM ELLERY CHA NNING 



My Symphony. 

To live content with small means; 
To seek elegance rather than luxury, 
Refinement rather than fashion, 



SCHOOL NEWS 

Locals. 

The Bible Term which had been 
anticipated so long closed December 
17. The students are industrious- 
ly making up time taken for the rare 
treats in Bible Lessons. 

Quite a number of students have 
again enrolled but they have already 
become so well acclimated to their 
environments that a stranger would 
not be able to tell the new from the 
old. 

Dec. 13, we were agreeably sur- 
prised by a visit from Bro. M. C. 
Sweigart, pastor of the Germantown 
Church, of Philadelphia. He served 
on the committee which met here to 
consider dividing Eas>t. District of 
Pa. 

On the last Friday morning of our 
Bible Term a number of persons were 
called upon during Chapel exercises, 
to address the school. The follow- 
ing expressed their appreciation of 
the advantages the school affords 
and of the help they received while 
attending Bible Term; — Jesse Zieg- 
ler, Levi Mohler, John Cline, W. C. 
Holsinger, Mrs. Hannah Ziegler, Ber- 
tha Horner, Wm. G. Nyce, M. H. 



«4 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



Brumbaugh, S. Z. Witmer, Hiestand 
Madeira, H. B. Mohler. Ira M. Horb, 
Harry Keller and S. H. Hertzler. 

Room C, commonly known as 
Miss Myer's class room, has lately 
been dressed in a new coat of paper. 
From the molding are hung large 
framed portraits 01 Longfellow, 
Bryant and Wm. Penn. 

Prof. Ober, recently returned from 
Elgin where he served on an annual 
meeting committee, on Sunday School 
work. 

Dr. Reber recently visited May- 
town High School. 

Nov. 27, L. B. Earhart a graduate 
of our school, visited his Alma Mater. 

He is now teaching in Smyrna, 
Delaware and enjoys his work. 

Nov. 29, Prof. Harley attended 
the funeral of his aunt at Hatfield. 

Nov. 27, a number of our students 
attended Lancaster Lovefeast. 

Nov. 25, 20 and 27, Miss Fogel- 
sanger, a former member of the Fac- 
ulty, visited some of her many 
friends at and around College Hill. 

Bro. B. F. Heckman of Bethany 
Bible School, Chicago, conducted the 
regular Wednesday evening prayer 
meeting at the College, Dec. 7. 

Misses Dora and Lydia Wanner, 
teachers in the Reading public 
schools, were in our midst Dec. 17 
and lf>. 

Nov. 1S-19-20 Miss Mary Hershey 
was visited by three of her friends 
from LItitz. 

Miss Anna Warfel of Millersville 
visited her friend and former room- 
mate Miss Sarah Wenger, also on 
the above date. 

We were pleased to note the fol- 
lowing representatives at Bibli 
from a number of the counties of Pa. 
besides those from various parts of 



our own county. Among the num- 
ber were: 

Berks Co., — Mrs. Annie Toreman. 

Blair Co.,— Eld. end Mrs. W. H. 
Holsinger, M. H. Brumbaugh, Mrs. 
Daniel Shelley. 

Cumberland Co., — Ira M. Hart and 
wife. 

Dauphin Co.. — Anna Bashore, Mrs. 
S. R. Geyer, Bertha Homer, George 
YV. Henry. 

Lebanon Co., — Bertha HMlinger, 
Kathryn Longenecker, Nora Sny- 
der, Mary Weaver, Wm. R. Dubble. 
Phares S. Nolt and wife, Amy and 
Elizabeth Brubaker. 

York Co.,-Queenie Riehling, Kath- 
ryn Stone, Martha Beelman and Liz- 
zie Lerew. 

Adams Co., — Florence Utz. 

Montgomery Co., — Elenora Moyer, 
Ella Adams, Eld. Jessie Zie^ler and 
wife. .Mamie A. Price, Sarah M. Booze 
Levi Ziegler and wife. Wm. C. Nyce. 

Exchanges. 

We are glad to say that our ex- 
change list is growing. All school 
papers whose literary productions 
are helpful to the student body, are 
given a welcome reception by "Our 
College Times". We cheerfully ack- 
nowledge the following: "Lcrdsburg 
College Educator", "Purple and 
White", "Juniata Echo". "Purple 
and Gold". "Red and Black", and 
"Albright Bulletin" for November: 
"Linden Hall Echo". "Prl indship 
Banner". "Albright Bulletin". "Heb- 
ron Star". "Ursinus Weekly", and 
"College Campus" for December. 

The essay entitled "The I ennayl- 
vania Germans" in "Pun I ■ and 
White" proves in a convint in : man- 
ner that the Keystone state owes a 
great deal to the thrift, economy, 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



integrity and perseverance of those 
historic people. 

The article, "Stephen Pomeroy's 
Ride" in the "Albright Bulletin", 
should bo read by every true Amer- 
ican. !:i it the writer relates the 
thrilling ride of Pomeroy and why 
the Unit :i army was victorious at 
Gettysburg. These are some of the 
important tacts of history that are 
not written in the pages of text- 
books. 

We welcome the "Red and Black" 
of Reading. The paper is filled 
with arti les on various subjects of 
interest to everybody. 

The Christmas numbers of the Al- 
bright Bulletin" and "College Cam- 
pus" abound in interesting Christ- 
mas stories. 

One question that every College 
student should ask himself is. "Am 
I imbued with the real COLLEGE 
SPIRIT? You may think you are 
filled with it. Read "The College 
Spirit" in "Purple and Gold" arid 
profit thereby. The author defines 
it as "nothing more or less than col- 
lege patriotism, and to feel it we 
must have it thoroughly ground into 
our bones." He divides college stu- 
dents into three classes: those who 
settle down to books an 1 forget ev- 
erything else, receiving only a one- 
sided education; those who go for 
the fun they expect to have by fol- 
lowing their motto. "Eat, drink and 
be merry, and let lessons go"; and 
the ideal class, or those, who want td 
get all the good the college affords, 
thus being morally, mentally and 
physically up to the standard. 

"Have you missed in your aim? 
Well, the mark is still Bhining; 

Did you faint in the race? Well, 
take breath for the next; 

Did the clouds drive yon back? 



who was suffering 
accident, is able to 



But see yonder their lining; 
Were you tempted and fell? Let 
it serve for a text." 

— Purple and Gold. 

Alumni Notes. 

Mr. L. B. Earhart, CIO) visited 
the College a few weeks ago. He 
reports that work is going fine. He 
is teaching at Smyrna, Delaware, in- 
stead of New Jersey as reported in 
the last issue. 

We are glad to note that Ella 
Young, ('Of 
from a seve 
teach again. 

It is with pleasure that we an- 
nounce the return of Joshua D. Reb- 
er, ('09) from West Virginia. He 
is now taking up work ct the Col- 
lege. 

On Nov. 20, a bright eyed baby boy 
J. Emmert, came to grace the home 
of Prof, and Mrs. J. Z. Herr. The 
father seems very proud of his son 
and is very glad to have baby's name 
attached to the cradle roll of the 
College. 

Miss Estella U. Frantz. ('09) at- 
tended the Bible Term, Dec. 10 and 
11. She is teaching near Ronks. 
Lane. Co.. in an Ornish district and 
Reports that she has thirty some pu- 
pils and all are of the Ornish faith. 
She has taught the same school for 
three years and has met with suc- 
cess. 

All the friends of Miss Klizabeth 
Zortman were glad to welcome her 
here on Dec. 10 and 11. The twen- 
ty-fifth Annual Report published by 
the Y'oung Women's Union of 422 
to -12 8 Bainbridge St., Philadelphia, 
states the following: "It is also due 
to our conscientious nurse, Miss 
Zortman, whom we heartily coni- 
mena for her untiring watchfulness, 



i6 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



that our wards are indebted for much 
of their escape from disease." 

Among other members of the 
Alumni Association who attended 
various sessions of the Bible Term, 
were P. B. Eshelman, ('07), Mrs. J. 
A. Buffenmyer, C07), Mrs. Mary 
Stayer Groff, C04), Mrs. Mary Hess 
Reber, C05), Martha Martin, ('10). 

Miss Blanche Rowe, CIO) graces 
the editor's chair in the Exchange 
Department of our contemporary, 
the "Philomathean Monthly," pub- 
lished at Bridgewater College, Va. 



Vacation at the College. 

The Fall Term ended Thursday 
noon, Dec. 1. In the afternoon 
many of our students were seen 
wending their way in various direc- 
tions, some going to their homes, 
others accompanying some of their 
school-mates home, and still others 
— because of the Christmas vacation 
being so near — remaining at the Col- 
lege. 

As we watched the departing fig- 
ures disappear in the distance and 
the shades of darkness began to 
lower over College Hill, you may 
think that a tinge of gloom and 
loneliness settled over the once 
bright and cheerful, but now almost 
forsaken halls and that despair and 
home-sickness touched even the 
hearts of the bravest. But such 
was not the case. Strains of song 
and laughter were heard echoing 
through the halls. The Muses dwelt 
in our presence and College Hill was 
astir with spirits of fun and good 
cheer. 

Friday and Saturday were spenl 
in the same happy spirit, each stu- 
dent having his or her own indivi- 
dual duty to perfom. A passion 
for cleanliness and domestic duties 
reigned supreme in the hearts of- all 



just at this particular time. 

Sunday was spent quietly and hap- 
pily, the students attending services 
in town. 

Monday morning dawned upon us 
all too soon, bringing with it scenes 
of winter and telling us that the 
duties of a new term were thrust 
upon us. We again entered the class- 
rooms, cheered by the presence of 
teachers and school-mates ready to 
learn new lessons. 

M. GERTRUDE HESS. 



Prof. E. E. Eshelman writing 
about Chicago says, "It ii a fast 
'City,' both good and bad, but the 
bad seems to be leading yet." 

Mr. Ober Morning, a student here 
in the winter of 1900-1901, has en- 
tered the Junior Class at Yale. He 
was one of the 2 5 out of several 
hundred who were chosen for mem- 
bership in the honorary Junior So- 
cieties of Yale. He is the first 
representative of Elizabethtown as a 
student at that great College. 



Our Chapel exercises during Bible 
Term were conducted by visiting 
Brethren as follows: — 

Thursday, Dec. 8, — B. F. Heck- 
man; Dec. 9, — J. Kurtz Miller; Dec. 
12, — E. B. Lefever: Dec. 13, — W. C. 
Sweigart: Dec. 14, — Eld. Jesse Zeig- 
lar; Rec. 15, — John Kline; Dec. 10. 
—Eld. W. H. Holsinger. 



A Misunderstood Philanthropist 

(An exercise in Rhetoric I 
One evening when we were gath- 
ered around the family table, my 
sisliT and I derided In make OUT 

small brother's Christmas a nappj 
one by taking upon ourselves the 
role of Santa Claus. 

So on Christmas Eve, about ten 
o'clock, we stole to the barn and got 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



the tree. When we came out we 
noticed tv.o men on the school 
ground but we did not think any 
thing of that. We wished to go 
down the chimney as Santa does, 
but a kitchen range was attached 
to the lower end so we decided to 
go in the back window. I helped 
my sister through and handed her 
the tree: then I tried to crawl in. 
I was on the sill when some one 
roughly grabbed me by the foot and 
pulled me down. I landed on the 
ground like a log. At the same 
time something cold grasped my 
wrists and 1 was bound. A large 
revolver po'nted directly at my head 
and a low but stern vioce snapped, 
"Come along." 

By that t.mc 1 recognized the man. 
It was Lardis. the policeman. I 
asked him whether he was crazy. 
He took a good look at me and growl- 
ed, "Von act the pact of a fool crawl- 
ing in the window at this time of 
night. There were two men around 
here I was looking for and I thought 
1 had one. But 1 see I have you, 
you young rascal." I was trying 
to tell him that I was playing Santa 
Clans, when he opened the handcuffs 
and with a strong lift and a violent 
push threw me in the window. 

E. M. CROUTHAMEL. 

Prostrate Juniper. 

From Foresl Leaves, October, 1910. 

The Prostrate Juniper, Juniperus 
Alpina of Linmeus, or Juniperus Nana 
of Willdenow, differs from the com- 
mon Juniper by the prostrate manner of 
its growth and short and less tapering, 
and mostlyasc^nding or incurved leaves. 

The first plate represents a specimen 
ou land of Christian M. Shenk, seven 
miles north of Eli/.abethtowhn, Pa., in 
Conewago township, Dauphin county, 
ou the west slope of what is known as 
"the sand hills." The tree is about 40 



feet in diameter; the shape is not round, 
but nearly square, covering 1,610 square 
feet of space; 24 inches high, spreading 
over the ground like a green carpet, ex- 
cept about 5 feet in diameter in the 
centre of tree, as shown in second plate, 
which fehows the interwoven branches as 
they spread out from the root or main 
stem in different directions over the 
ground to the extreme edge in same in- 
terwoven manner, but lying loose on the 
surface, the limbs not rooting as you 
would suppose by looking at the illus- 
tration. 

The present .Mr. Shenk tells me that 
his father knew the tree 60 years ago 
when it was only as large as a buggy 
wheel. Judging by the size then, it 
would in all probability make the tree 
about 80 years old now. The owner, be- 
ing a lover of nature, had it enclosed, 
I'll yeais ago with a post and rail fence 
to "protect and preserve it. One thing 
peculiar is the extreme southern location, 
it being in about 40 degrees north lati- 
tude, and 500 feet above sea-level. I 
have only heard of one other specimen, 
and that is near Kock House, Hocking 
county, Ohio, in the same latitude. The 
latter tree is smaller, although there may 
be others unknown to the writer. Bot- 
anists say it is found sparingly on the 
shores of the great lakes, Maine and far- 
ther north. A. (J. Tbeichlkb, 



The New School Code. 

The proposed new school code is ex- 
pected to effect many much needed re- 
forms in the public school system of 
Pennsylvania. It will come before the 
next session of the legislature for action. 

Among the new departures it proposes 
are the following: A State Board of 
Education, to be composed of six mem- 
bers, three of whom must be successful 
and experienced educators The mem- 
bers are to be appointed e n-h vear for 
six years and will™ serve ^without pay. 
The State Superintendent of public 
instruction shall be a member ex-offieio 
and will act as a president. 

The duties ot the Board will be to re- 
commend legislation for the improve- 
ment of the schools^ promote the 
efficiency of. the schpols, and the teach- 



ing force, oversee tbe finauces of the 
schools, and the equipment and general 
conditions of the buildings. It shall be 
their duty also to put into effect a 
uniform, minimum course of study for 
each of the different kinds of schools. 

Nearly everv other state in the Union 
already has a Hoard like this. Many of 
the states also have a State School Fund 
derived from the sale of public land. 
Under the new bill, Pennsylvania will 
follow their example. The income from 
the public lands of the state will be at 
the disposal of the State Board to be 
used as a school fund. 

Countv superintendents are to have 
much higher qualifications and their 
work shall be more thorough. If a 
county superintendent has more than 
150 schools, he may have an assistant 
superintendant, more than 300, two 
assistants, more than 500, three assist- 
ants, for every additional 400, an addi- 
tional assistant. The salary of an assis- 
tant superintendent, shall be a minimum 
of $1200. 

Other reforms included are : Closer 
enforcement of compulsory attend ence, 
and health regulations, greater efficiency 
in High Schools, encouragement of 
central, graded schools and transporta- 
tion of pupiis. School boards are to 
consist of odd numbers of members. 
Text books may not be changed more 
than once in rive years instead of three 
as at present and teachers are to have 
greater power in the selection of text 
books. 

All teachers' certificates are to be of a 
much higher standard. College gradu- 
ates may be granted life certificates after 
three years' successful teaching. 

No person under IS years of age or 
without a physician's certificate of good 
health shall be permitted to teach in the 
public schools of Pennsylvania. 



On account of lack of space tbe ac- 
count of Dr. Shiedt's excellent address 
on "The Importance of Biology m Kdu- 
cation," will be deferred to next issue. 



Hirsh & Bro. 

Centre Square. Next to City Hall 
LANCASTER, PA. 

Sole Agents fur the Famous 

Michaels-Stern l; e a d y-l o 

Wear Suits and Overcoats, 
Men's Furnishings ami Tail- 
oring, Plain Clothing a 
Sp«cin1tr. Sh-iellv one Price 
to All. 



"The House of 
Good Clothes'* 

Experience has taught us that our best 
interests will be the best interests of the 
man at the other end of the bargain. 




We sell 

Men's, young Men's and Children'* 

CLOTHING. HATS 

AND FURNISHINGS 



S. M. Myers & Co. 

12 East Kins Street 

LANCASTER, PENN'A 



ihs Book o to r© , ° n - falkenste™ 
Bibles, Books, Stationers, floost Garbs 



ELIZABETHTOWN 

ROLLER MILLS 

J. F. BINKELY, Propr. 

Manufacturer of Best Grades of 

FLOUR & FEED 

Use Binkley's Celebrated Mash Food 

It Makes Hens Lay. 
I LIZABFTHTOWX, - PEXXA. 



JOHN C. 


BARBERIAN 


Modern 


Shoe Repairing 


Work guaran 


teed and Prices right. 




MANHEIM STREET 



:ionery, Sodas of all ] 



Mrs. S. Hornafius' Confectionery 



POORMANS' BAKERY 

Choice Bread, Rolls and Cakes. 

HUMMELSTOWN STREET 



£. H. LEHMAN 



Co 



WOOD, GRAIN 
FLOUR. FEED 



A 



SEWER PIPE, 
ETC. 

Telephone 
ELIZABETHTOWN, PENNA. 



L 



FURNITURE 



THE MOST COMPLETE AND UP- 
TO-DATE LINE IN THIS SECTION 
OF THE COUNTRY. 

F. C. FISHER 



ELIZA BFTHTOWN, 



A. W. MARTIN 

COAL, Wool). GRAIN 
FLOUR and FEED 



ELIZABETHTOWN, - PENNA. 

S. G. HERSHEY 

Groceries, Dry 

Goods and 

Notions. 

ELIZABETHTOWN, - PENNA. 



Sll rilHI r MY GOODS, NOTIONS, F00T- 
I LnuLt WEAR ' GRPETS < linoleums 



AND OIL CLOTHS. 



S. Market & Bainbridge Sts 



ELIZABETHTOWN. PA. 



Jos. D. Hollinger, 

ROOFING & SPOUTING 
HOT AIR FU KNACKS 



Breeder of bell 'phone 

1'rizr. Winning 

Light Bra h mas 

Elizabethtown. Pa. 



Go To 
HERB'S HOOK STORE 

112-114 N. Queen St.. Lancaster, Pa. 

— for — 

BOOKS AND STATIONERY 

PENNANTS PRINTING 



Bell. 9-5. Hours 8 to (i 

DR. JEROME «. HESS 

DENTIST 

Hertzler Bldg. Elizabethtown Pa. 



AMERICAN FIELD AND POl LTRV 
FENCE 

JOS. H. RIDER f&SON 



£. L SENSE! 

General BJacksinitliinj.' 
and Repair Work 
Horse-Shoeing a Specialty. 

Park St., Elizabethtown, Pa. 



J. RALPH GROSS 
THE BARBER 

Fli/.aliethtoun, - - Peima. 



JNO. M. SHOOKERS 
WATCHMAKER AND JEWEIiER 

5 yrs. with I.. Weber & Sou 

Lancaster. Pa. 

Elizabethtown, - - Penna. 



Bell & Ind. Phones 

The Lancaster Mail Order House 

Dealers in 

New and Old Rooks 
East Orange St.. Lancaster, Pa 

For All Kinds of 

FARMING IMPLEMENTS 

Go To 

Geise & M:Bride 

ELIZABETHTOWN, - PENNA. 

BISHOP'S STUDIO 

PhotOS Of All Styles. 

Framing Neatly Executed. 



Center Squa 



Elizabethtown. Peni: 



ELIZABETHTOWN 

Dental (Parlors 



S. J. HEIXDEL, Dentist. 





Up-To-Date Sh 


>e Repairing 


We 


Guarantee You 


the Best Service 




and Materials 


S. K 


. Barnes & Son. 


South Market St. 



FIVE AM) TEN CENT STORE 
It is really wonderful what a few 
pennies will buy in our 5 and lis 
cent store and every article is useful 
about the house. Nothing in the 
store is priced for more than 10c and 
from that down to ie # 
EMZABETHTOWN, - PENNA. 



O. N. HEISEY 

Provisions, Groceries £& Choice Candies 



HEISEY BUILDING 



ELIZABETHTOWN, PENNA. 



Valentines I 



would be very nice of you to re- 
member that friend or your parents 
sending them a valentine or val- 
tine postcard. We have an excel- 
price from 1 cent to $ 1.50. 



THE HERALD BOOK STORE 



suit for almost any purpose. 

WEST HIGH STREET 



GET MY PRICES ON 

Building Material 

PAINTS, ETC. 

before purchasing. Will be 
pleased to quote on anything 
in the Hardware line. Edi- 
son Phonographs Sporting 
Goods, Kodak supplies, etc. 

GEO. A. FISHER 

ELIZABETHTOWN, - PENNA. 



/. E. BELSER 

For Rooting, Spouting, Tin and 
Granite Ware, Milk Cans. Radi- 
ators, Portable Furnaces, Granite 

l.isk Roasters in four sizes, or 
anv special orders in my line. 
Give me a trial. 

Opp. Exchange Hank 

ELIZABETHTOWN, - PENNA. 



SUBSCRIBE FOR 

OUR COLLEGE TIMES 
50c. PER YEAR 



0. C. RENSEL 

Choice Bread, Rolls 
& Cakes of All Kinds 

Prompt Deliver?. 

S. Market St. 

ELIZABETHTOWN, - PENNA. 



KUHN'S 

CHOICE BREAD AND 
CAKES 

Weddings and parties supplied 
with Fancy Cakes at short 
n itice. South Market Street. 

ELIZABETHTOWN, - PENNA. 



Harry Miller 
Furniture & Underktaing 

Furniture Repairing & Upholstering 
Picture Framing 

Bell Phone 



Elizabeth town, 



Penna, 



G. WM. REISNER 

Manufacturing Jeweler, Class and 
Fraternity Pins, Pennants, Banners 



An early start, a steady pace. 
Is our way to win the race. 
We would advise those who can. 
Adopt a system, work the plan. 
Mod. in methods, nowadays, 
Are commendable in many ways 

AT NISSLEY'S 
LUNCH AND PINING ROOMS 

14-10 E. Chestnut St., Lancaster, Pa. 



ELIZABETHTOWN COLLEGE FACULTY 



D. C. REBER, A. M. Pd. D., President 
Philosophy, Pedagogy, German. 

H. K. OBER, Pd. B., Vice President, 
Biological Science, Agriculture, 
Surveying. 

ELIZABETH MYER, M. E., 

Elocution and Grammer. 
B. F. WAMPLER, B. E., 

Director of Music, Voice Culture. 
FLORA GOOD WAMPLER, 

Piano, Organ, Harmony. 
J. G. MEYER, Pd. B., A. B., 

Mathematics, Physical Science. 

History. 

MARY E. MARKLEY, A. M.. 

English, Latin and French. 

J. Z. HERR Prin. Commercial Dep't, 
Bookkeeping, Penmanship, Com- 
mercial Law. 



JACOB S. HARLEY, A. B., 

Geography, History and Civica 

LYDIA STAUFFER, 
English Bible. 

LEAH M. SHEAFFER, Pd. B.. 

Piano, Organ, Drawing, Physi- 
cal Culture. 

R. W. SCHLOSSER, Pd. B., 
Latin and Algebra. 

ELIZABETH KLINE, 

Piano, English Branches. 

ANNA W. WOLGEMUTH, 

Shorthanl and Typewriting. 

DAISY P. RIDER, Pd. B.. 

(Absent on Leave.) 
LAURA B. HESS, 

Sewing. 
ELD. S. H. HERTZLER, 

Exegesis (Bible Term). 



Contents 

A Digest of Dr. K. C. Scbiedt's Address on Education - - 10 

Alumni Notes ........ 7 

College Note Book ....... 12 

Editorial ......... 3 

February First - - - - - - - - 3 

Journalism and its Call ....... 3 

Is May Peculiar ....... in 

Letter from Alaska ....... s 

Literary .....-.-- 7 

Locals - - - • - - - - -11 

Religious Appointments ...... 14 

Recognition of Classes - - - - - - - "> 

School News - - - - .- - - • 11 

The Best of It 7 

The Place of Physical Culture in Oar Institution - - 4 

The Spring Term ........ 5 

What is a .Man ....-.-- e 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



ELIZABETHOWN, PA., FEBRUARY, 1911. 



EDITORIAL STAFF: 

ELIZABETH MYER, Editor-in-Chief 

HOLMES FALKENSTEIN, Associate Editor WALTER F. ESHLEMAN, Exchanges 

LEAH M. SHEAFFER, Alumni News MAZIE .MARTIN, Locals 

B. F. WALTZ, Society News GERTRUDE MILLER, Stenographer 

R. W. SCHI.OSSER, Business Manager 



Our CnLLEr.p Tutu* is published monthly, except 
The pap-*r will be sent contiuous'y to old subscribers, so as rot t< 
unless notice to <!im jntinue has been received at expiration. 

Report changes of address, and failure to receive this paper r.gul 
Terms : Fifty cents per year, 10 cents monthly. 
Entered at the Post Office at Elizabethtow 



August and September. 

i as r ot to break their files, and arrearage: 



Second-Class Matter, April 19, 1909. 



EDITORIAL 

February First 

sing, O Year, of melting snows. 
Of thawing icebergs out at sea; 
sing of Winters past and gone, — 

look before and see the dawn 
Of glorious Springtime, yet to be! 



realms 



lot is 



'Twixt two blight 

cast, — 
One where the white world lies at 

rest; 
The other, waking out of night, 
Is upward striving for the light, 
.With flowers upon its breast. 

I look. I wait; I sing again — 
O worlds, ye both are dear! 

Farewell, white shores just drifting 
by; 

Behold, the vernal land draws nigh — 
And February's here! 



Our daily lives are made up of 
ie little things that creep in among 
ir duties and divide our thoughts 
ir a lime, giving us sometimes a 
ickward glance, and sometimes a 
trward glimpse into the future. 



Like Feburary. we, too, are between 
the snows of the past and the blos- 
soms of the dawning future. Let 
us find something sweet to remem- 
ber, and something bright to hope 
for. 

Journalism and Its Call 

The three greatest educational 
lore-:, in this country are the 
schools, the press and the pulpit. 
Of these the press reaches by far the 
most people. Nearly everybody 
reads the newspapers and magazines 
more or less. The average man 
gulps down his morning meal while 
reading the morning newspaper; and 
in the evening, after the work in 
store, shop, or factory is finished, he 
scans the pages of the evening news- 
paper. 

The newspaper is the universal 
educator. It acquaints us each day 
with what man is doing. It is the 
means whereby we get our informa- 
tion on public and political ques- 
tions and we must form our judg- 
ments by its bel]). It is the modern 
Forum, the Academy of the 20th 
century We can fancy that if Soc- 



OUB COLLEGE TIMES 



rates were to walk this earth once 
more, we would not find him holding 
dialogues on the street corners, but 
we would read in the daily press 
his double column interveiws on 
the immortality of the soul. We 
can imagine Julius Caesar running 
the gauntlet of a battery of cam- 
eras and being besieged by report- 
ers anxious to "scoop" his story of 
the Gallic War. If Christ, the great 
Teacher, were to live in our day he 
would doubtless seek to reach the 
minds and hearts of men through 
the medium of the press. 

Since the press is the agent that 
supplies the people with informa- 
tion and intelligence we can easily 
see what a vital factor it has 
become in our civilization, and what 
a tremendous responsibility the edi- 
tor must bear. The fathers of the 
republic exercised great wisdom in 
securing freedom of the press. A 
free press is a sure guarantee against 
tyranny and despotism. The journa- 
list is a watchman, as it were, on 
the walls of the republic. The 
journalist who betrays his trust, 
who uses his power for base ends, 
is in the same class as the lawyer 
who pollutes the fountain of justice, 
or the minister who disgraces the 
cloth. 

Despite its wonderful power and 
possibilities the press is far from 
ideal. The average newspaper is 
sadly lacking both in the language 
it uses and in the thought expressed. 
Instead of furnishing high standards 
and correct models of language most 
newspapers murder the king's Eng- 
lish without mercy anil this has giv- 
en rise to the familiar, stilted, dis- 
gusting style known as in 
English. 

Much more might be s:) id of the 
thought in the newspapers of today. 

i.et one typical instance Buffice to 



show the low standard of the news- 
papers in this respect. Not many 
years ago it happened that a great 
American poet passed away on the 
same day that a great prize fight 
occured. Not only tie "yellow press" 
but practically the press of every 
other color came out the next day 
with column after column about the 
brutal exhibition while a small arti- 
cle on an inside page told of the 
death of the man vhose name will 
be loved and respe 'ted as long as 
time shall last. How long will the 
newspapers continue to thrust upon 
us the wickedness, the misery, the 
depravity of humanity? How long 
will it be until a lecture or a ser- 
mon will receive as much space as 
a murder case or a divorce trial does 
now? Would there were a Cicero to 
exclaim, "O the times! O the man- 
ners!" or an Addison to make sport 
of the follies of the age. 

What is the call to journalism? 
The profession of journalism is call- 
ing for young men of trained minds 
and high ideals, seekers after truth 
and uplifters of humanity. Journal- 
ism needs men who will refuse to 
stoop to sensationalism, exaggeration 
and deception; who will refuse to 
be tools of the party machine and 
of the predatory corporation. The 
press is calling for men who will 
realize its possibilities and lift it to 
the high plane that it justly deserves. 
When such men fill the editorial 
chairs the press of our country will 
i ei ome ■■< mighty force for truth and 
righteousness, "terrible as an army 
with banners." 

II. s. IV 

The Place of Physical culture in Onr 
Institution 

The expression, — "in the sweat of 

thy face thou shalt eat thy bread" 

i ii widely misinterpreted and 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



much misunderstood. Activity of 
muscular fiber is essential to growth 
and strength and development 
The same finger which wrote the 
decalogue has written into the human 
body equally fundamental and eter- 
nal laws, the neglect and violation 
of which bring pain and punishment 
upon all who thus thoughtlessly or 
Galley 2. 

intentionally violate these laws. In 
order that the body may keep well 
it must have fresh air and muscular 
exercise. With this in view, the 
Physical Culture Association of Eliza- 
bethtown College aims to encourage 
and foster proper physical exercise. 
It encourages outdoor exercises, es- 
pecially the playing of basket ball 
when it is played according to the 
regular adopted rules, eliminating 
the rough, boisterous, and dangerous 
phases which are justly objectionable 
in football. At the same time it af- 
fords such splendid opportunity for 
all round muscular activity as well 
as the exercise of judgment, accur- 
acy, alertness, that the Association 
feels it affords a method of helpful 
exercise. 

Tennis, from the nature of the 
case, is a very ideal exercise; but 
as it can be pla-ed only during time 
of fine weather, basket ball is called 
upon to take its place during the 
winter months. The Physical Cul- 
ture Association of our College is 
anxio is to get all the good and value 
out of all these various exer- 
cises, minus all the dangerous, bois- 
terous, and injurious features which 
are so prevalent in many of the pres- 
ent day College Athletic Sports. 
This Association holds a public meet- 
ing monthly, at which time various 
phasfs of physical exercise are dis- 
cusse 1. A few weeks ago a very in- 
teresting public meeting was held. 
This is to be repeated every term. 



A student must care for his body as 
well as for his mind. Next to re- 
ligion, health is paramount, and must 
receive first consideration. 

H. K. O. 

THE SPRING TERM 

Reorganization of Classes 

The Spring Term opens this year 
on March 27 and class-work begins 
at 1.0 p. m. It continues twelve 
weeks. Many new classes will be 
formed and all class-work will be 
reorganized. For this reason special 
advantages are offered to prospective 
teachers and to regular teachers who 
desire to pursue advanced studies. 
Pupils in the public schools wishing 
to review common school branches 
or take up others, as well as those 
aiming to prepare for college, may 
enter at this time with profit. 
The Faculty 

The Faculty consisting of twelve 
regular professors and several stu- 
dent teachers is stronger than at 
anytime in the history of the institu- 
tion and is amply large to provide for 
additional classes during the Spring 
Term. The Faculty represents the 
scholarship and training of such in- 
stitutions as Millersville State Nor- 
mal School, Juniata College, Ursinus 
College, Franklin & Marshall College, 
Bridgewater College, Bethany Bible 
School, University of Pennsylvania, 
Leland Stanford University, Colum- 
bia University and New York Univer- 
sity. 

Departments of Instruction 

Pedagogical. This department is 
regularly maintained and offers a 
three years' course which will be en- 
larged to cover four years next year. 
Graduates in this course are quali- 
fied to teach in the township High 
Schools of this State. The following 
subjects will be taught during the 







OUli COLLEGE TIMES 



Spring Term: Elementary Pedagogy, 
Methodology, Genetic Psychology, 
Systems of Education, and Philoso- 
phy of Teaching. 

English Scientific. Classes in all 
the common school branches will be 
formed suited to the needs of those 
coming from the public schools. Be- 
sides Civics, Algebra, American Liter- 
ature, Physical Geography, Higher 
Arithmetic, Botany, Chemistry, Draw- 
ng, Astronomy and General History 
also will be taught. 

College Preparatory. Classes in 
Caesar, Cicero, and Virgil as well as 
in Latin Elements, Geometry, Eng- 
lish History, English Classics, Etymo- 
logy, Trigonomotry will be con- 
ducted. 

Commercial. The Comn ercial 
Course has been thoroughly rsvised 
and we are glad to announce that 
our facilities for giving a comn ercial 
education are equal to the besi . In- 
struction will be given in Bookkeep- 
ing, Commercial Arithmetic, Rapid 
Calculation, Business Correspond- 
ence, Shorthand and Typewriting. 

Music. Daily instruction and prac- 
tice in chorus singing and sight- 
reading are offered to our regular 
students. Voice Culture, Harmony, 
Theory of Music, Piano and Organ 
lessons are given at the usual price. 
Four teachers and six instrument 
constitute the equipment for tl is de- 
partment. 

Industrial. Instruction in Elemen- 
tary Agriculture is given to accom- 
modate those expecting to pursue the 
Agricultural Course and to prepare 
teachers in this subject which will 
soon be inserted in the Public School 
curriculum by legislative enactment. 

Bible. Students are urged to take 
Bible work in some form in every 
course offered by the institution. 
A number of classes in Bible study 
will meet daily. Classes in Mission 



study and Sunday School Normal 

work besides the regular Sunday 

morning Bible classes meet weekly. 

Expenses. 

Tuition for day students per week 
is $1.25. Tuition for boarding stu- 
dents per term $18.50. Total for 
boarding students for the term $5 5. 
Reductions to ministers and children 
of ministers. 

Additional Information. 

Work during the Spring Term will 
count towards completing the sever- 
al courses. If you are interested in 
the excellent opportunities offered at 
Elizabethtown College for a practical 
education, write at once for our re- 
cent catalogue. Those expecting to 
board in the buildings should make 
early application for a room to the 
President. 



Exactness 
A great deal of the joy of life con- 
sists in doing perfectly, or at least 
to the best of one's ability, every- 
thing which he attempts to do. 
There is a sense of satisfaction, a 
pride, in surveying such a work — a 
work which is rounded, full, exact. 
complete in all its parts — which the 
superficial man, who leaves his work 
in a slovenly, slip shod, half-finished 
condition, can never know. It is 
this conscientious completeness which 
turns work into art. The smallest 
thing, well done, becomes artistic. 



What Is a Man.' 

"A little Soul bearing up a corpse ." 
— Epictetus. 

"The masterpie e of over-daring 
Nature."- Zoroasti r. 

"The glory and the scandal of the 
universe." — Pascal 

"One more lump of clay to hold 
the world together." — Emerson. 

"The end of man. — To do his duty, 
and to the tell the truth." -Stoics, 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



LITERARY 

The Best of It. 

When the morn wakes overcast 
And the loneliness is vast, 

Make the best of it. 
If the Birds refuse to sing, 
If the bells of joy won't ring, 
Make the best of everything. 

Make the best of it. 
Nature has her crying spells, 
Joy can't always ring its bells. 

Make the best of it. 
Make the best of daily life 
When despondency is rife, 
Good will come out of the strife. 

Make the best of it. 
Hears must know their share of pain 
Life must know a little rain. 

Make the lest of it. 
Make the best of ev'ry day; 
Futu -e morns won't be so gray, 
Fight the gloo n tha clouds your 

You'll get the best of it. 

Ey JOE CONE. 

Exchanges 

Th'3 Christmas numbers of the 
College papers contain interesting 
stories of Yuletide. "The Meaning 
of CI ristnas" in "Purple and Gold" 
emphasizes the teaching of the story 
of the Christ Child. 

Th i "Symposium on Peace" in 
"Nor>nal Vidette" gives a comprehen- 
sive view why bloodshed should 
cease. 

"Law should cease to be a scienti- 
fic g;me that might be won or lost 
by playing some particular move but 
we eight to establish the Latin Max- 
im of Blackstoue — Interest rei pub- 
lical ut finis lit um." Juniata Echo. 
"Old Time's great clock, that never 
stops 

Nor runs too fast nor slow. 
Hung up amid the worlds of space, 

Where wheeling planets glow." 

— College Rays. 



"The larger altruism is preventa- 
tive and reformatory. Hence it builds 
character and abolishes the saloon 
rather than throws a sop to the 
drunkard and establishes an orphan's 
home. It 'educates and moralizes 
the growing youth, develops worthful 
taste and frugal habits." 

— Purple and Gold. 

"It seems evident that every pupil 
should be taught somewhere at some 
time at least four things: (1) the 
existence of God as the Creator of 
the universe; (2) the brotherhood 
of man; (3) the dignity and value 
of life; (4) the moral order of the 
universe." — Normal Vidette. 

"The woman who has learned to 
think systematically and has learned 
not only how to control herself, 
but others, is given a higher place 
in the homes in our country, and she 
deserves it, for what other one thing 
is doing as much for the progress of 
a nation as the one who is molding 
human lives. Just so surely as the 
home is made attractive just that 
surely will our girls and boys have 
a desire to remain at home. And 
just so surely as you see a young 
man thoughtful and kind to his 
mother just that sure you may be 
of his faithfulness to duty." 

— College Rays. 

We cheerfully acknowledge the 
following exchanges; Purple and 
White, Red and Black, Purple and 
Gold, Friendship Banner, Juniata 
Echo, Lordsburg College Educator, 
Ursinus Weekly, and Philamathean 
Monthly for December; College Rays, 
Hebron Star, Normal Vidette, and 
Linden Hall Echo for January. 

WALTER ESHELMAN. 

Alumni Notes 
Miss Elizabeth Kline. '10, spent 
her Christmas vacation at Ridgely, 
Md., conducting a series of vocal 



OUR COLLEGE TLUKS 



lessons. She met with pronounced 
success in her work. This is proved 
by the following clipping, taken from 
a Ridgely paper and sent to Chicago 
and thence back to Elizabethtown. 
"The vocal training class which 
has been conducted the entire week 
both morning and evening by Miss 
Kline, of Elizabethtown, Pa., at the 
Church of the Brethren, will con- 
tinue until next Tuesday morning. 
Miss Kline is very successful in her 
efforts to impart knowledge of mus- 
ic, doing it in a very genial and 
pleasing manner. She has at her 
command not only the science, but 
art as well. The attendance has 
been very good during her stay, and 
on next Sunday, both morning and 
evening, she will lead the church 
music. All are invited." 

Mr. L. W. Lieter, '10, is consider- 
ing the offer of a position in one 
of the banks of his home town. He 
is at present a student here and we 
should feel very keenly his loss if 
he accepted it. 

Mr. Roy Engle is at present filling 
a position in the city of "brotherly 
love." Philadelphia, at present 
claims six of our graduates: — Daisy 
P. Rider, Elizabeth Zortman, Viola 
Withers, H. K. Garman, E. Roy Engle 
and Isaac Z. Hackman. This little 
number may become the nucleus of 
the organization of the Philadelphia 
branch of the Alumni Association of 
Elizabethtown College. 

Will E. Glasmire has accepted a 
position as bookkeeper for a lumber 
firm at Palmyra. 

Miss Lottie Becker, 'Id. is al pres- 
ent acting as private secretary to 
Prof. H. K. Ober. 

Miss B. Mary Royer spent the 
Christmas holidays at her b 

Richland. Since then she has not 
been able to return to her wi rk at 
Mokesvllle bei aui e ol the Illness t I 



her great aunt, whom she is now 
nursing. What a spirit of self-sac- 
rifice! 

See the long article in this issue by 
our Alaska representative. His ad- 
dress is Circle, Alaska. 

LEAH SHEAFFER. 

Letter From Alaska. 

Circle, Alaska, Dec. 15, 1910. 

Lear Editor: — At the request of 
some of my college friends to write 
an article for the "Times," I take 
pleasure in mailing this letter for 
publication, and I'll try not to make 
it sound too cold. 

My whole trip from Elizabethtown 
to the Arctics was a very pleasant 
and profitable one, and at times rath- 
er exciting. I was delayed many 
hours by the raging forest fires in 
Montana, Idaho and Washington. 
Having been advised by the Bureau 
to go by way of the Klondike district, 
where I spent one week in the mines, 
I sailed for Skaguay, Alaska, be- 
cause from that point I could go one 
hundred and ten miles over the 
mountains by rail. This is the only 
road in Alaska, excepting short min- 
ing roads, and it was my best way 
of reaching the head of naviga- 
tion on the Yukon. 

The scenery from Seattle to Ska- 
guay is wonderful. I quote from the 
Alaska-Yukon Magazine; "Here is 
a coast line of one thousand miles. 
an enchanted water-way which offers 
advantages Buch as no other coast 
line of the globe can boast. The 
famous fiord;, of Norway are here re- 
ed in all 'heir t lanscedent 
beauty and unmi id by the hand 
of I i\ Utzatli ii I inland 

system ol I eani canals with its 

scenes of ravishing beauty, will with- 
in a lew years lie oine the 

ynus of the greatest Beet of pleasure 
craft in the world." Add to this the 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



seductive voice of gold and the allur- 
ing call of the wild and you can feel 
something of the irresistible charm 
that has caught in its net all who 
have passed that way. 

The beauties of this country along 
the Yukon are no less charming, 
rather more so because of the great 
variety. As I look across the tundra 
by the light of the Aurora, I can see 
"Old Baldy" carrj ing his sublime 
head high in the clouds as if he were 
trying to unite the world with World. 
The December and January sun may 
be seen at noon just above the south- 
ern horizon and. for a few minutes, 
seems to rest on the mountains like 
a great red ball and then disappears. 
At this writing the thermometer reg- 
isters sixty-five below, but every par- 
ticle of moisture is frozen, and at 
times these may be seen dropping in 
the mild light like a shower of so 
many minute diamonds. Our long 
night of three months is never dark 
or monotonous, and the beauties of 
the moon light and the various hues 
of the Aurora reflected by the snow 
and ice must be seen to be appreci- 
ated. The climatic conditions in gen- 
eral make one feel glad that he is 
alive. 

This is of course distinctly a min- 
ing and game country, but it is re- 
markable what progress the agricul- 
tural experiment stations have made 
lately, especially in the south and 
east. Their great problem is to find 
a grain that will mature before the 
frost, but even at this latitude (sixty- 
six) the continuous summer sun 
makes it possible to grow vegetables 
quite superior to any in the states. 

If Alaska an 1 its resources are to 
be devi loped, it must have boosters 
- that's all— -but they must be the 
right kind. For fourteen years the 
miners have been looting the coun- 
try, leaving little behind to show for 



the vast wealth they carry away. 
But those who have come to call 
Alaska "home," welcome the invas- 
ion of capital and enterprise, and 
they plead for men who will build 
churches, schools, court-houses, rail- 
roads, and cities. 

Circle is an old camp. Its popu- 
lation, including about thirty whites, 
will at no time during the year ex- 
ceed two hundred; however, there 
are hundreds of men working in the 
mines within a hundred miles and 
this place is the shipping point to 
these mines. I am fortunate in 
many ways in having Circle City as 
my post. It is on the main mail 
route. Many of the camps get but 
one or two mails during the winter. 
The United States army has a wire- 
less station here which is indeed very 
convenient for me, and I frequently 
use it in communication with my 
superiors both in Alaska and Wash- 
ington in regard to some matter de- 
manding quick decision. The miners' 
association supports a library here 
which is equal to the Carnegie 
library in the Klondike district, in 
proportion to the population of the 
two places. 

It is impossible for me to go into 
detail in regard to my work, so I 
shall try to give simply a general 
view of it. I am sorry to learn that 
so many of my friends who write to 
me have indeed a very false ilea 
of it. My work is limited entirely 
to the natives of Circle and the rur- 
rounding country with a radius of 
about fifty miles. I have no dealings 
with the whites other than commer- 
cial. I am of course commissio led 
as a teacher, and although I have day 
and night classes for both children 
and adults, and a Saturday night 
class for men only, my school rcom 
duties are not the most difficult phase 

of my work. (Continued in next issus.) 



10 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



A Digest of Dr. It. C. Shiedt's Ad- 
dress on the Importance of Biolo- 
gy in Education 

Before discussing Biology in Edu- 
cation Prof. Shiedt discussed educa- 
tion in general. He denned Educa- 
tion as the eternal process of super- 
ior adjustment of the physically and 
mentally developed, free, conscious, 
human being to God and his laws 
as manifested in the intellectual, 
emotional, and volitional environ- 
ment of man. He said the aim of 
Education should be the development 
of all the powers of man in order to 
enable the individual to unfold his 
life and render efficient service to 
his fellow men, to his country and 
to his God. 

The fowls of the air and the beasts 
of the fields are slaves of their en- 
vironment. Man is master of his en- 
vironment. By means of his superior 
intelligence and his knowledge of 
God's laws man is enabled to sub- 
due the earth and make himself 
master of creation. Hence, man's 
first and highest duty is to search 
out God's truths as found in his crea- 
tion. 

Education may be divided into two 
parts — subjective and objective edu- 
cation. The former treats of man 
himself while the latter has to do 
with things outside of man. Under 
subjective education comes the study 
of languages. Here Prof. Shiedt 
made a masterful and unanswerable 
argument in favor of Latin and 
Greek. He said the study of the 
classics is necessary to acquaint us 
with the ancients and make us part 
and parcel of the human race. 

Under objective education conies 
the study of natural sciences includ- 
ing Biology. He said man needs to 
know not only about himself bul 
about the great world of nature In 
Which he lives. He is not educated, 



he cannot subdue the world, until he 
acquaints himself with the laws, and 
principles that govern the universe. 
But Biology and the other natural 
sciences have an ideal as well as a 
pratical value. In studying creation 
we see the hand of the Creator mani- 
fest on every hand. Our souls are 
uplifted as we learn to appreciate 
and love nature and through it na- 
ture's God. H. S. F. 

Is May Peculiar? 

(Class Work in Rhetoric.) 
I would like to know whether May 
Evans is peculiar or not? She is 
ten years old :.nd so am I. But she 
is not a bit like me. When I tell 
Ma what Mar does and what she 
won't do, Ma says. "She must be a 
peculiar little girl." So now I will 
call her peculiar too. She never 
goes coasting and all we girls just 
love to coast. And when the bell 
rings and we must go to school we 
always find May there already busy 
at her work. Of course May is al- 
ways "up-head" but when we have 
coasting or skating I don't think of 
my books. S;ie never goes out at 
recess and won't help us to play any 
games. Another thing she does not 
do that I think is so queer is "play 
with dolls." She had a prettier doll 
than any of mine and what do you 
think! She jrave it to her cousin. 
But what I think is strangest of all 
is that she does not like ice-cream, 
or fudge. Now don't you think she 
must lie peculiar? 

MARY HERSHEY. 



The memo* ra of our Missionary 
Reading Circle have arranged to visit 
in tin- homes of the afflicted and eld- 
erly i pie in Elizabethtown on Sun- 
day afternoons. While we have much 

of the theoretical in Mission Study, 

lei oi have more of the practical. 



on; COLLEGE TIMES 



n 



SCHOOL NEWS 

The results of New Year resolu- 
tions are shown in the renewed ener- 
gy that students and teachers put 
into their work since the holiday 
vacation. 

The first among the students to 
leave for vacation were Mr. Fred 
Burgess of West Virginia, Mr. Isaac 
Wampler, of Virginia, and Mr. Ord 
Strayer. of Brooklyn. 

Soon after January fust all the 
students enrolle 1 had returned and 
with them some new ones. 

Miss Elizabeth Kline spent her 
vacation in Ridglev, [d., where she 
conducted a singii g class. 

Miss Stauffer spent part of her 
vacation as the guest of friends in 
Lancaster and of Miss Myer and Miss 
Shaeffer at their homes in Bareville. 

Dec. 2 7. Mrs. B. F. Wampler at- 
tended the wedding of her brother, 
L. M. Good and Miss Amy John, of 
Lykens, Pa. The marriage took place 
at the home of the bride's parents. 
Mr. and Mrs. Good will live in Har- 
risburg 

Miss Mark ley spent the holiday 
vacation at her home in Zanesville, 
Ohio. She had not seen her folks 
for a year. 

During the holidays Dr. Reber 
spent a day in attending the sessions 
of the ?tnte Teachers' Association 
which was held in Harrisburg. 

Prof, and Mrs. Wampler spent 
most of their holi 'ay vacation in 
Ephrata where Prof. Wampler con- 
ducted a Singing Class. 

Jan. 8, Prof. Oh r visited Ridgely 
Md. in the interests of the Sunday 
School work. 

The lecture by Dr. W. J. Stanley 
of X. V. given on the evening of 



Jan. 12, in the College Chapel was 
most enthusiastically received. This 
lecture was among the best ever giv- 
en here, and we hope Dr. Stanley 
will return next year. 

Howard Merkey, a former student 
now teaching a school in Rapho 
township, Lancaster Co., visited 
friends at the College, Jan. 13. 

The Rev. Z. A. Jones, of Rock Hill, 
South Carolina, a representative of 
a school for the colored race, visited 
us on Wednesday, Jan. 11. 

Mr. R. W. Schlosser who had been 
confined to the house for a few days 
recently on account of illness, is able 
to attend to his work again. He was 
visited by his parents and sister fom 
Schoeneck, on Jan. 4. 

As the College orchard has teen 
recorded on the list of experimental 
orchards of the state, it is now urder 
its direct supervision and will be in- 
spected each year. Mr. E. C. Bowars, 
Petersburg, Pa., an employee of Prof. 
Surface, State Zoologist, Harrisburg, 
Pa., made the first inspection on 
Jan. and also gave valuable in- 
formation on pruning of all kind ; of 
fruit trees. Mr. Harry G. Longe- 
necker, a student in our Agricultural 
Department, accompanied Mr. Bow- 
ers through the College orchard \nd 
received the instruction as they 
passed from tree to tree. 

Miss Myer was recently called to 
Lancaster to discuss Home Depart- 
ment -S. S. Work with a friend who 
has been chosen superintendent of 
the work in a church in Northern 
Lancaster County. 

Misses Rebekah and Leah Sheaffer 
spent Sunday, Jan. 15, at their home 
in Bareville, Pa. 

Since the holidays the Basket Ball 
Association has reorganized, and new 
regulations and rules have been 
adopted. Prof. J. Z, Herr was elect- 



12 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



ed referee for the gentlemen, and 
Miss Markley for the ladies. 

MAZIE MARTIN. 

College Note Book 

The friends of Prof. Edward C. 
Bixler will be interested to learn of 
his marriage to Miss Margaret Eng- 
ler, of New Windsor, Maryland, on 
December 29. The newly married 
couple will live in North Manchester, 
Indiana, where Dr. Bixler is president 
of North Manchester College. Dr. 
Bixler was for several years Profes- 
sor of Latin in Elizabethtown Col- 
lege. 

Our College Times extends hearty 
congratulations and best wishes to 
these "newly wedded friends. 

A letter from Miss Orca Miller 
states that her father is improving 
slowly. 

On Friday, December 30, a little 
girl, known as Mary Francis, came 
to the home of Mr. and Mrs. John 
Hershman, Mechanicsburg, Pa. Mr. 
Hershman was formerly a student at 
our College. 

A note from Miss Gertrude Speel- 
man says, "I enjoy the College Times 
very much. Jt brings back fond 
recollections of the few pleasant days 
1 spent at Elizabethtown College in 
the past, and I regret I could not at- 
tend the Bible Term this winter." 

The American Cul n Furnace Com- 
pany, of Philadelphia has decided to 
build a factory in Elizabethtown. 
The citizens of this vicinity have 
raised the amount of $5,000 which 
warrants the purchase of ground for 
building. 

Our last year's janitor, Mr. S. M 
Ziegler, when last heard of was on 
his way from Abilene, Kansas, to 
York, Pa. We suppose he thinks 
Pennsylvania is not such a bad place 
after all. Perhaps Elizabethtown 
will see him come around as a visitor 



some of these days. 

On Sunday, January 15, Prof. H. K. 
Ober visited the Sunday School at 
Shamokin, Pa., and on the following 
Sunday, he expected to be at Royers- 
ford and Parkersford in Montgomery 
County, Pa. Duty still causes him 
to be absent from College much of 
his time. 

Miss Hettie Stauffer, who had ac- 
companied Bro. A. C. Wieand and 
others on a trip to Palestine, has re- 
cently returned to America. She 
reached Elizabethtown College on 
Saturday evening, January 14. She 
will spend several weeks here visit- 
ing her sister Lydia, who is teacher 
in our Bible department. During her 
stay here she will conduct a Bible 
Class in the Church of the Brethren 
in Elizabethown Her thrilling stor- 
ies of the experiences of the party 
with whom she traveled were listened 
to with intense interest. Their mi- 
raculous escape from the hands of 
the Bedouins in the Moabite country- 
east of the Dead Sea is simply mar- 
vellous. After we heard her stories 
some of us fel like singing songs of 
praise to God vvho had so graciously 
delivered these brethren and sisters. 
.Much gratitudi is due Mr. A. Forder 
for the skillful manner in which he 
lead these pilgrims through this dis- 
turbed country. 

We note v ith deep regret the 
deaths of Dr. qnd Mrs. A. R. Byer- 
ly of Millersvi'le. Several members 
ot" our College faculty have been stu- 
dents under Dr. Byerly who was for 
many, many y ars teacher in ancient 
languages in the Millersville Normal 
School. We extend to the family and 
friends of the deceased our heart- 
felt sympathies. 

Mr. Wendell Baker, a student some 
years ago, is row traveling salesman 
tor iii.' w M. Griffin Company of 
Indiana. Mr u conveyed by his own 



OUK COLLKCK TI.MKS 



horse and wagon through sections of 
Lebanon and Lancaster counties. 

On Tuesday evening, January 17, as 
Russell shank was returning from college 
to his home, his horse became fractious, 
and in prancing the harness was torn 
making it impossible for the driver to 
control the horse. fir. Shank was 
thrown out and sustaine 1 such injuries 
as to cause him to be absent from the 
college the remainder of the week. We 
were glad to welcome him back on Mon- 
day, January 21. 

Mr. C. VV. Guthrie ha; been very ill 
since January 1. He is confined to his 
bed in the home of P. of. E. E. Eshel- 
man, both of them beinf students in the 
Bethany Bible School in Chicago. 

Harry J. Coble, of Blairsburg, Iowa, 
formerly of the vicinity of Elizabeth- 
town, enrolled as a stud -nt January 21. 
He is a son of Abram Coble, who once 
owned a farm near Hershey, Pa. 

On January 22, Mr. Condry .Long, of 
Mechanicsburg, Pa., visited at the Col- 
lege and decided before leaving to return 
as a student on the following Monday. 

January 21. — Miss Markley is a hap- 
pier woman to-day than she was last 
y?ar at this time. Why? Because one 
who loves the society of friends and who 
is devoted to her work as a teacher, 
does not enjoy a quarantine of three 
week's duration. 

Miss Mary Hershey, daughter of J. 
W. U. Hershey, of Lititz, was called 
home very unexpectedly on January 21, 
her help being very much needed there 
on account of the lingering illness of her 
little sister Helen. We hope to have 
Miss Hershey back again as soon as 
circumstances will allow her return. 

We appreciate the chivalry of Mr. 
Robert Nedrow, manifested in the Heb- 
Star, on the "perfectly harmless" ques- 
tion. 

Our Winter Term closes Thursday, 
March 23 at 12 o'clock noon. The Spring 



Term opens Monc'ay March 27 at 1:00 
P.M. All who expect to board at the 
college during the Spring Term should 
engage rooms early. Address all com- 
munications to Dr. D. C. Reber, Presi- 
dent. 

Read the Spring Term announcement 
as found on another page of this issue. 

Don't forget the lecture to be given in 
the College Chapi 1 on Feb. 9, at 8:00 P. 
M., by Dr. W. Qi ay Rosselle on "The 
University of Adversity." We were 
much gratified to have such a large au- 
dience at our last lecture, and we hope 
even more of our friends will make it a 
point to hear this one. 

Miss Mary Balmer has enrolled for 
evening work at the College. Who'll be 
the next? 

Society Notes 

We are glad to say that the inter- 
est in Literary Society work is in- 
creasing. Many new members have 
been received. All who take part do 
their best. We are looking forward 
to the time when Literary work will 
receive the same credit as any study 
in the College curriculum. 

Surely ours is a great inheritance. 
By studying the questions of the 
day one is not only bettered, but is 
of more use to his fellow men when 
he leaves school. 

The program given Jan. 13, was as 
follows: — 

Music — Dear Old Song, Mixed 
Quartette; Reading — Bill Nye and 
the Hornets, Mr. Wenger; Recita- 
tion — The Blacksmith's Story, Miss 
Mabel Weaver; Music — Just Beyond, 
Mixed Quartette; Debate — Resolved, 
That Carnegie's ten millions given to 
the World's Peace Fund, have been 
put to the best use. Affirmative 
speakers, — Miss Ada Brandt, Mr. 
Aaron Gish. Negative speakers, — 
Miss Mary Hershey, Mr. C. R. Mar- 
tin; Music — Pennsylvania, Mixed 
Quartette, 

B. F. WALTZ. 



Religious Appointments 

Regular Preaching Services: — 

Jan. S, 10 a. m. — Sermon by Eld. 

S. H. Hertzler. Text, James 1: 

17. Subject — "Gratitude." 
Jan. 15, 7.30 p. m. — Sermon by 

Eld. G. N. Falkenstein. Text, 

Luke 15:11-31. Subject — "A 

Young Man's Ideal." 
Christian Workers' Meeting: — 

Jan. 15 — Miss Hettie Stauffer 

spoke 
Mid-week Prayer Meetings: — 
Jan. 3 — Led by Nora Reber. 
Jan. 10 — Led by Pierce Edris. 
Jan. 18 — Miss Hettie Stauffer 

spoke on life and customs of the 

Arabs. 
Sunday Bible Classes: — 

Every Sunday at *.lo a. m. 
International S. S. lessons taught 

by Prof. Myer and Miss Stauffer, 
Missionary Reading Circle: — 
Teacher, Miss Lydia Stauffer. 
Reading — "Modern Apostles in 

Missionary By-ways." 



Mr. P. B. Gibble, a well known 
former student, has accepted the 
pastorate of a U. B. Church in Leba- 
noi . 

The excellent interest manifested 
the past few months still continues. 
A committee of seven has recently 
been appointed to consider ways and 
means of decorating the walls of So- 
ciety Hall with mottoes and pictures 
and to consider the design of a ban- 
ner. 



Hirsh & Bro. 

Centre Square. Next to City Hall 
LANCASTER, PA. 

Sole Agents for the Famous 
Michaels-Stern 1! e a d y-t o 
Wear Suits and Overcoats, 
Men's Furnishings and Tail- 
oring. Plain Ulotbing a 
Specialty. Strict! v one Price 
to All. 



"The House ol 
Good Clothes" 

Experience has taught us that our best 
interests will be the best interests of the 
man at the other end of the bargain. 





We sell 
Young Men's and Children' 
CLOTHING. HATS 
AND FURNISHINGS 



S. M. Myers & Co. 

12 East King Street 

LANCASTER, PENN'A 



G N. FALKENSTEIN 



The Book Store, 

Bibles, Books, g>tattoner£, post Carbs 



Mail orders receive prompt attentioi 



ELIZABETHTOWN 

ROLLER MILLS 

J. F. BINKELY, Propr. 

Manufacturer of Best Grades of 

FLOUR & FEED 

Use Binkley's Celebrated Mash Food 

It Makes Hens Lay. 
ELIZABETHTOWN, - PENNA. 



JOHN C. BARi ERIAN 

Modern Shoe Repairing 
Work guaranteed and Trices right. 

MANHEIM STREET. 



Ice Cream Confectionery, S >das of all kinds 
Mrs. S. Hornafins 1 Confectionery 



POORMAN'S BAKERY 

Choice Bread, Roll?; and Cakes. 

HUMMELSTOWN STREET 



E. H. LEHMAN 



Co 



WOOD, GRAIN 
FLOUR, FEED 



A 



SEWER PIPE, 
ETC. 

Telephoi 
ELIZABETHTOWN, PEXXA. 



L 



FURNITUER 



THE MOST COMPLETE AXD UP- 
TO-DATE L1XE IX THIS SECTIOX 
OF THE COUNTRY. 

F. C. FISHER 



ELIZABETHTOWN, 



A. W. MARTIN 

COAL, WOOD, GRAIN 
FLOUR and FEED 



ELIZABETHTOWN, - PENXA. 

S. G. HERSHEY 

Groceries, Dry 

Goods and 

Notions. 

ELIZABETHTOWN, - PENNA. 



S. P. EN6LE 



S. Market & Bainbridge Sts. 



DRY GOODS, NOTIONS, FOOT- 
WEAR, CARPETS, LINOLEUMS 
AND OIL CLOTHS. 

ELIZABETHTOWN, PA. 



Jos. D. Hollinger, 

ROOFING & SPOUTING 
HOT AIR FURNACES 



Breeder of bell 'phone 

Prize-Winning 

Light Brahmas 

Elizabethtown Pa. 



Go To 

HERR'S BOOK STORE 

112-114 N. Queen St., Lancaster, Pa. 

— for — 

BOOKS AND STATIONERY 

PENNANTS PRINTING 



Bell, 9-5. Hours 8 to G 

DR. JEROME G. HESS 

DENTIST 

Hertzler Bldg. Elizabethtown Pa. 



AMERICAN FIELD AND POULTRY 
FENCE 

JOS. H. RIDER ca, SON 



£. L. RENSEI 

General Blacksinithiiu/ 
and Repair Work 
Horse-Shoeing a Specialty. 

Park St., Elizabethtown, Pa. 



J. RALPH GROSS 
THE BARBER 

Elizabethtown, - - Prima. 



JNO. M. SHOOKERS 
WATCHMAKER AND JEWELER 

5 yrs. with L. Weber & Son 

Lancaster, Pa. 

Elizabethtown, - - Penna. 



Bell & Ind. Phones 

The Lancaster Mail Order House 

Dealers in 

New and Old Books 
East Orange St., Lancaster, Pa 



For All Kinds of 

FARMING IMPLEMENTS 

Go To 

Geise & McBride 



KLIZABETHTOYVN, 



I'K.WA. 



BISHOPS STUDIO 
Photos of All Styles. 

Framing Neatly Executed. 

Center Square, Elizabethtown, Penna. 



ELIZABETHTOWN 



Dental (parlors 



S. J. HEINDEL, Dentist. 



Up-To-Date Shoe Repairing 
We Guarantee You the Best Service 

and Materials 
S. K. Barnes & Son. South Market St. 



FIVE AND TEN CKNT STORE 

It is really wonderful what a few 
pennies will buy in our ."> and 1(1 
cent store and every article is useful 
about the cuius.- Nothing in the 
store is priced for more than 10c and 
from that down to lc. 

BLIZABE1 II lOW \. - PENNA. 



O. N. HEISEY 
Provisions, Groceries £& Choice Candies 



HEISEY HOLDING 



KIIZALKTHTOAYN, II \\ \ 



St. Patrick's Day 2 &, 3 
Cards Post for5cts. 



THE HERALD BOOK STORE 



WEST HIGH STREET 



GET MY PRICES ON 

Building Material 

PAINTS, ETC. 
before purchasing. Will be 
pleased toquoteonauything 
in the Hardware' line. Edi- 
son Phonographs, Sporting 
Goods, Kodak supplies, etc. 

GEO. A. FISHER 

ELIZABETHTOWN, - PENNA. 



/. E. BELSER 

Eor Rooling, Spouting, Tin and 
Granite Wan', Milk Cans, Radi- 
ators, Portable Furnaces, Granite 
Lisk Roasters in lour sizes, or 
any special orders in my line. 
Give me a trial. 

Opp. Exchange Bank 

EI.1ZABETHTOWN, - PENNA. 



SUBSCRIBE FOR 

OUR COLLEGE TIMES 
50c. PER YEAR 



0. .C RENSEL 

Choice Bread, Rolls 
& Cakes of All Kinds 

Prompt Delivery. 

S. Market St. 

EL1ZABETHTOWN, - PENNA. 



KUHN'S 

CHOICE BREAD AND 
CAKES 

Weddings and parties supplied 
with Fancy Cakes at short 
notice. South Market Street. 

ELIZABETHTOWN, - PENNA. 



Harry Miller 

Furniture & Undertaking 

Furniture Repairing & Upholstering 
Picture Framing 

Bell Phone 
Kliz;ihethtown, - - Penna. 



G. WM. REISNEE 

Manufacturing Jeweler, Class and 
Fraternity Pins, Pennants, Banners 

Lancaster, Penna. 



An early start, a steady pace. 
Is our way to win the race. 
We would advise those who can. 
Adopt a system, work the plan. 

methods, nowadays, 
Are commendable in many ways 

at mssi.kys 
lunch: and dining rooms 

14-16 E. Chestnut St., Lancaster, Pa. 



ELIZABETHTOWN COLLEGE FACULTY 



D. C. REBER, A. M. Pd. D., President 
Philosophy, Pedagogy, German. 

H. K. OBER, Pd. B., Vice President, 
Biological Science, Agriculture, 
Surveying. 

ELIZABETH MYER, M. E., 

Elocution and Grammer. 
B. F. WAMPLER, B. E., 

Director of Music, Voice Culture. 
FLORA GOOD WAMPLER, 

Piano, Organ, Harmony. 
J. G. MEYER, Pd. B., A. B., 

Mathematics, Physical Science, 

History. 

MARY E. MARKLEY, A. M., 

English, Latin and French. 

J. Z. HERR Prin. Commercial Dep't, 
Bookkeeping, Penmanship, Com- 
mercial Law. 



JACOB S. HARLEY, A. B., 

Geography, History and Civics 

LYDIA STAUFFER, 
English Bible. 

LEAH M. SHEAFFER, Pd. B., 

Piano, Organ, Drawing, Physi- 
cal Culture. 

R. W. SCHLOSSER, Pd. B., 
Latin and Algebra. 

ELIZABETH KLINE, 

Piano, English Branches. 

ANNA W. WOLGEMUTH, 

Shorthand and Typewriting 

DAISY P. RIDER, Pd. B., 

(Absent on Leave.) 
LAURA B. HESS, 

Sewing. 
ELD. S. H. HERTZLER, 

Exegesis (Bible Term). 



Contents 

Alumni Notes ........ 13 

College Note Book ....... 13 

Editorial 3 

Exchanges ........ 12 

Letter from Alaska ....... 5 

Letter Writing ....... 9 

Literary ......... 5 

Locals ......... 10 

March .......... 3 

1'rof. Brecbt's Appointment -....- 4 

l'rof. Brecht's Career - - - - - - 4 

Religious Appointments ...... 14 

School News ........ 10 

Society News - - . - - - - - 1 1 

The Letter Writer's Be(e) Hive ..... a 

True Rest --..-.... 5 

What Education is Not ...... 7 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



ELIZABETHOWN. PA., .MARCH, 1911. 



EDITORIAL STAFF: 



HOLMES FALKENSTEIN, As 
I.EAH M. SHEAFFER, Alumni 
B F. WALTZ, Society News 



ELIZABETH MVER, Edit 
acia'e Editor 



R. W. SCHLOSSER, Eusir 



WALTER F. ESHLEMAN, Exchanges 
MAZIE MARTIN, Locals 
GERTRUDE MILLER, Stenographer 

! Manager 



Our Collegf Times is published monthly, except in August and September. 

The paper will be sent cuntiuous'y to old subscribers, so as not to break their files, and arrearages charged, 
ess notice to discontinue has been received at expiration. 
Report changes of address, and failure to receive this paper regularly, to the Business Manager. 
Terms : Fifty cants per year, 10 cents monthly. 
Entered at the Post Office at Elizabethtown, Pa , as Second-Class Matter, April 19, 1909. 



EDITORIAL 

March ! 
MARCH — Its tree. Juniper. Its 
stone, Bloodstone. Its motto. "Cour- 
age and strength in time of danger." 
— Old Saying. 

Look and listen! All the earth is 
awakening. For this is Spring's 
resurrection, and March, with his 
dauntless courage and strength, has 
heralded its coming to the world. 
The Juniper trees are tremhling with 
happiness, and as the cool, crisp 
breath of March sways their branches 
they wave their palms of rejoicing 
and seem to say, "This is our day. 
for we belong to March! O world, 
look up to us, and be strong!" Let 
us therefore be sturdy and resolute, 
like March, and putting on our juni- 
per strength, go forth to search Cod's 
truths in all things. Let our souls 
awake, like the Spring, and seek out " 
God's glories. — Ida Scott Taylor. 



We always judge strangers by 
their manners; their dress may give 
us some idea of their worldly pos- 
sessions, but it is to their manners 
we look for good or ill breeding. 
Quietness of movement, and gentle- 
ness of speech and action, are marks 
of true refinement. Though the face 
may lack beauty, and the form sym- 
metry, if there is a grace of manner 
and charm of mind, these will atone 
for the absence of attractions that 
only please the eye and strike the 
fancy. Gracious manners may be 
cultivated to a certain extent, and 
with innate refinement, are more 
beautiful still. — Year Book of Eng- 
lish Authors. 



Our Winter terms closes March 2?, 



at 



The Spring Term opens March 2 7 
at 1 p. m. Students expecting to 
board at the College should engage 
rooms soon. Address all communi- 
cations to Dr. D. C. Reber, President. 



Evil communications corrupt good 
manners. — 1 Corinthians 15:34. 



Read the "Spring Term Announce- 
ment" as found in the February is- 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



sue of Our College Times. Those 
who are not subscribers may have a 
copy of the February number if they 
send their address on a postal card 
to Mr. R. W. Schlosser, our Business 
Manager. 

Don't forget the Anniversary of 
the dedication of our College Build- 
ings to be observed with appropriate 
exercises on March 4. Dr. D. W. 
Kurtz, pastor of the First Church of 
the Brethren of Philadelphia, will 
give the principal address on this oc- 
casion. Those of you who heard him 
at our Educational meeting held dur- 
ing the Bible Term in December, will 
want to hear him again. 

Come! Bring your friends with 
you! 

Dr. George E. Reed is about to re- 
sign his position as Presidentof Dick- 
inson College, Carlisle. What grand 
opportunities for young men of 
scholarship and sterling Christian 
character are opening up! Press on, 
young people! Positions are ready 
for you to fill, if you but meet the 
requirements. 

Mr. Joaquin Miller, the poet of 
the Sierras, was, at the time of this 
writing, lying critically ill in a hos- 
pital in Oakland, California. 

Prof. Brecht's Appointment 

The appointment by Governor Tell- 
er on Feb. T, of Prof. M. J. Brechl 
of Lancaster County as a member of 
the State Railroad Commission, 
comes as a pleasant surprise to the 
people of Lancaster County. The 
position is one of the most Import- 
ant in the gift of the Governor, the 
term being for live years and com 
manding a salarj of eight tho 
dollars. 



Prof. Brecht's long public exper- 
ience and training, although confined 
to the educational field, will no 
doubt, qualify him to fill this im- 
portant position. This appointment 
has necessitated Prof. Brecht's resig- 
nation as superintendent of the 
schools of Lancaster County. 

Dr. N. C. Sheaffer, State Superin- 
tendent of Public Instruction, on 
Feb. 15, appointed Prof. Daniel 
Fleisher. superintendent of the 
schools of Columbia, Pa., to succeed 
Prof. Brecht as County Superintend- 
ent. Mr. Fleisher will assume the 
duties of his new office on Monday, 
Feb. 20. 

During his service of twenty-sev- 
en years as County Superintendent. 
Prof. Brecht has done excellent work 
in raising the standard of the Public 
School system: and as he leaves this 
office, the friends of Elizabeth town 
College join with his many other 
friends in extending to him the hand 
of gratitude for the inspiration, and 
encouragement received while co- 
workers with him in the cause of 
education. 

Our College Times extends con- 
gratulations to Prof. Daniel Fleisher. 
of Columbia, on his being appointed 
as successor to Prof. Brecht in the 
office of County Superintendent. We 
wish Prof. Fleisher much success in 
his new field cf labor. 

Prof. Brecht's Career 

Prof. Brecht was born in Rapho 
township in 1^":.. He is a son of 
Dr. s. s. Brecht, a well-known prac- 
titioner in his community, who died 

a lew years ago. In early I 

Brei in taught in Rapho township, 

raduatlng at the Mll- 

leravllle State Normal School in 

1875. He taught tor a slion period 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



at Marietta and was then elected 
principal of the Manheim borough 
schools. He was subsequently chosen 
principal of the Soldiers' Orphans' 
School at Mt. Joy, which position he 
occupied when appointed County 
Superintendent in 18S3 to succeed 
Dr. B. F. Shaub, who resigned to be- 
come Principal of the Millersville 
State Normal School. Prof. Brecht 
has held the position of County Su- 
perintendent ever since, being suc- 
cessively re-elected without opposi- 
tion. 

Professor Brecht has figured some- 
what in politics. He was a candidate 
for Congress at the primary in 1901 
to succeed Marriott Brosius, but was 
defeated by H. Burd Cassel, in a 
comparatively close fight. He was 
again a candidate for Congress at 
the general election in 1904, but was 
again defeated by Mr. Cassel. 

Tt is with deep regret that we note 
the death of a patron and financial 
contributor to our school, Joseph M. 
Merkey of Bethel, Berks Co., Pa., . 
grandfather of Howard Merkey, who 
has been a student here, and is now 
teaching school in Rapho township. 
Lancaster County. The funeral was 
held Feb. 15. We extend our sym- 
pathy to the bereaved family. 



LITERARY 



I test 



Rest is not quitting 

The busy career; 
Rest is the fitting 

Of self to one's sphere. 

Tis the brook's motion, 

Clear without strife. 
Fleeting to ocean. 

After this life. — Goethe 



Letter From Alaska. 

Continued from February Issue. 

I am here to help the natives in 
any and every way that I can, no 
matter what that help may be; so 
it is plainly seen that the govern- 
ment teacher in Alaska is given the 
greatest liberty in his work. If he 
thinks it necessary to visit a fam- 
ily in distress far out on the hills, 
he goes. As there is no physician 
within our reach I am given quite 
a supply of drugs and medicines with 
instructions that are not too techni- 
cal for a novice to understand. I am 
also responsible to a certain extent 
for the hygienic and sanitary condi- 
tions of the village. It has lately 
become my duty to plead the cause 
of two Indians who bring suit against 
a white man. J have found a friend 
in the Marshal of my district who 
is a great help to me in cases of this 
kind. 

After the coldest part of the winter 
is past, the natives will all go hunting 
for big game, and will camp on the 
hills for a month or more. All this 
is very interesting to me. 

I would, however, have no one 
think that all my work is pleasant 
because that would hardly be the 
truth. The wicked white man has 
demoralized these natives and has in- 
duced them to drop many of their 
native customs and to try to adopt 
his own. This has resulted in noth- 
ing more than in giving them a sort 
of veneer of civilization. 

The natives judge me and my read- 
ers to be men of no higher standard 
of life than those who have been the 
cause of their fall from the simple 
native life to a semi-civilization with 
all its debauchery. How can they 
judge otherwise when they see so 
few examples of anything better? 
This makes my work hard indeed. 
The white man takes advantage of 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



the natives when ever he can, and evi- 
dently does not appreciate the ef- 
forts of the Bureau which is trying 
to uplift them in their own natural 
life. In corresponding with other 
posts I And that each camp has its 
own peculiar difficulties. My great 
problem so far has been to protect 
the natives from the traps and wick- 
edness of the whites, and although 
my predecessor was driven from this 
camp, I believe I am in no danger, 
because these lawless people realize 
that I have the Marshal, the law, 
and handcuffs for my protection. I 
am continually advised by my super- 
iors to go far out of my way in order 
to avoid unnecessary trouble, but to 
take a stand and hold it when duty 
and principle are involved. 

During February I expect to make 
a trip of about two weeks with dogs 
and compass, in the direction of 
Mackenzie Bay, to the Porcupine 
Indians. The greatest danger in 
these trips is perhaps not the cold, 
for it is possible to protect one's self 
with the right kind of skins, but 
rather the possibility of getting lost 
in the blinding snow storms; for, al- 
though the country south and west 
of us is mountainous, the north is a 
great tundra with no land marks to 
guide the "musher." Along the well 
established mail routes there are 
road-houses where the carriers stop. 
A good dog team will travel from for- 
ty to fifty miles without a stop on a 
good trail. 

We have in this camp two dogs 
that are almost worshipped because 
on two different occasions they Bayed 
the life of their master with almost 
more than human intelligence, after 
he had quite given up all hope. I 
have listened to many a chilling story 
of wonderful endurance. 

In another letter I should like to 
give some details of sonic of my trips, 



of some problems of discipline, and of 
the very interesting characteristics 
of the Indian. 

This work is most interesting and 
fascinating. I consider the exper- 
ience of inestimable value to any one. 
The field is a rich one but I would 
advise no one to enter the service 
who is not at least in sympathy with 
the life of a missionary. I shall al- 
ways remember my stay at Circle, 
and these people with much pleasure; 
and if I can do an errand for any one 
of my friends in this great North- 
West Wonderland, it will give me 
great delight; and as my associates 
here are few, I have no greater joy 
than hearing from my acquaintances 
back east. In conrlusion I quote the 
lines of another who expresses my 
feelings exactly. 

"There's a land where the mountains 
are nameless. 
And the rivers all run Gol knows 
where; 
There are lives tlat are erring and 
aimless, 
And deaths that just hang by a 
hair. 
Yes! there's the lar.d, (Have you seen 
it?) 
It's the cussedest land that I know. 
From the big dizzy mountains that 
screen it 
To the deep deathlike valleys be- 
low. 
It's the great big broad land way up 
yonder. 
It's the forests where silence has 
lease; 
It's the beauty tlat thrills me with 
wonder. 
It's the silence that fills me with 
peace. 
Some say Ood was tired when He 
made it; 
Some say it's a good land to shun: 
May be; but there's some as would 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



trade it 
For no land on earth, and I'm 
one. 
The summer — no sweeter was ever; 

The sunshiny woods all athrill; 
The grayling aleap in the river. 

The bighorn asleep on the hill. 
The strong life that never knows 
harness; 
The wilds where the caribou call; 
The freshness, the freedom, the far- 
ness — 
O God! I'm in love with it all. 

W. K. GISH. 

What Education is Not 

(By Jacob E. Myers.) 
When we venture upon this sub- 
ject of so great importance in the 
educational world, we find a number 
of things which education is not. 

Education is not a gift that can 
be bestowed upon any one. It is not 
the transmission of power from the 
teacher to the student. It is not a 
divine gift of content from the teach- 
er, but a human, hard-earned victory 
for the student. Education is not a 
jacknife which can be presented, it 
is an intellectual pilgrimage for the 
student. The teacher is not a 
"pony," but a co-laborer, co-worker, 
or an experienced companion for the 
pupil. 

Education is not a preparation for 
ease or idleness. It cannot be ac- 
quired without pains and application. 
It is troublesome and deep digging 
for pure water, but when you reach 
the springs they rise up to meet you. 
As every grain helps to fill the bushel 
so every cell developed in the brain 
helps to make the man. Education 
cultivates the habit of work. The 
truly educated mind has accustomed 
itself to the performance of tasks 
which are now done easily. 



Education is not a disadvantage. 
Manufacturers find intelligent me- 
chanics more profitable to employ, 
even at higher wages, than those 
who are uneducated. I have never 
heard of any one who has had much 
experience in employing large num- 
bers of men, who held a contrary 
view; and, as a general rule, those 
manufacturers are most successful 
who are most careful to secure in- 
telligent and skillful workmen. The 
mind that has been trained wastes 
no time in planning nor does it waste 
material. It quickly discloses itself 
in a certain skill of execution, a cer- 
tain air of mastery, a certain man- 
ner of self-confidence, and especially 
a certain pleasure in performance. 

Education is not a collegiate di- 
ploma hanging upon the wall. Too 
many may have a false notion or 
concept of this kind of training. 
That diploma is not your education. 
A young lady who had graduated 
from a certain school, after she came 
home, placed her diploma upon the 
wall and said, "There is all I know." 
The diploma does not mean that you 
have passed through the College, but 
that the College has passed through 
joii — as some one has expressed it. 

Education is not impression, but 
expression; not receptivity but activ- 
ity. What the teacher (usually) 
gives the pupils, they forget; but 
what they give the teacher, is usual- 
ly what they retain. The mind is 
developed not by receiving know- 
ledge but by winnowing and express- 
ing it. 

Education is not knowledge but 
power. A man cannot know every- 
thing but he can know something of 
everything and know it well. He is 
aware of his strength and weakness 
and is content to work within his 
limitations. With this self-know- 



s 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



ledge, he is able to direct his energy 
and efforts toward his special capa- 
city. He has found his true calling. 
He, then, has ability and power to 
do something well. Daniel Webster 
says, "Knowledge does not comprise 
all which is contained in the large 
term of education. The feelings are 
to be disciplined, the passions are 
to be restrained: true and worthy 
motives are to be inspired: a pro- 
found religious feeling is to be in- 
stilled, and pure morality inculcated 
under all circumstances. All this is 
comprised in education." 

From this we at once infer that 
education is not complete unless the 
mind's processes of knowing, feeling, 
and willing, are developed. One 
must study sciences for the develop- 
ment of the intellect, arts for the 
emotion or feelings, and volition for 
the will. Considering the abject of 
these mental activities we clea 
that without the development of 
these three, education is unbalanced. 
The mind through the study of 
science knows truth and avoids er- 
ror, through the study of arts it feels 
as its highest beauty, and avoids ug- 
liness; and through the study of vo- 
litions it wills goodness and avoids 
evil. 

Education is not utlltarian. It is 
not primarily fitting one to do some- 
thing, but to be something. Tin' 
idea of being is more compre 
than the idea of doing. On.' mi 
be something before he can do some- 
thing. Some one has said. "Out of 
the fount of bei stream 

of achievement." It is more servi- 
ceable to learn to do by knowing. One 
must travel the road o) 
ment and see the visions o 
before he can fully enter D] 
self devotions ol 

im in at ion is not slavery. 



ucated man is not handicapped. The 
bond of ignorance is broken, the sla- 
very of fear is abolished, and tho 
subjection of superstition is re- 
moved. He discovers his individual- 
ity, bis personal powers are set free, 
and his human outlook is broad and 
wide. The man who is free from 
slavery makes himself the measure 
of the universe, the other makes the 
universe the measure of himself. 

Education is not passing through 
only one of the three stages Of 
thought. The lowest stage supposes 
that its objects are all independent 
of another. Each thing is self-exist- 
ent and a solid reality. It supposes 
that things are the essential ele- 
ments of all bein". It is the view 
of the atheist. r .he second is the 
stage of understanding. It knows 
better what is essential; it regards 
relations as essential. Each thing 
is related to everv other. This is 
the view of the pantheist. The third 
is the stage of reason. Reason sees 
the disjunctive sylloquism. Chris- 
tianity is largely a religion of the 
reason. Some people never go be- 
yond the first, others never beyond 
e go through all 
When they arrive in the third 
i is aboi e time 
and spare, back of all. One who is 
in the third stage has a comp 
sive view of all three and has real 
education. 

The Letter Writor'8 Be(e) Hive 

1, Be sensible enougb to select 
good 11 iper — pens — ink 

2. Be neat and exact in the me- 

ntion of youi 
-hip. position of parts, capi- 
talization, punctuation, abbreviation 
i Ion, 
watchful as to your gram- 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



I. Be correct as to your spelling. 
5. Be worth while in your thought. 
G. Be proper and consistent in be- 
ginning and concluding your letter. 

7. Be careful to fold neatly and 
properly. 

8. Be painstaking enough to read 
over your letters before sealing 
them. 

9. Be certain to seal your letters. 

10. Be cautious to direct fully and 
carefully. 

II. Be sure to stamp your letters. 

12. Be familiar with the postal 
laws. 

13. Be prompt in mailing your 
letters. 

14. Be courteous enough to en- 
close a stamp, if circumstances re- 
quire. 

15. Be business like in business 
letters and friendly in friendly let- 
ters. 

1C. Be ratural in style. 

17. Be absolutely truthful. 

IS. Be wise enough to avoid 
writing a letter when strongly excit- 
ed. 

19. Be particular to keep copies 
of important letters. 

20. Be informed as to different 
types of letters and notes. 

— Francis Harvey Green 

Letter Writing 

Dear Editor. — I have been wanting 
for sometime to discuss the subject 
of Letter Writing with the friends of 
# Our College Times, so I come to you 
now with my first chapter. I shall 
discuss the subject according to the 
arrangement of topics in Prof 
Green's Be(e) Hive on Letter Writ- 
ing, which you will find above. 

In writing letters all should "Be 
sensible enough to select good ma- 
terials." You inn scarcely realize. 



perhaps, how much a writer's taste 
is judged by the kind of paper and 
ink he uses. 

There is no excuse for a gentle- 
man to write a note to a lady on 
ordinary tablet paper, since there are 
so many grades of stationery on the 
market sold at very low prices. It is 
well also to remember that a message 
to a friend is intended only for her, 
hence it should not be enclosed in an 
envelpope so thin or transparent as 
to satisfy the noy creatures who de- 
lig'.-t in looking into other men's 
matters. 

The ink of course should always 
be the best black ink. or fluid, which 
when first applied to paper appears 
green but afterward turns black. 

Secohd, we should "Be(e) neat 
and e; act in the mechanical execu- 
tion of our letters." Generally 
speaking, the penmanship of a letter 
should be a neat, plain, legible hand. 
Most cultured persons will agree 
that many fancy fandangles or flour- 
ishes are not in good taste, unless 
used by a person skilled in the art 
of ornamental penmanship. The 
lorm of a letter, the capitalization, 
punctuaticn, knowledge, of abrevia- 
tion and syllabification, — all are of 
the utmost importance. — 1 will tell you 
more abo-.it this subject in the next 
chapter. ANNA JUNSON. 

The latest message from Miss Jen- 
nie Miller, Hebron Seminary, Nokes- 
ville. Va., says, "We are preparing to 
give a musical at the end of the term, 
partly an Easter program. I have 
some pretty fine piano and-voice stu- 
dents. Remember me to the girls 
at the College." 

Good qualities are the substantial 

riches of the mind; but it is good 

breeding that sets them off to ad- 
vantage. — Locke. 



10 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



SCHOOL NEWS 

Locals 

The Mennonites held revival meet- 
ings in their church in Elizabeth- 
town several weeks in February, 
which resulted in sixty-nine converts, 

Mrs. Sara Royer of Richland, sister 
of the late Eld. William Hertzler was 
laid to rest Feb. 1st. She was the 
grandmother of Prof. J. G. Myer's 
wife and aunt to Eld. S. H. Hertz- 
ler, both of whom attended the fun- 
eral. 

Dr. and Mrs. D. C. Reber, Mrs. 
Augusta Reber and son Joshua, at- 
tended the funeral of William Reber 
on Feb. 18th, at Centreport, Berks 
County, Pa. He was the son of Jon- 
athan Reber, and just twenty-eight 
years old. He leaves a wife and, 
one child. 

Our sympathy goes out to these 
sorrowing friends. 

We were sorry to have Miss Anna 
Manning give up her work at the 
College; yet we admire the young 
lady or gentleman who is dutiful to 
loved ones in the home. 

Some very interesting games of 
basket ball have been played recent- 
ly, between day students and board- 
ing students, and between seniors 
and undergraduates. 

The preaching services in town 
conducted by Prof. H. K. Ober were 
participated in by the students and 
teachers with so much interest that 
the Keystone Literary Society post- 
poned its Feb. 24th program until 
Mar. 3rd. 

Miss Hettie Stauffer, who spent 
some time in Ephrata and Lancaster 
teaching Bible classes and giving 
talks on her wonderful experiences 
while on her trip to Palestine, left 
the College on Feb. 21, for her home 
in Ohio. 



Spring Term plans are already be- 
ing made by students here, as well 
as by others who are coming to join 
us. 

The "University of Adversity" af- 
fords a valuable training, according 
to the spicy lecture delivered on 
Thursday, Feb. 9, by Dr. Roselle, pas- 
tor of the First Baptist Church, of 
Philadelphia. 

Saturday evening, Feb. 11, all 
were delightfully surprised by the 
return of Miss Mary Hershey of Lit- 
itz. She had been compelled to 
leave College on account of sickness 
at home. 

Feb. 10, Mr. V. C. Finnel gave an 
interesting talk on the Brethren Pub- 
lishing House and its interests. He 
even acted as guide and free of 
charge took us in imagination 
through all the departments of the 
Publishing House, explaining the 
work in each and introducing us to 
the chief managers. We felt like 
shaking hands with Mr. Warren Zieg- 
ler and Miss Lavina Andes as we en- 
tered their departments. 

Mrs. L. D. Rose recently spent a 
day in Philadelphia. 

Jan. 29, Mrs. J. H. McKelvey was 
a guest of Miss Markley. 

Miss Lydia Stauffer acocmpanied 
her sister Miss Hettie Stauffer on a 
short visit to friends at Earlville. 

Prof. Ober preached a series of 
meetings lasting from Feb. 3 to Feb. 
10, at l.ititz. and is at present con- 
ducting a series in Elizabethtown. 

Feb. 1. Miss Meyer visited in the 
home of Miss Ada Brandt. 

Miss Markley recently spent two 
successive Saturdays and Sundays in 
Philadelphia, 

Feb. 4 and 5, Miss Elma Brandt 
visited her former room-mate. Miss 
Sarah Wenger, who Is at present at- 
tending the Messiah Bible School at 



OUR COLLEGE TIMKS 



11 



Harrisburg. 

Eld. Levi Mohler gave a short talk 
during Chapel exercises on Friday, 
Feb. 3. 

"Table Etiquette" was the subject 
of a most excellent paper given in 
Chapel by Miss Markley, Jan. 25. 

.Miss Rhoda Miller and Mr. Andrew 
Henry have recently been baptized. 
Misses Carrie Dennis and Irene Wise 
have also decided for Christ and the 
Church. 

The prophecy hinted at in the Feb- 
ruary College note book was scarcely 
written until it was fulfilled by the 
appearance of our former janitor, 
Mr. S. M. Ziegler, who spent a few 
days visiting friends at the College. 

The follows? have been 'recent 
visitors at the College: — Miss Sarah 
Wenger from the Messiah Bible 
School, Harrisburg; Miss Stella 
Frantz, a former student, now teach- 
ing at Ronks; Miss Sadie Myer, of 
Bareville and her nephew, Master 
Samuel Myer: Levi Ziegler of Ridg- 
ley, Md.; Florence Miller and Nora 
Martin of Ephrata: Misses Cora Par- 
mer and Raberta Gedola and Mr. 
Xoah Parmer of New Holland; Miss. 
Emma Weaver of Brownstown; Mr. 
Samuel Hess of Rothsville; Misses 
Sadie Carper and Violet Hoffer of 
Palmyra and Anna Longenecker of 
Annville. 

Society Notes. 

A Trip to Mars was the subject of 
a number of papers read in Society, 
Feb. 3. The program, interspersed 
with music, was as follows: The 
Preparation, Pierce Edris; Farewell 
Address, Albert Reber; The Journey, 
Orville Becker: Arrival and Recep- 
tion, Mamie Keller; An Account of 
the Experiences on Mar?. Xora Reb- 
er: Return. Maude Hertzler. A trip 
of this kind appeals powerfully to 



the imagination. It supplants the 
fairy tales that have been heard in 
childhood. The novel now holds 

sway with adults, and that is the 
main method by which people exer- 
cise their imagination. 

Mr. Joshua Reber has been ap- 
pointed to collect the names of the 
members of the Society from its 
founding to the present time, and 
arrange them in a loose leaf ledger. 

As Congreve says, "Music hath 
charms to soothe a savage breast, 
To soften rocks, or bend a knotted 
oak," The Keystone Literary So- 
ciety has valued music very highly. 
The "Overture to Oberon" by Weber, 
and "Valse" by Durand were given 
as piano duets by Mrs. Wampler and 
Miss Sheaffer. Aristotle well says: 
"Music is education, amusement and, 
enjoyment. Rhythm and melody 
supply imitations of anger and gen- 
tleness, and also of courage and tem- 
perance and of virtues and vices in 
general, which hardly fall short of 
the actual affections, as we know 
from our own experience, for in list- 
ening to such strains our souls un- 
dergo a change." Surely such a man 
who lias music in himself, and is 
moved by the concord of sweet 
sounds, may be trusted. 

The committee appointed to ar- 
range the Society Hall anew, are 
working very hard. They have giv- 
en the hall one coating of paint. Dr. 
McCaskey, ex-Mayor of Lancaster, 
has offered the Society any of the 
pictures he has in his art series for 
our walls. 

Some of the questions debated are: 
Resolved, That a law creating a per- 
manent tariff commission should be 
enacted. Resolved, That the Pana- 
ma Canal should be fortified. 

The new officers of the Society 
are: Pres., Walter Eshleman; Vice 



n 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



Pres., William Kulp; Sec, Elmira 
Parmer; Editor, Mabel Weaver; Crit- 
ic, R. W. Schlosser. 

"The Philippine Islands" was the 
subject of an illustrated lecture giv- 
en by Prof. Meyer on Feb. 

B. F. W. 

Exchanges. 

The Philomathean Monthly for 
January seems historically inclinel 
as several essays of a historical char- 
acter occur in that issue. The value 
of these writings cannot be over es- 
timated to the industrious student. 
Do not neglect to read the definition 
of "The True Gentleman." 

"Our Heritage and Our Debt to the 
Future," and "What America owes 
to Women" deserve prominent plac- 
es in the Red and Black. The Liter- 
ary department of this paper is ex- 
ceptionally strong when you consider 
that it is edited by a high school or- 
ganization. 

The Editor-in-Chief of College 
Rays is not only able to use the quill 
in the editorial column, but is also 
capable of using it in the artistic 
productions of penmanship. 

We do not approve of the immoral 
language used in one of the stories 
of Purple and White. Although such 
expressions are familiar to the col- 
lege student, yet it is not advisable 
to put them in print. 

"Lincoln, the Orator" in Albright 
Bulletin attributes much of the suc- 
cess of this philanthropist to his pow- 
er of speech, and his ability to enter- 
tain an audience. 

Did you ever hear of a College 
being beaten G9-6 in a game of bas- 
ket ball? Consult the Rays of Light 
and see what was wrong with Mc 
Pherson. 

"Every Institution during its pro- 
gress passes through a period in its 



history in which it makes some great 

forward step. In such a time it 

more than merely keeps pace with 

rapid-striding progress. But such 

advancement does not come forward 

of itself. There is an effort behind 

it, which makes conditions ripe for 

it. These conditions can be brought 

out in the school only through the 

loyal spirit of its students. For it 

is the loyalty of the students which 

makes the school." — Red and Black. 

"There's metres of wood. 

And metres of stone. 

But the best of all metres 

Is to meet her alone." — Ex. 

Customer — "Have you any fly 
paper?" 

Clerk — "Yes, sir. Will you have 
the Aeroplane Journal or the Avia- 
tor's Gazette." — Ex. 
"All the people dead who wrote it, 
All the people dead who spoke it, 
All the people die who learn it. 
Blessed death! they surely earn it. 
— Latin." — Ex. 

"Let us then, as young men, obey 
the laws governing a successful life: 
use and not abuse our abilities; and 
always stand for truth and right, so 
that when the great Creator and 
Master calls us from the toils of this 
life, we can look back over our past 
career and say, "I have lived a suc- 
cessful life." " — College Campus. 

"He was very bashful and she tried 
to make it easy for him. They were 
driving along the seashore and she 
became silent [or a moment. "What's 
the matter," he asked. "Oh! I feel 
blue," he said, "nobody loves me 
and my hands are cold." "You 
should not spy that," was his word of 
consolation, "for God loves you. your 
mother loves you and you can sit on 
your hands." " — Ex. 

"There is no real achievement 
without sacrifice; neither is there 



OUE COLLEGE TIMES 



13 



real progress without opposition. 
Looking back over all past ages, "we 
see this to be true. There was no 
great accomplishment except through 
opposition and sacrifice. Opposition 
then, is one of the elements in pro- 
gress. If man wavers or is allowed 
to be shifted about by every gust of 
wind, the principles he advocates 
will soon come to naught." 

— College Campus. 
The following exchanges have been 
received: Juniata Echo, Rays of 
Light, Friendship Banner, Red and 
Black, Philomathean Monthly, Pur- 
ple and White, Lordsburg College 
Educator, and Purple and Gold for 
January: Albright Bulletin, College 
Campus, Hebron Star, College Rays, 
Ursinus Weekly, and Linden Hall 
Echo for February. — W. F. E. 

Alumni Notes 

Miss Daisy Rider has recently 
changed her address to 122 Lambert 
Street. She is now only seven 
squares from the Academy of Fine 
Arts. 

Iscac Z. Hackman now holds a po- 
sition in the Philadelphia Business 
School, which pays him $100 a 
month. He visited the college sev- 
eral weeks ago. 

On Jan. 27, Mr. Elmer Ruhl re- 
signed his position as principal of 
the Landisville High School, to take 
up work at the University of Penn- 
sylvania Elizabethtown students 
are aspiring to high ideals. 

Miss Florence Miller visited her 
sister Gertrude on Sunday, Feb. 12. 
We are always glad to receive visits 
from our Alumni. 

On Feb. 9. Miss Eetella V. Frantz 
attended the lecture niven in the 
College Chapel by D-. Rochelle. 

Jos. U. Frantz, wl o is attending 
school here was absent several days 



last week, on a trip to Philadelphia 
in quest of a position. 

A letter to a friend in Pa., says 
that Amos P. Geib has recently been 
installed to the ministry in Brook- 
lyn, X. .Y. We feel sure that he 
has the good wishes of all the mem- 
bers of the Alumni Association. 

News from Mr. Amos Hottenstein 
concerning the Alumni fund was re- 
ceived recently. This shows that 
somebody is busy. Let the good 
work continue. A report from the 
treasurer, once in awhile would be 
appreciated. L. M. S. 

College Note Book. 

The friends of Miss Flora Yoder, 
of Port Royal, Juniata County, Pa., 
will be interested to learn that on 
Dee. 29, she was united in marirage 
with Mr. Millard Mumma, who lives 
in the vicinity of Elizabethtown. 
Miss Yoder, who was assistant cook- 
in our culinary department a few 
years ago, now has her home at J. 
B. Aldinger's near Elizabethtown. 

A recent letter from New York 
City says that Garry R. Myers and 
Amos P. Geib ('09) have been in- 
stalled into the ministry at the 
Brooklyn Church. We extend to 
these young friends the hand of 
friendship and Christian greeting 
and hope that they may accomplish 
much good in the Master's service. 

Though many homes have been re- 
cently visited and made sad by the 
Angel of Death, still there are others 
whose thresholds were crossed and 
brightened by the Angel of Life. 
The latter Angel bore on St. Valen- 
tine's day to the home of John and 
Amelia Eby Miller at Lititz, a little 
girl who is now known as Grace 
Elizabeth Miller. When but six days 
old she sent her compliments to the 
EditoMn-Chief in the form of a 
beautiful calendar. 



Religious Appointments 

Regular Preaching Services: — 

Jan. 3 0th, S p. m. — Sermon by 
Eld. S. H. Hertzler. Subject- 
Missionary Sermon. 
Feb. 5, 10 a. m. — Sermon by Eld. 
S. R. Zug. Text, 2 Peter 3:7. 
Subject — "Preparation for Ser- 
vice." 
Christian Workers' Meeting: — 

Jan. 30, 7 p. m. — Missionary Pro- 
gramme. Biographical Sketches 
from "Modern Apostles from 
Missionary Byways." 
Mid-Week Prayer Meeting: — 
Jan. 28— Led by W. K. Kulp. 
Feb. 2 — Lei by R. W. Schlosser. 
Feb. 9 — Led by Mary Sheaffer. 
Feb. 1G — Led by Gertrude Hess. 
Sunday Bible Classes: — 

Every Sunday at 8.15 a. m. In- 
ternational S. ?. Lesson taught 
by Prof. Meyer and Miss Stauf- 
fer. 
Missionary Reading Circle: — 

Every Saturday evening at G.30. 
President — B. F. Waltz. 
Teacher — Miss Stauffer. 
Reading — "The Healing or the 
Nations." 



A complimentary copy of the Feb- 
ruary College Times sent to a form- 
er student brought this reply: 
"Many thanks for the College Times. 
I enjoyed* it very much — sat right 
down and read the whole business 
as soon as it came." 



Hirsh & Bro. 

Centre Square. Next to City Hall 
LANCASTER, PA. 



Sole Agents for the Famous 
Michaels-Stern Keady-to 
Wear Suits and Oven-oats, 
Men's Furnishings and Tail- 
oring. Plain Clothing a 
Spscialtv. Strictly one Price 
to All. 



"The House ol 
Good Clothes" 

Experience has taught us that our best 
interests will be the best interests of the 
man at the other end of the bargain. 




We sell 

Men's. Yonng Men's and Children's 

CLOTHING. HATS 

AND FURNISHINGS 



S. M. Myers & Co. 

12 East King Street 

LANCASTER, PENN'A 



Jos. D. Hollinger, 

ROOFING & SPOUTING 
HOT AIR FURNACES 



1.L THOSE 



Breeder of 

Prize-Winning 

Light Brahmas 

Elizabethtown, Pa. 



Go To 
HERB'S BOOK STORE 

112-114 N. Queen St., Lancaster, Pa. 

— for — 

BOOKS AND STATIONERY 

PENNANTS PRINTING 



Bell, 9-5. Hours S to G 

BR. JEROME G. HESS 

DENTIST 

Hertzler Bldg. Elizabethtown Pa. 



AMERICAN FIELD AND POULTRY- 
FENCE 

JOS. H. RIDER c& SON 



£. L. RENSEL 

General Blacksinithinj? 
and Repair Work 
Horse-Shoeing a Specialty. 

Park St., Elizabethtown, P 



J. RALPH GROSS 
THE BARBER 
Elizabethtown, - - Peni 



JNO. M. SHOOKERS 
WATCHMAKER AND JEWELER 

5 yrs. with L. Wrbor & Son 

Lancaster, Pa. 

Elizabethtown, - - Penna. 



Bell & Ind. Phones 
The Lancaster Mail Order House 



New and Old Books 

East Orange St., Lancaster, Pa 



For All Kinds of 

FARMING IMPLEMENTS 

Go To 

Geise & McBride 

ELIZABETHTOWN, . - PENNA. 



BISHOP'S STUDIO 
Photos of AH Styles. 

Framing Neatly Executed. 

Center Square, Elizabethtown, Penna. 



ELIZABETHTOWN 



Dental parlors 



S. J. HETNDEL, Dentist. 





Up-To-Date Shoe Repairing 


w 


e Guarantee You the Best Service 




and Materials 


8. 


K. Barnes & Son, South Market St. 



FIVE AND TEN CENT STORE 

It is really wonderful what a few 
pennies will buy in our 5 and 10 
cent store and every article is useful 
about the house. Nothing in the 
store is priced for more than 10c and 
from that down to lc. 
ELIZABETHTOWN, - PENNA. 



O. N. HBISEY 

Provisions, Groceries C& Choice Candies 



HBISEY BUILDING 



ELIZABETHTOWN, PENNA. 



rh© Book Store, ° n. falkenstein 
Bibles, Books, ^tationci^, post Caros 



M il (iiiltrs receive prompt attent 



ELIZABETH TOWS 

ROLLER MILLS 

J. P. BIXKELY, I*iopr. 
Manufacturer of Ee:t Grades of 

FLOUR & FEED 

Use Binkley's Celebrated Mash Food 

It Makes Hens Lay. 
ELIZABETHTOWN, - -PENNA. 



JOHN C. BARKERIAN 

Modern Sh..e Repairing 
Work guaranteed and Prii es right. 

VIANHEIM STH 



Mrs. S. Hornafius' Confectionery 



POORMAN'S BAKERY 

Choice Bread, Rolls and Cakes. 

HUMMELSTOWN STREET 



E. H. LEHMAN 



Co 



WOOD. GKA1X 
FLOUR, FEED 



A 



SEWER PIPE, 
ETC. 

Telephone 
EI.IZAHETHTowx. PENNA. 



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FURNITURE 



THE MOST COMPLETE AXD UP- 
TO-DATE LINE IX THIS SECTION 
OF THE COUNTRY. 

F. C. FISHER 



ELIZABETHTOWN, 



A. W. MARTIN 

COAL, WOOD, GRAIN 
FLOUR and FEED 

Telephone 
ELIZABETHTOWN, - PENNA. 

S. G HERSHEY 

Groceries, Dry 

Goods and 

Notions. 

ELIZABETHTOWN, - PENS \ 



Sn runi r dry goods, notions, foot- 
Id lNuLl wear, carpets, linoleums 



AND OIL CLOTHS. 



S. Market 6c. Bainbridge Sts. 



ELIZABETHTOWN. PA. 



See Our Grand Display of 

Easter Post Cards and Booklets 



THE HERALD BOOK STORE 



WEST HIGH STREET 



GET MY PRICES ON 

Building Material 

PAINTS, ETC. 
before purchasing. Will be 
pleased to quote on anything 
in the Hardware line. Edi- 
son Phonographs, Sporting 
Goods, Kodak supplies, etc. 

GEO. A. FISHER 

ELIZABETHTOWN, - PEXXA. 



/. E. BELSER 

Eor Rooting, Spouting, Tin and 
Granite Ware, .Milk Cans, Radi- 
ators, Portable Furnaces, Granite 
Lisk Roasters in four sizes, or 
anv special orders in my line. 
Give me a trial. 

Opp. Exchange Bank 

ELIZABETHTOWX. - PEXXA. 



SUBSCRIBE FOR 

OUR COLLEGE TIMES 
50c. PER YEAR 

0. C RENSEL 

Choice Bread, Rolls 
& Cakes of All Kinds 

Prompt Delivery. 

S. Market St. 

ELIZABETHTOWN, - PEXXA. 



KUHN'S 

CHOICE BREAD AND 
CAKES 

Weddings and parties supplied \ 
with Fancy Cakes at short 
notice. South Market Street. 

ELIZABETHTOWN, - PEXXA. 



Harry Miller 

Furniture & Undertaking 

Furniture Repairing & Upholstering 
Picture Framing 

Bell Phone 
Elizabethtpwn, - - Penna. 



G. WM. BEISNER 

Manufacturing Jeweler, Class and 
Fraternity Pins, Pennants, Banners 



Lancaster, 



Penna. 



An early start, a steady pace, 

Is our way to win the race. 

We would advise those who can, 

Adopt a system, work the plan. ] 

Modem methods, nowadays. 
Arc commendable in many ways 

AT XISSLEY'S 
LUNCH AND DINING ROOMS 

14-16 E. Chestnut St., Lancaster, Pa. 



ELIZABETHTOWN COLLEGE FACULTY 



D. C. REBER, A. M. Pd. D., President 
Philosophy, Pedagogy, German. 

H. K. OBER, Pd. B., Vice President, 

Biological Science, Agriculture, 

Surveying. 
ELIZABETH MYER, M. E., 

Elocution and Grammer. 
B. P. WAMPLER, B. E., 

Director of Music, Voice Culture. 
FLORA GOOD WAMPLER, 

Piano, Organ, Harmony. 
J. G. MEYER, Pd. B., A. B., 

Mathematics, Physical Science, 

History. 

MARY E. MARKLEY, A. M., 

English, Latin and French. 

J. Z. HERR Prin. Commercial Dep't, 
Bookkeeping, Penmanship, Com- 
mercial Law. 



JACOB S. HARLEY, A. B., 

Geography, History and Civics 

LYDIA STAUFFER, 
English Bible. 

LEAH M. SHEAFFER, Pd. B., 

Piano, Organ, Drawing, Physi- 
cal Culture. 

R. W. SCHLOSSER, Pd. B., 

Latin and Algebra. 
ELIZABETH KLIXE, 

Piano, English Branches. 
ANNA W. WOLGEMUTH, 

Shorthand and Typewriting. 
DAISY P. RIDER, Pd. B., 

(Absent on Leave.) 
LAURA B. HESS, 

Sewing. 
ELD. S. H. HERTZLER, 

Exegesis (Bible Term). 



Contents 

Alumni Notes ........ 12 

College Note Book ....... 12 

Editorial ......... 3 

Exchanges ........ 13 

Happy Spring-Time ....... 3 

Ideals & 9 

Literary ......... 6 

Locals - - - - - - - - - 11 

Milton as a Dramatist ....... u 

Religious Appointments ...... n 

School News - - - - • - - - 11 

Senior Class- l'Jll ....... 13 

Summer Term at Klizabethtowii College • - - - - 4 

Tenth Anniversar> - - - - - - - 11 

The I.orimer Case ........ 4 

The Passing of the Queue ...... 3 

Woman Suffrage ........ 3 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



ELIZABETHTOWN, PA., APRIL, 1911. No. 7 

EDITORIAJL STAFF : 

ELIZABETH MYER, Editor-in-Chief 
sociate Editor WALTER F. ESHLEMAN, Exchange! 

News MAZIE MARTIN, Locals 

GERTRUDE MILLER, Stenographer 
R. W. SCHLOSSER, Business Manager 



HOLMES FALKENSTEIN, 
LEAH M. SHEAFFER, Alur 
B. F. WALTZ, Society News 



Report changes of address, and failure t< 
Terms : Fifty cents per year, 10 cents n 
Entered at the Post Office at Elizabethtc 



eive this paper regularly, to the Business Mai 
nly. 
Pa., as Second-Class Matter. April 19, 1909. 



EDITORIAL 

Happy Spring-time! 

Oltl Time hath laid his mantle by 
Of wind and rain and icy chill. 

And dons a rich embroidery 

Of sunlight poured on lake and 
hill. 

Xo beast or bird in earth or sky. 
Whose voice does not with glad- 
ness thrill. 
For Time hath laid his mantle by 
Of rain and wind and icy chill. 

— Charles of Orleans. 



We have longed and waited for the 
Spring. Behold how gently and 
blithely she comes! Silently her 
glad feet come tripping over the 
hills, and each day she has a sweet 
surprise in store for ns. 

The increasing greenness of the 
grass, the red blossoms of the maples. 
the catkins, the pussy willows with 
their soft and downy buds, the arbu- 
tus and violets with their sweet fra- 
grance, the call of the robin, and the 
song-sparrow's cheerful music — all 



these fill us with gladness and teach 
us beautiful lessons of the resurrec- 
tion. 

Woman Suffrage 

The hearing held in Harrisburg 
on March 14, before committees of 
the State Legislature on the proposed 
amendment to the constitution to 
enable women to vote, attracted much 
attention. 

''■ In 1SS5 our State Legislature con- 
sidered a bill asking that women be 
allowed to vote. The lower house 
passed favorably upon it, but it was 
defeated in the senate. Xo attempts 
to pass such bills have been made 
since until this year. The encour- 
agement offered by the granting of 
full suffrage to both sexes in five 
states in the Union — Washington, 
Wyoming, Colorado, Utah and Idaho, 
and partial suffrage in many others, 
is responsible for the renewed effort 
in our own State. 

A New Hampshire correspondent 
to the Phila. Public Ledger of Mar. 
6th says: "We put a book Into the 
child's hand so that he may learn to 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



read. So must the ballot be put in- 
to the hands of women in general 
before many of them will be aroused 
to a sense of individual obligations 
toward the State. Suffrage for worn- 
is a question of ethics. If it is right 
for women to vote, let the franchise 
be granted and trust the future to 
prove that women in general will 
show themselves as adaptable and 
efficient in this as in other matters." 

The Lorinier Case 

The question of Senator Lorimer's 
right to a seat in the United States 
Senate has aroused nation wide in- 
terest. Some of the best intellects 
of the Senate were ranged against 
each other and the issue was in 
doubt to the very end. 

The facts, in a nutshell, are these: 
The Illinois legislature balloted for 
senator ninety-four times without 
result. During these ballofings Lor- 
imer was not a candidate and re- 
ceived but one vote in each of the 
last four ballots. On the ninety-fifth 
ballot, wonderful to relate, he re- 
ceived one hundred and eight votes 
and was declared duly elected. 

The Illinois legislature before this 
was not noted for its political right- 
eousness, and bribery and graft were 
suspicioned at once. The Senate 
Committee on Privileges and Elec- 
tions, after an investigation declared 
him to be justly and lawfully elect- 
ed. 

Their reasoning was this: Lori- 
mer's majority was seven: admitting 
that four of these were bribed, the 
three legislators that bribed them 
were not necessarily bribed them- 
selves; hence he still had a majority 
of three. Thus the committee dragged 
this high moral question to the 
low plane of a mathematical prob- 
lem. They proved by substraction 



that Lorimer was honestly elected. 

Many, however, were those who 
opposed this sordid spirit of mater- 
ialism and commercialism. "If such 
methods are sustained," said Senator 
Root, "the Senate cannot stand; the 
government of the United States can- 
not stand." 

Senator Beveridge of Indiana, in a 
masterful speech that fills forty-sev- 
en pages of the Congressional Rec- 
ord, takes the stand that "one act of 
bribery poisons the whole fountain." 
He said that political purity is the 
very soul of free institutions and 
pointed to the fact that the British 
House of Commons unseats a mem- 
ber, though he has a majority of a 
thousand, if one vote is corrupted. 

When the final vote was taken in 
the Senate the vote stood forty-six 
to forty in favor of seating Lorimer. 
But the end is not yet. Lincoln said, 
"A question is never settled until it 
is settled right." Some of the sen- 
ators will be compelled to do some 
explaining to the folks at home. The 
people of Illinois were not slow in 
venting their wrath upon these legis- 
lators. In some places bells were 
tolled in their he nor (?) and accord- 
ing to press reports, Mt. Morris Col- 
lege disowned Senator Cullom as one 
of her honored sons. H. S. F. 

Summer Term at Elizabi'thtown 
College 

The fourth Summer Term at 
Elizabethtown College opens July. the 
third. 1911, and continues six weeks. 

Purpose. The Sumer Term affords 
excellent advantages to Improve the 
summer vacation and seeks to accom- 
modate students pursuing regular 
courses in the College and also teach- 
ers of the Public Schools, who do 
not wisli to stop teaching In order to 
finish a course of study. By attend- 



OUE COLLEGE TIMES 



ing both the Spring and Summer 
Terms, one may complete nearly a 
half year's work. Students prepar- 
ing for College or desiring to make 
up deficiencies or take advanced 
standing in their course will find 
here an opportunity to be improved. 

Instruction. A student may pur- 
sue only three studies during the 
Summer Term to which he devotes 
all his time. The length of the reci- 
tation is one hour. The instruction 
is chiefly along the line of Ancient 
and Modern Languages, Mathemat- 
ics, Pedagogy, History, etc. Credit 
will be given for work that is com- 
pleted during the Summer Term. 

Expenses. Tuition for one study 
is five dollars; for two, eight dollars; 
for three, ten dollars, payable on or 
before July 28. Text-books may be 
rented or purchased at the College 
book-room. Students may room at 
the College at catalogue rates. 
Boarding may be secured at the Col- 
lege dining-room, arrangements for 
which may be made with Mrs. E. G. 
Reber, the matron. Students will 
have free access to the College libra- 
ry and reading-rooii. For further 
particulars apply to the President. 

The Passing of the Queue 

A peculiar event is taking place 
in China at the present time — not a 
boxer uprising or a massacre of 
Christians, but a ch.nge in the style 
of hair dressing. The Chinaman is 
parting company with his hirshute 
appendage, he is laying aside his 
queue. "What a trifling matter," 
some one says, and yet, strange to 
say, it marks a stadium in the on- 
ward march of the Mongolian race. 

Let us examine the subject more 
closely. Before the lGth century 
the Chinese did not wear queues. 
About that time the Manchus obtain- 



ed supreme control of the Chinese 
empire and established the still exist- 
ing Manchu dynasty. By force of 
arms they compelled their unfortu- 
nate subjects to wear the queue as a 
symbol of submission to their con- 
querors. So strictly was the rule 
enforced that the strange style re- 
mained until our own day a univer- 
sal custom. 

The march of progress is slow but 
sure even in China. Wu-ting-Fang, 
former minister to the U. S., and 
many other leaders in Chinese 
thought and life, have publicly start- 
ed the queueless style of hair dress- 
Just as the queue was a symbol of 
subjection and submission, so the 
abolishing of the queue is a symbol 
of liberty and progress. The China- 
man is losing, as it were, one of the 
fetters that bound him to the ignor- 
ance and slavery of the past. Per- 
haps it will prove to be as notable 
an event as the "shot heard round 
the world in '76." 

We must change our conception of 
China and the Chinese. We must 
revise our geographies. The Celes- 
tial Empire is rising like a great, 
shaggy giant and is shaking off the 
sleep of centuries. The quickening 
power of Occidental civilization has 
triumphed at last. When our child- 
ren study geography they will learn 
of a new China — a civilized, progres- 
sive China. How they will marvel 
when we tell about the China of the 
geographies we studied — a country 
without a railroad or a telephone, 
where the men wore their hair in a 
funny, tail-like appendage called a 
queue. H. S. F. 

Ideals 

The address on "Ideals" delivered 
to the students in Chapel on the 



OUE COLLEGE TIMES 



morning of March 10th, by Prof. J. 
G. Meyer, was remarkable for its 
iconoclastic spirit. Prof. Meyer has 
convictions, and deserves much cred- 
it for the courage he manifests in 
expressing them. 

It is gratifying to notice the good 
effects upon our students, which this 
denunciation of wrong ideals and 
setting forth of proper ideals has 
brought about. The gist of this ad- 
dress will be found elsewhere in this 
issue. 

The outlook for the Spring term 
is very encouraging. Most of the 
rooms have been engaged, and there 
are persons from whom we expect to 
hear later. Don't forget the date 
we open, — March 2 7. 

Look out for the Governor's Arbor 
Day Proclamation. Who'll be the 
first to find it in the current news- 
papers? Two days are usually chos- 
en as Arbor Day, the one in the form- 
er, and the other in the latter part 
of April. Let us each plant a tree 
on one of these Arbor Days. Don't 
you think, dear friends, that for 
every tree that is removed from your 
plantations, another should be plant- 
ed? Even though you may not live 
to enjoy the fruit and shade thereof, 
it will give pleasure and benefit to 
posterity. We should all encourage 
the planting of trees and shrubbery 
because of their aesthetic as well as 
their utilitarian value. 



Manners must adorn knowledge 
and smooth its way through the 
world. — Chesterfield. 



A moral, sensible, and well-bred man 
Will not affront mo: and no other 
can. — Cowper. 



LITERARY 

Violets 

I do not know 

The subtle secret of the snow- 
That hides away the violets. 

Till April teaches them to blow. 

Enough for me 

Their tender loveliness to see. 
Assured that little things and large 

Fulfill God's purpose equally. 

—MARY BRADLEY 

Milton :is a Dramatis! 

Milton's epics will ever be remem- 
bered as being among the greatest 
contributions to the English lan- 
guage. However, we dare not con- 
sider Milton only ps an epic-writer. 
for his dramas are of no little value. 

Milton had much to contend with 
in the writing of the drama. In the 
first place, he himself was in sym- 
pathy with the Puritans who were 
the most hostile enemies to the 
drama. Again the drama had reached 
its golden age during Shakespeare's 
time, and was now on the decline. 
Then, too, playwriting had become a 
business. The drama, on acocunt of 
the small pay of playwriters. was no 
longer a perfected type pro I 
skill and polish ' ut a product of 
careless hands. Tl e aim vas to pro- 
duce as many play:; as possible. This 
caused the moral standard of the 
drama to fall. The t.\ p • of tl e 
drama changed to that of the Ro- 
mantic — the opposite of the Greek 
type which was Milton's model and 
which did not lie under the 
of disgrace of the Puritans. 

w hile at college, Hilton was ask< i 
by Thomas l.awes to write a 
drama for celebrating lli" . 
of the Earl of Bridgewater i 
Presidencj of Wales. The 
was complied with by the writing of 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



Comus. On account of the hostility 
of the Puritans to the drama, he dared 
not write in the popular dramatic 
form, but used one oi' the old Italian 
styles, the Masque. 

Comus is a unique little play, used 
as the means of moralizing. The 
world is represented as a wood in- 
habited by monsters whose highest 
aim is pleasure. Comus and his 
monstrous followers represent the 
evils of the world. Every person ac- 
cording to the drama has an attend- 
ant spirit to guide him, to watch 
over him, to care for him provided 
he remains chaste and upright. The 
Virgin is lost, falls irto the hands of 
the monster and is delivered; by this 
Milton shows how Purity, Chastity 
and Innocence are able to withstand 
sin. The moral is summed up in that 
rich, sweet, delicate melody: 

"Mortals that would follow me. 

Love virtue, she alone is free; 

She can teach you how to climb. 

Higher than the sphery clime; 

Or, if Virtue feeble were, 

Heaven itself would stoop to her." 

The emphasis laid upon the moral 
of Comus should not blind us to 
the homely interest of the story. 
"His choosing the simple human 
story instead of a more artificial and 
fantastical theme at once sets it off 
from the regular masque and brings 
it nearer to the Romantic Drama of 
Shakespeare and Fletcher." 

Even in this drama, we can easily 
see that Milton was acquainted with 
the classic unities. The action of the 
play begins about sunset and con- 
tinues until shortly after midnight. 
This is in strict compliance with the 
classic unity that the action should 
not extend over a space of time ex- 
ceeding twenty-four hours. 

The action of the play takes place 
in a wood near Ludlow Castle. It 



is, however, even more specific as 
the action in reality takes place at 
one spot in the wood. It is at the 
place where Comus and his followers 
have their midnight revel, by the 
noise of which the lady is attracted. 
Here it is that she is tempted and 
here the brothers find her almost 
completely charmed by Comus. They 
rush upon Comus at this place and 
break his glass. Later, Sabrina is 
called to this same place to release 
the lady from the charm. Thus the 
action confined to one place, obeys 
the second of the classic unities; 
namely, that the action shall occur 
at one place. 

Milton deviates somewhat from the 
third unity; namely, that the action 
shall be single and complete. The 
action in the case of the enticement 
is not complete. Comus does not ac- 
complish his aim as it is frustrated 
by the brothers and Attendant Spirit. 
Then again, in the case of the broth- 
ers attacking Comus, they fail to ob- 
tain the wand with which to release 
the charm, thus not completing the 
action. 

We do not have any record that 
Milton wished to obey the Classic 
Unities in Comus. On the other hand 
Samson Agonistes is a conscious ef- 
fort of the poet to follow the Greek 
Drama. He cherished a desire from 
his early College days to write a real 
Greek Drama. The mixed, irregular, 
artless drama of the time, namely, 
the Romantic, had offended him. He 
said that it was only an attempt to 
please the uncultured people who 
could not appreciate it at any rate. 
Again, the Romantic Drama would 
hardly have appealed to a blind, de- 
feated old man. Thus we have the 
probable cause for choosing the 
Greek Tragedy as his model. 

However, to use the strict Greek 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



model would bring the Drama too 
near the Romantic Drama in some 
respects. It thus became his task to 
find a drama in which the Puritans 
could not so well discern the dra- 
matic nature. This he found in the 
closet drama. This is based entirely 
upon the Greek model in respect to 
the unities but is not divided into 
acts, scenes, or strophes. "Samson, 
as the Paradise Lost, is a kind of 
dramatic Epic, is a kind of epical 
Drama. It has a central figure to 
loom up to our imagination by the 
poet's devices of culminative inci- 
dent, illustration, and comment." 

In the first place, the choosing of 
the subject was entirely after the 
Greek idea; namely, to choose a sub- 
ject that is well known to everybody. 

Next, although the drama is not 
divided into acts or scenes, yet in 
analyzing it carefully, you will find 
that it is not developed beyond the 
fifth act. Here Milton is clinging to 
the Classic idea that no drama should 
be developed beyond the fifth act. 

The action of the drama all takes 
place at Gaza. We are given a full 
and complete history of Samson's life 
through his own comment, that of 
friends, or that of a messenger. The 
action proper of the drama only rep- 
resents a few hours of his life. The 
classic unities say that the action 
shall have occurred at one place and 
that which occurs at other times and 
places must be announced by chorus- 
es or a messenger, not played. Thus. 
we see Milton's close observance of 
this unity. 

We see the Classic idea further 
illustrated in that Milton never has 
more than two engaged in a conver- 
sation. Samson and his father, lor 
example, are speaking to 
about his condition ami 
thus revealing some of Samson's past 



actions to us, and holding to the 
unity that action occurring outside 
of the time of the drama canot be 
acter. Again, Samson and Delilah 
are the only ones engaged in talking 
at another time. In this instance, 
more of his past life is given. 

The thoughts given in the various 
dialogues are sanctioned by the 
Chorus, thus bringing the Classic 
Chorus into use for presenting more 
forcibly the event- of his past life. 
Milton in Samson uses the chorus to 
announce the approach of anyone. 
Again, he uses the chorus lor describ- 
ing the people. We receive all des- 
criptions of persons through the 
mouth of the Chorus. For example, 
the approach of Delilah is first an- 
nounced by the chorus and then she 
is described thus: — 

"But who is this? What thing of 
sea or land 

That so bedecked, ornate, and gay. 

Comes this way sailing?" 

The Classic Messenger comes into 
use in announcing the catastrophe. 
At first the audience is given a vague 
idea that something has happened. 
Then he reveals a little more by say- 
ing the Philistines were slain. Then 
he states that they were slain 
by Samson. But not until he has 
gradually brought them to this de- 
gree of excitement, does he reveal 
the fact that Samson himself was 
killed. Having thus gradually 
brought the audi ice to the tragic 
incident, he rehearses the story and 
tells all the details. This is the style 
of tii.' typical Qr< • k Drama. Proba- 
bly in no other respeel does Milton 
follow the Greek model as cloeely 
as in thil 

Milton plainly avoids the under- 
plot Which is condemned l.y the 
Cla sic Unities. "He himself con- 
demned the Elizabethan underplot as 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



being the poet's error of intermixing 
comic stuff with tragic sadness and 
gravity, or by introducing trivial or 
vulgar persons only to please the 
people." 

"Milton's Samson is interesting be- 
cause it is so contrived that without 
strain, at any one point or in any 
particular, of the strictly objective 
incidents of the Biblical story which 
it enshrines, yet it is the poet's epi- 
taph and condemned autiobiography." 

.Milton is seldom considered as a 
writer of dramas since they do, by no 
means, measure up to his Epics. Yet, 
Milton's dramas are highly polished 
and dignified in construction. 
The blank verse used is the same 
lofty, dignified verse used in his great 
epic. When his dramas are com- 
pared with ot'ier great closet dramas 
of the language, he will be placed 
among the greatest dramatists of the 
English Language for polish, dignity, 
an.l clearness. Take away his great 
epics and Milton would be remem- 
bered as a great poet by his two 
dramas. L. W. LEITER. 

Ideals. 

(Gist of Prof. J. G. Meyer's Ad- 
dress, March 10th.) 

Ideals are standards of perfection 
fixed by one cr more individuals. A 
man's ideas or notions are the chief 
factors which help to fix these stand- 
ards. This agrees also with Dr. Reb- ' 
er's definition of ideals. He says an 
ideal is an idea of an end. 

The problem of every man's life 
is the development o'' his specific 
genius. Man enters the world of 
ideas by apprehending it and bringing 
it to pass in his own constitution. 
In the unfolding of the spirit life a 
man deals with the world of ideas 
only, not with matter. This world 
of ideas is to be made one soul so 



as to give rise to the beautiful, the 
true and the good. 

We get the beautiful when the 
ideal existence is realized through 
the imagination, or when we realize 
the inmost essence of things through 
the intellect. We get the true by 
intellectual reasoning, or by appre- 
hending the inmost essence of exist- 
ence thru the will. The good is the 
actualization of the ileal (Freedom) 
through the will. 

This last idea comes to view in the 
field of human action and brings con- 
duet to view. Every man wills to 
bring to pass his own ideal. This 
makes life moral. Here all turns on 
conduct, which is a human aetion, 
springing from a motive, grounded 
in the will, mediated by intelligence. 

Now the new ideal of Education 
is not Utilitarian but Character de- 
velopment, in which two factors are 
absolutely essential; viz., intelligence 
and will. A man must have a pur- 
pose 'intelligence) and faith in his 
purpose (will) in order to reach thfs 
end. The following outline will aid 
in the study of this subject: — 

Character Development — -End of 
Education — Abstract term of the 
Ideal is Freedom. 

I. Essential factors. 

A. Purpose — Intelligence. 

B. Faith in your Purpose — Will 
II. Stages. 

A. Psychological. 

1 . Naive — Prudence. 

2. Evil. 

a. Passion of Vice. 

b. Ix>ve of Evil. 

c. Hatred of Good. 

B. Ethical. 

1. Broken Character — Virtu- 

osity. 

2. Perfect Character — Wis- 

dom — Freedom. 
III. Result — The Good. 



10 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



A. Right. 

1. Origin of. 

2. Nature of. 

3. Expression of. 

a. Common Law (Lex Non 

Scripta.) 

b. Statute Law. 
e. Jurisprudence. 

B. Social Cointegration. 

1. Relation of Ascending Re- 

gard. 

2. Relation of Descending Re- 

gard. 

3. Plane of Equality. 

C. Religion. 

The realization of The Good 
through these three ideas given in 
the outline is not at random, nor ac- 
cidental but gradual, involving a pro- 
cess of development and growth. The 
whole movement is controlled by the 
internal power of man, the will with- 
out which there could be no morality. 

Points especially emphasized in the 
above outline were the three relations 
('esignated under the second differ- 
entiation of The Good. Each indivi- 
dual stands in one of these three 
relations to every other individual 
or class of individuals and every in- 
dividual stands in all of these rela- 
tions when the relation he sustains 
to his superiors, inferiors and equals 
is considered. 

The relation to his superiors is 
called the relation of the Ascending 
regard. Here the essential thing is 
not duty but receptivity, open heart- 
edness and gratitude. In the rela- 
tions to his inferiors — the relation of 
the descending regard — there is nec- 
essary a free-outgoing of love an I 
benevolence; a communicating of 
part of himself to his inferior Here 
comes to light to proper spirit of giv- 
ing. On the plane of equality we 
have a free out-going of one's self 
toward another and a mutual re- 



sponse. The outgoing is designated 
activity, impartation and benevo- 
ence. The mutual response has ref- 
erence to receptivity and gratitude. 

Social Cointegration, just discussed, 
was denned as the moral com- 
pletion of man in society through 
reciprocal relations and mutual in- 
teraction. It is here where right 
comes to view. Through the intel- 
lect man learns to know the right 
only as he associates with others af- 
ter which he wills to do it. The in- 
tellect is strong and towering but 
the will is supreme, the intellect is 
the light but the will is the pilot 
which directs the course and deter- 
mines the destiny of human action. 

In order, however, to reach the 
perfect stage of character develop- 
ment the will must be ethecized and 
brought under subjection to the Di- 
vine will through the influence of 
religion, the third differential of The 
Good. As soon as this stage has been 
reached The Ideal has been attained. 
The abstract name for this Ideal is 
Freedom. Here one pleases to do as 
one ought and not to do as one 
pleases. The will here acts in har- 
mony with the moral and religious 
idea. 



On April 20th, Dr. A. B. Van Or- 

mer will lecture tor us at the Col- 
lege Chapel on "Guesscience." This 
will be the next to the last number 
in our course. Those who beard Dr. 
Van Ormer a few years ago will want 
to bear him again, and those who 
i permitted to hear him then 
must not fail to bear him on April 
20th. 



The chapel talk given Friday 
morning, March 10, by Prof. Myer, 
was entitled, ■Student's Ideals." and 
it certainly was an Ideal talk. 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



11 



SCHOOL NEWS 



Spring term is almo! t :.i sight. 

The chief concern of students at 
present is final examinations. 

The fieh donated by Mr. Isaac Xeff 
of Harrisburg, the lather of one of 
our students, were appreciated by 
all who beard at the College. 

March 11, Miss Markley visited 
friends in Palmyra. 

The Anniversary Exercises held 
March 1th, were attended by many 
of our pat ions, friends and former 
students. Among those who remain- 
ed with us until Sunday were the 
following: Mr. and Mrs. J. J. Heil- 
man of Lancsster: Mrs. M. r:. Sheaf- 
fer of Bareville; Mrs. Isaac Sheaffer 
and daughter Mabel of Lancaster; J. 
Elmer Martin and Harry Gockley of 
Ephrata: Sadie Rover, Anna Mel- 
linger and Elizabeth Brubaker of 
Denver; Mr, Irvin Hotter, a student 
;; Millersville State Normal School, 
and the Mires Carrie Haller, Mame 
Walbert and Laura Groff. teachers 
cf the Ephrata Borough Schools. 

Our most ardent advocates of 
physical culture in the open air are 
at present Misses Kline. Sheaffer and 
Stauffer. They 'have their competi- 
tors, however, for the opportunity of 
removing mow from the campus 
walks. 

Great surprises experienced re- 
ciUly: — (a) A chicken dinner at 
one of the tallies in the College din- 
ing room through the generosity of 
Mr. Andrew Henry's parents. 

(b) Flowers, fruit, cake and ice 
cream the same day at supper at 
another table. 

(c) Occasional snowfalls since the 
return of the robi 

A large snowball grace 1 the cam- 
pus on the front of the building a 



few weeks ago, placecd there by the 
champion snowball rollers, Edris, 
Strayer, Shank, Musser, Reber and 
Hollinger. While putting this great 
ball in its desired position, they 
pushed, and tugged, and laughed for 
dear life. 

Prof. Ober has lately removed from 
the Conewago hills on fie outskirts 
of Elizabethown. forty young cherry 
trees, which will be planted in the 
College orchard or on the College 
campus, and afterwards grafte 1 with 
different varieties of cherries. 

Walter C. Herr has been absent 
from school during three weeks in 
March substituting as teacher for 
Miss Effie Shank, who has been ill 
with rheumatism. 

Several new classes have been or- 
ganized to continue during the spring 
term. Among them are, — "The Life 
of Christ." taught by Miss Stauffer 
and "Botany." taught by Prof. Ober. 

Mar. 12, Messrs. Harrison Quick- 
ley, Herman Farnsler ar.d Claude 
Withers of Palmyra, visited Mr. Car- 
per. 

Mar. 12. Mr. Kulp visited at the 
home of his roommate, Mr. Musser of 
Mountville, Pa. 

Mrs. Wise of Glen Rock, spent a 
few days with her daughter, Miss 
Irene Wise. 

March S. Rev. S. P. Sumpman, a 
former stu'ent, now pastor of an 
Evangelical church in Weissport, 
Carbon, Co., Pa., visited College 
friends. 

Tenth Anniversary 

On March 4th, College Hill was 
aflame with Anniversary spirit, the 
occasion being the Tenth Anniversary 
of the dedication of our College 
buildings. "Not very old." you say, 
and yet the heart of our Alma Mater 
swells with pride as she sees her 



12 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



noble sons and daughters out in the 
"thick of the fight," doing the work 
of the world, — Kathryn Ziegler in 
India, Ira G. Myers in the Philippine 
Islands, — W. K. Gish in Alaska, and 
many others scattered through out 
this broad land of ours. We may be 
young, but "if that life is long which 
aids In answering life's great end, we 
must count these ten years as span- 
ning eternity," for we believe tnat 
during these years she has been the 
means of instilling into the hearts 
and lives of young men and women 
noble aspirations through which 
God's eternal purpose will be 
wrought out. 

The program which was rendered 
in the College Chapel at 7.30 was as 
follows: 

Anthem, "I Will Praise Thee," Oc- 
tet; Invocation, Nathan Martin; Male 
Quartet, "O Silvery Sea"; Address, 
Dr. D. W. Kurtz, Pastor First Breth- 
ren Church, Phila.; Male Quartet, 
"We Would See Jesus"; Collection; 
Anthem, "The Land of Cloudless 
Skies." 

The chief feature of this program 
was the address on "Some Defects in 
Modern Education and their Reme- 
dies." The very fact that within the 
past few months our school has twice 
called to its rostrum our friend, Dr. 
Kurtz, is sufficient evidence of our 
recognition of him as a scholar of 
renown and a minister of extraordi- 
nary ability. 

Immediately after the program of 
exercises our friends were invited to 
the Library, where a half hour was 
spent in social intercourse. Although 
this was somewhat of a new feature, 
it proved so successful that we trust 
it will become a part of future An- 
niversary occasions. We were glad 
to welcome so many of our friends 
and former students, and note with 



satisfaction the degree of interest 
which they manifest in their school 



Long live our Alma Mater! 



K. 



College Note Book 

The newly installed officers of the 
Keystone Literary Society are, — 
Pres., H. G. Longenecker; Vice Pres., 
Calvin Rose; Sec, Gertrude Keller; 
Editor, Aaron Gish; Critic, H. K 
Eby. 

A movement is now on foot at the 
C'Olege for the organization of an 
Advanced Literary Society. The 
Faculty have suggested that all per- 
sons pursuing the Classical Course, 
and ill graduates of the school in 
College Preparatory, Pedagogical, 
English Scientific, Music Teacher's. 
Piano, and Bible courses, shall be 
eligible to membership. 

Persons entering Elizabethtown 
College in advanced standing, whose 
scholarship is equivalent to that re- 
quired in courses mentioned above, 
shall also be eligible. 

Other details concerning the or- 
ganization of this Society are to be 
worked out by those students and 
teachers now in school, who are elig- 
ible, by the opening of the Spring 
term. 

The friends of Dr. P. J. Roebuck 
of Lititz, were saddened to hear of 
his death, which occurred on Thurs- 
day. March 9th. He was one of the 
well known physicians and most 
prominent citizens of Lancaster Co. 
He delivered an address to our Com- 
mercial graduates during Commence- 
ment week. 1910. 

Alumni Notes 

On March I. we were favored with 
a \isit from Mr. and Mrs. John Heil- 
man of Lancaster. Members of the 
Alumni Association will remember 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



13 



Mrs. Heilman, as Miss Lydia Buck- 
waiter of the class of 1905. This was 
her first visit to the College since 
her marriage. Mr. and Mrs. Heilman 
visited friends at the College and in 
Elizabethtown. 

Oversight on the part of the Alum- 
ni editor was the cause that the vis- 
it of Mr. James Breitigan sometime 
ago, was not reported in last month's 
issue. He came to the College in the 
interests of the endowment fund. 
What is being done anyway? Is each 
Alumnus doing his or her part? 

A little baby girl came to grace 
the home of Mr. and Mrs. John Mil- 
ler of Lititz, on Feb. 14. Grace Eliza- 
beth came as a valentine gift. 

In next month's issue we propose 
to submit a complete roll of all child- 
ren in the homes of members of the 
Alumni Association. If any one in 
whose home there are one or more 
children, is not corresponded with, 
kindly report the names to the Alum- 
ni editor. 

Miss Emma Cashman. '1)9, in com- 
pany with several friends, recently 
spent a few days in Elizabethtown 
as the guost of Prof, and Mrs. Wamp- 
ler. 

Mr, and Mrs. Frank Reber of 
Myerstown, visited the latter's par- 
ents in Elizabethtown. on Sunday, 
March 12. 

The friends of Miss Bessie Rider 
will be interested to know that she 
is at present isolated at the General 
Hospital with a case of scarlet fever 
and two of diptheria. She also nurs- 
ed a murder case recently. Quite 
thrilling experiences for one so young 
in the profession. L. M. S. 

Senior Glass — 101 1 

The roll of eeniors ; t present is as 
follows: — 

Classical Course — Ralph W. Schlos- 



ser, Lewis D. Rose; College Prepara- 
tory Course — E. Merton Crouthamel. 
Tillman H. Ebersole, Laban W. Leit- 
er, Francis L. Olweiler; Pedagogical 
Course — M. Gertrude Hess, Henry K. 
Eby, Jacob E. Myers; English Scien- 
tific Course — Lillian Falkenstein, 
Nora L. Reber; Music Teacher's 
Course — Isaac S. Wampler; Agricul- 
tural Course — Harry B. Longeneck- 
er; Advanced Commercial Course — 
Rhoda Markley, Blaine Ober, Andrew 
M. Henry, Henry J. Shaffer; Steno- 
graphic Course — Elma Brandt, B. 
Irene Wise. 

Exchanges 

The "Amphictyon" number of the 
College Campus is made attractive 
by the numerous pen sketches in this 
fecial issue. Such things always 
add to the artistic arrangement of a 
paper. 

The song entitled "The Lost 
Chord" in the Hebron Star causes 
cue's heart to go out in pathos for 
tne person who lost that beautiful 
meiody. 

A good editorial is found in Red 
and Black on the "Father of His 
Country" and the Savior of His 
Country." How singular it is that 
the birthdays of these two notable 
men should occur in the same month. 
College Rays contains a clear ex- 
position of "A Graduate Income 
Tax." It proves that this is the 
only way to secure a fair and equal 
tax. 

"Other papers all remind us 
We can make our own sublime. 
If our fellow-students send us 
Contributions all the time — 
Here a little, there a little, 
Story, school note, song or jest. 
If you want a good school paper 
Each of you must do his best." 

—Ex. 



Religious Appointments 

Regular Preaching Services: — 

March 5, 10 a. m. — Sermon by J. 
H. Kline. Subject — "Growth in 
Christ's Kingdom." Text, Eph. 
4:15. 
March 12, 7. On p. m. — Open meet- 
ing to all. 
Christian Workers' Meeting: — 

March 12, 6.30 p. m. — Led by Prof. 
Harley. 
Mid-Week Prayer Meeting: — 

March 1— Led by Prof. H. K. Ober. 
March S— Led by H. K. Eby. 
March 1 5 — Led by Gertrude Miller 
Sunday Bible Classes: — 

Every Sunday at 8.15 a. in. In- 
ternational S. S. taught by Prof. 
Meyer and Miss Ptauffer. 
Missionary Reading Circle: — 

Every Saturday evening at C.30. 
President — B. F. Waltz. 
Teacher — Miss Stauffer. 
Reading — "The Healing of the 
Nations." 



The House of 
Good Clothes 

Signs of spring are in the air. 

Likewise the Fashions for Men's, 

Young Men's and Children's 

CLOTHING AND HATS 



Rev. James Hoffman Batten, of 
North Dakota delivered a lecture 
on Abraham Lincoln in Heisey's aud- 
itorium on March (i. This was the 
last number of the Elizabethtown 
High School Entertainment Course 
and it served as a grand climax to 
the course. He visited the College 
on the following morning and gave* 
a most excellent talk to the students 
assembled in Chapel on Prov. 29:18, 
— "Where there is no vision, the peo- 
ple perish." 



Hirsh & Bro. 



Sole Agents f.ir the Famous 

Michaels-Stern Ready-to 

Wear Suits and Overcoats, 
Men's Furnishings and Tail- 
oring. Plain Clothing a 
Specialty. Strictly one Price 
to All. 




(ietting ready earlv is wi^e man's policy 
It doesn't pay you to wait until the best 
styles have teen selected. You II say. 

there's plenty for me to choose from. 
But why not make your -election from a 
lull assortment? You'll be better pleased. 
Suits, Hats and Furnishings are all 
here in the newest and choicest spring 
styles. 

IF Y<>r LOOK YOU'LL BUY 



S. M. Myers & Co. 

Clothing, Hals 

& Furnishings 

12 East King Street 

Lancaster - - Pa. 



I h 6 Book S t o re ° n - falkenstein 
Bibles, Books, B>tationer\>, fl>ost Carfcs 



Mail oiders receive prompt attention. 



ELIZABETHTOWN 

ROLLER MILLS 

J. F. BINKELY, Propr. 

Manufacturer of Best Grades of 

FLOUR & FEED 

Use Binkley's Celebrated Mash Food 

It Makes Hens Lay. 
ELIZABETHTOWN, - PENNA. 



JOHN C. BERBERIAN 

Modern Shoe Repairing 
Work guaranteed and Prices right 

MANHEIM STREE1 



Ice Cream Confectionery, Sodas of all kinds 
Mrs. S. Hornnfit-.s' Confectionery 



POORMAN'S BAKERY 

Choice Bread, Rolls and Cakes. 

HU.MMELSTOWN STREET 



E. H. LEHMAN 



Co 



WOOD, GRAIN- 
FLOUR, PEED 



At 



SEWER PIPE, 

ETC. M .J 

Telephone 
ELIZABETHTOWN, - PENNA. 



FURNITURE 



THE MOST COMPLETE AND UP- 
TO-DATE LINE IN THIS SECTION 
OF THE COUNTRY. 

F. C. FISHER 

ELIZABETHTOWN, - PENNA. 

A. W. MARTIN 



COAL, WOOD, GRAIN 
FLOUR and FEED 

Telephone 

ELIZABETHTOWN, - PENNA. 

S. G. HERSHEY 

Groceries, Dry 

Goods and 

Notions. 

ELIZABETHTOW::, - PENNA. 



Sn r^ilOl r dry goods, notions, foot- 
r rilll r WEAR, CARPETS, LINOLEUMS 
■ I i LIIULL AND OIL CLOTHS. 



S. Market & Bainbridge Sts. 



ELIZABETHTOWN, PA. 



Jos. D. Hollinger, 

ROOFING & SPOUTING 
HOT AIR FURNACES 



Breeder of bell 'phone 

Prize- Winning 

Light Brahmas 

Elizabeth town Pa. 



Go To 

HEKR'S BOOK STORE 

112-114 N. Queen St., Lancaster, Pa. 

— for — 

BOOKS AND STATIONERY 

PENNANTS PRINTING 



Bell, 9-5. Hours 8 to G 

DR. JEROME G. HESS 

DENTIST 

Hertzler Bldg. Elizabethtown Pa, 



AMERICAN FIELD AND POULTRY 

PENCE 

JOS. H. RIDER CS, SON 



E. L RENSEL 

General Blacksmithm? 
and Repair Work 
Horse-Shoeing a Specialty. 

Park St., Elizabethtown. Pa. 



J. RALPH GROSS 

THE BARBER 

Elizabethtown, - - Penna. 



JNO. M. SHOOKERS 
WATCHMAKER AND JEWELER 

5 yrs. with L. Weber & Son 

Lancaster, Pa. 

Elizabethtown, - - Penna. 



Bell & Ind. Phones 

The Lancaster Mail Order House 

Dealers in 

New and Old Books 
East Orange St., Idiiicastcr, Pa 



For All Kinds of 

FARMING IMPLEMENTS 

Go To 

Geise & McBride 

LIZABETHTOWN, - PENNA. 



BISHOP'S STUDIO 
Photos of All Styles. 

Framing Neatly Executed. 

Center Square, Elizabethtown, Penna. 



ELIZABETHTOWN 



Cental IParlors 



HEINDEL. Dentist. 



Up-To-Date Shoe Repairing 
We Guarantee You the Best Service 

and Materials 
s. K. Barnes & s<>n. South Market si. 



FTVE AND TEN CENT STORE 

It is really wonderful what a few 
pennies will buy in our 5 and 10 
cent store and every article is useful 
about the house. Nothing in the 
store is priced for more than 10c and 
from that down to lc. 
BUZABETHTOWN, - PENNA. 



O. N. HEISEY 

Provisions, Groceries C& Choice Candies 



HEISEY BUILDING 



ELIZABETHTOWN. PENNA. 



102 Sheets 01 Fine Letter Paper 
...25 Cents... 



THE HERALD BOOK STORE 



WEST HIGH STREET 



GET MY PRICES ON 

Building Material 

PAINTS, ETC. 
before purchasing. Will be 
pleased to quote on anything 
in the Hardware line. Edi- 
son Phonographs, Sporting 
Goods, Kodak supplies, etc. 

GEO. A. FISHER 

ELIZABETHTOWX, - PEXXA. 

/. E. BELSER 

For Roofing, Spouting, Tin and 
Granite Ware, Milk Cans, Radi- 
ators, Portable Furnaces, Granite 
Lisk Roasters in four sines, or 
any special orders in my line. 
Give me a trial. 

Opp. Exchange Bank 
ELIZABETHTOWN, - PEXXA. 

SUBSCRIBE FOR 

OUR COLLEGE TIMES 
50c. PER YEAR 

0. C. RENSEL 

Choice Bread, Rolls 
& Cakes of All Kinds 

Prompt Delivery. 

S. Market St. 

EL1ZABETHTOWX, - PEXXA. 



KUHN'S 

CHOICE BREAD AND 
CAKES 

Weddings and parties supplied 
with Fancy Cakes at short 
notice. South Market Street. 

ELIZABETHTOWX, - PEXXA. 



Harry Miller 

Furniture & Undertaking 

Furniture Repairing & Upholstering 
Picture Framing 

Bell Phone 
Elizabethtown. - - Penna. 



G. WM. EEmNEE 

Manufacturing Jeweler, Class and 
Fraternity Pins, Pennants, Banners 



Lancaster, 



Penna. 



An early start, a steady pace, 
Is our way to win the race. 
We would advise those who can, 
Adopt a system, work the plan. 
Modern methods, nowadays, 
Are commendable in many ways 

AT XISSLEY'S 
LUNCH AND DINING ROOMS 

14-16 E. Chestnut St., Lancaster, Pa, 



ELIZABETHTOWN COLLEGE FACULTY 



D. C. REBER, A. M. Pd. D., President 
Philosophy, Pedagogy, German. 

H. K. OBER, Pd. B., Vice President, 
Biological Science, Agriculture, 
Surveying. 

ELIZABETH MYER, M. E., 

Elocution and Granimer. 
B. F. WAMPLER, B. E., 

Director of Music, Voice Culture. 
FLORA GOOD WAMPLER, 

Piano, Organ, Harmony. 
J. G. MEYER, Pd. B., A. B., 

Mathematics, Physical Science, 

History. 

MARY E. MARKLEY, A. M., 

English, Latin and French. 

J. Z. HERR Prin. Commercial Dep't, 
Bookkeeping, Penmanship, Com- 
mercial Law. 



JACOB S. HARLEY, A. B., 

Geography, History and Civics 

LYDIA STAUFFER, 
English Bible. 

LEAH M. SHEAFFER, Pd. B., 

Piano, Organ, Drawing, Physi- 
cal Culture. 

R. W. SCHLOSSER, Pd. B., 
Latin and Algebra. 

ELIZABETH KLINE, 

Piano, English Branches. 

AXXA W. WOLGEMUTH, 

Shorthand and Typewriting. 
DAISY P. RIDER, Pd. B., 

(Absent on Leave.) 
LAURA B. HESS, 

Sewing. 
ELD. S. H. HERTZLER, 

Exegesis (Bible Term). 



Contents 



Appreciative Words ....... 3 

Anniversary ........ 8 

Alumni Notes ........ 13 

Editorial ......... 3 

Epigrams Culled From D. Kurtz's Anniversary Address - - 7 

Exchanges ........ 12 

Literary ......... 3 

Locals - - - - - - - - 11 

Marvelous Influence on Shakespeare .... :, 

Nature Song ........ 10 

Our Elder Tree ........ 10 

Kuth, The Moabitesa ...... 7 

Society Notes - - - - - - • 11 

School News ........ r 

Senior's Arbor Day ....... 9 

The Average Man - - - - - - ■ . 4 



I 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



Vol. VIII 



ELIZABKTHTOWN, PA., MAY, 191] 



No. 



EDITORIAL STAFF : 

ELIZABETH MYER, Editor-in-Chief 

HOLMES FALKENSTEIN, Associate Editor WALTER F. ESHLEMAN, Exchanges 

LEAH M. SHEAFFER, Alumni News MAZIE MARTIN, Locals 

B. F. WALTZ, Society News GERTRUDE MILLER, Stenographer 

R. W. SCHLOSSER, Business Manager 



i is published 

and failure 



unless notice to discontinue 1 
Report changes of addn 
Terms : Fifty cents per year, 10 cents monthly. 
Entered at the Post Office at Elizabethtown, Pa. 



nthly, except in August and September. 

old subscribers, so as not to break their files, and arrearages charged, 



is paper regularly, tu the Business Mai 
i Second-Class Matter. April 19, 1909. 



EDITORIAL 

Behind the gust and the ragged cloud 
And the sound of loosening floods, 
I see young May with her fair head 
bowed, 
Walking in a world of buds. 

— Selected. 

At this time of the year, Nature 
with her opening buds, rich colors, 
and manifold beauties beckons us in- 
to the fields, the meadows and the 
woods, where we may learn the 
wonderful lessons she has to teach. 
The lingering breaths of dying Win- 
ter have, however, this season re- 
tarded the progress of the coy Spring 
time, and Prof. Ober's class in Bot- 
any are anxiously awaiting the balmy 
air and warm sunshine which will 
assure a greater profusion of full 
bloom wild flowers. 

lint amid all these calls of Nature 
we admire the diligent student who 
has strength to resist these calls, 
at times when duty to his high pur- 
pose of completing a special course 
of study demands his attention. 



Carlyle says. — "There is perennial 
nobleness and sacredness in work. 
Were he never so*benighted, forget- 
ful of his high calling, there is al- 
ways hope in a man that actually 
and earnestly w^orks. In ildeness 
alone there is perpetual despair." 

All real students in Teachers' 
courses are interested in the New 
School Code, under consideration by 
our State legislature. 

How to inform themselves on the 
detailed items of this new law is now 
their concern. 

Appreciative Words 

March 30, 1911. 

We are very busy these days but 

we found time to read Our College 

Times from cover to cover. It was 

a budget of welcome news. 

S. G. Meyer, Cashier. 
First National Bank, Fredericks- 
burg, Pa. 

March 2 9, 1911 

Mr. James II. Breitigan, in writ- 
ing to the editor-in-chief concern- 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



ing his promotion reported in our 
Alumni News column of this paper, 
says: — 

"This is due to Elizabethtown Col- 
lege and the exemplary lives I came 
in contact with while under her care, 
as these influences moulded the 
ideals to which I shall always try 
to attain." 

The Average Man 

The average man is 5 ft., 7 in., 
tall, and weighs about 154 lbs. He 
receives at least a public school edu- 
cation and engages in some useful 
occupation. He respects his fellow 
men, loves his country, and fears 
his God. He establishes a home and 
willingly gives the best years of his 
life to providing for his family. 

He does not come home drunk, or 
beat his wife, or yet divorce her. He 
does not spend his summers in Eur- 
ope or his winters in Florida. He does 
the work of the world, and others get 
the credit. He runs our railways, 
tills our farms, brings the precious 
metals out of the bowels of the earth 
and keeps the wheels of our indus- 
tries turning. His name, however, 
does not get into the newspapers. 
Wealth, honor and fame are alike 
strangers to him. 

He runs his brief course on earth; 
the burial service is pronounced over 
his open grave; he is forgotten. 

Even though his name is not in- 
scribed on the scroll of fame, be has 
contributed his mite toward the pro- 
gress of humanity. Even though he 
played a minor part in life's drama, 
he deserves our praise. We are apt 
to get a distorted view of humanity. 
When we read of one man being dis- 
honest or committing a crime, we 
are prone to forgel the ninety-nine 
who are honorable and lata 

Let us not be too cynical. Let us 



not denounce humanity for the sins 
of a few; for, after all, the average 
man is a pretty good fellow. He is 
the backbone of the nation. If he 
were not an upright citizen, our 
country could not long endure. All 
honor to the average man! 

Margaret E. Sangster has paid a 
beautiful tribute to him in the fol- 
lowing lines'. 

"When it conies to a question of 
trusting 

Yourself to the risks of the road. 
When the thing is the sharing of 
burdens, 

The lifting the heft of a load. 
In the hour of peril and trial, 

In the hour you meet as you can, 
You may safely depend on the wis- 
dom 

And skill of the average man. 

'Tis the average man and no other 
Who does his plain duty each day 
The small thing his wage is for doing 
On the commonplace bit of the 
way. 
'Tis the average man, may God bless 
him, 
Who pilots us still in the van. 
Over land, over sea, as we travel. 
Just the plain, hardy, average 
man. 

So on through the days of existence, 
All mingling in shadow or shine, 
We may count on the every-day hero. 
Whom haply the gods may divine. 
Lint who wears the Bwartb | 
his calling. 
And labors and earns as he can. 
Bui stands at the last with the nob- 
lest 

The commonplace, average man." 

ii. s. r. 



The claas in agriculture combine faith 
.1 neii. sin behalf of the College berry 

(1 fruit crops. 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



LITERARY 

Marlowe's Influence on Shakespeare 

Is the wonderful work of Shakes- 
peare due to his genius alone, or is 
he indebted to predecessors and con- 
temporaries for a large share of his 
success? Is it probable that a man 
who had served in almost every ca- 
pacity in the theatre did not perceive 
in the plays rendered what was best 
adapted to the stage? Although en- 
dowed with genius did he neverthe- 
less hestitate employing in his own 
works what he appreciated in others? 

Just to what extent his predeces- 
cors and contemporaries influenced 
him is difficult to determine. The 
works of men like Lyly, Kyd, Greene 
Lodge, and Peele contain some of 
the elements found in Shakespeare's 
works. Lyly's comedies have some 
points in 'common with Shakespeare's 
early comedies in that they are fan- 
ciful, lively, witty, and entertaining. 
Kyd and Greene had a great influence 
on the tragedy of the time and the 
latter is especially remembered for 
his introduction of romantic love 
and the genuine feeling for nature. 
Greene was a great rival of Shakes- 
peare and held him as a "Johannes 
factotum." The work of Geo. Peele 
is important because of its influence 
on Kit Marlowe. Peele used some 
excellent blank verse in his "Ar- 
raignment of Paris" and in portions 
of other plays. Marlowe was there- 
fore living in a healthful environ- 
ment at a time when blank verse was 
coming into favor but used only by 
dignified and heroic characters. 
Peele, however, did not write an en- 
tire play in blank verse until after 
Tamburlaine was put on the stage. 

All the good qualities of these 
minor dramatists were Incorporated 
in the tragedies of Christopher Mar- 



lowe who died in the dawn of his 
career. Marlowe shines forth as the 
morning star of the English drama 
and when he left the stage of life. 
he was even superior to Shakespeare. 
Shakespeare is indebted to Marlowe. 
for his perfection of blank verse, for 
his break from the classic form, for 
his emphasis on the central char- 
acter, and for his creation of histor- 
ical tragedy. 

In the hands of Marlowe blank 
verse became a mighty power. It 
gave the death blow to the old rhyme 
play and the cumbersome unrhymed 
classical plays. It was Marlowe who 
substituted blank verse for rhyme 
and prose. Although he was not the 
first to use blank verse, it was never- 
theless through his master hand 
that it was changed from a dead, 
cumbersome verse into the noblest 
and most flexible of English meters. 
The appearance of Tamburlaine in 
15S7 marks an epoch in dramatic an- 
nals. In his prologue he declared 
war against rhyme in these words, 
"From jigging veins of rhyming 
mother wits, I will lead you to the 
stately tent of war, where you shall 
hear the Scythian Tamburlaine, 
threatening the world with high as- 
tounding terms." Shakespeare sim- 
ply imbibed Marlowe's blank verse 
and later on perfected its expression. 
Marlowe reached the highest degree 
of perfection in his lines in Edward 
II, which goes to show that he was 
rapidly outgrowing his faults and be- 
coming skilled in the use of his "high 
astounding terms." Shakespeare, 
though a veritable genius, would 
surely not have advanced as rapidly 
as he did, without the suggestions 
and ready made blank verse of Mar- 
lowe. Shakespeare's triumph lay in 
his extending blank verse to different 
forms of drama. 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



Again, it was Kit Marlowe who 
taught men the proper use of the 
imagination in drama and therefore 
hroke away from models like Gor- 
boduc Ralph Roister Dolster and 
the dramas of Lyly, Greene, and 
Peele. The classic unities were no 
longer to fetter the true Elizabethan 
dramatist. Marlowe was in direct 
opposition to the dramatic theories 
of Seneca, Terence and Plautus. The 
chorus was omitted in Marlowe's 
dramas with the exeception of Faus- 
tus; all the action occurred on the 
stage and was not reported as in 
the classic plays: the imaginative is 
so prominent in Marlowe that he con- 
sequently breaks the unities of time 
and place. In no place is this better 
portrayed than in Dr. Faustus. 
These are the salient features in 
Shakespeare and even though Shakes- 
peare perceived these qualities to be 
attractive to the people, by observa- 
tion in the theatre, nevertheless, the 
honor of making the break from the 
classical drama to the Elizabethan 
form belongs to Marlowe. Here 
Shakespeare is in a sense one of 
Marlowe's disciples who finally sur- 
passed him, but surely not as a r-on- 
'temporary. 

And it is not here that Marlowe's 
influence ends. Marlowe made a 
contribution to drama that has been 
a very prominent feature ever since. 
Up to Marlowe's time there was very 
little action around a central char- 
acter, and plays had no rising action 
set forth prominently. In Mar- 
lowe's plays we have the rising pas- 
sions of men striving for conquest 
of the world, for conquest of know- 
ledge which would be all powerful, 
for conquest of the world's riches. 
It was Marlowe who first brought 
into clear relief the central figure 
and the central action, and carefully 



subordinated around each the neces- 
sary characters and incidents. Mar- 
lowe made a beautiful distinction be- 
tween the laws binding the historian 
and those binding the dramatist by 
showing that the dramatist uses what 
is remembered of a hero and the his- 
torian, the facts as they occurred. 
Dr. Faustus, Tamburlaine, and the 
Jew are striking remembranceswhich 
are made the central characters in 
his dramas. Marlowe's fault proba- 
bly lies in portraying these charac- 
ters at the expense of the others. 
But if Marlowe did make a mistake 
in making the action proceed from 
the passion of a single character, it 
nevertheless furnished an idea which 
Shakespeare perfected. Even Mar- 
lowe improved in this respect in 
Edward II. Here he las no longer 
confined the interest to Edward II, 
but also developes tho subordinate 
characters, and there is also a de- 
cided advance in the dialogue. Mar- 
lowe was still wrak in discriminating 
characters, but time proved that he 
was outgrowing this fault rapidly. 

Finally, Marlowe must always be 
remembered as the father of histori- 
cal tragedy. Marlowe's tragedies are 
far superior to Shakespeare's early 
histories and here Marlowe is truly 
the master to whom Shakespeare 
willingly submitted. Richard II, is 
inferior to Edward II, in the portray- 
al of characters and in plot. In the 
second and third parts of Henry VI, 
if Shakespeare did not actually work 
in reoperation with Marlowe, he at 
bast Imitated him in method and in 
style. Here more than in anything 
else Marlowe presented ' Shakespeare 
with a type which was not materially 
Changed by Shakespeare but only 
polished here and there by his mas- 
ter band. 

Marlowe died at the age of 29. 



OUE COLLEGE TIMES 



As a creator, a pathfinder, a pioneer, 
It is hard to place an estimate on 
Marlowe correctly. Shakespeare at 
2 9 was greatly inferior to Marlowe 
Marlowe was ripening, for there was 
a world of difference between Tani- 
burlaine and Edward II, in power and 
grammatic structure. Marlowe's 

gift of expression was showing itself 
but to say that humor would have 
been forthcoming to supply his 
greatest deficiency would be mere 
conjecture. The Jew of Malta is not 
as lofty a conception as the Merchant 
of Venice, but his Edward II, is far 
above Richard II. So it is evident 
that Marlowe excelled Shakespeare 
in historical tragedy at the former's 
death. In short, Shakespeare's work 
may be summed up as the expansion, 
rectification, and artistic ennoble- 
ment of the type fixed by Marlowe's 
epoch making tragedies." 

RALPH W. SCHLOSSER. 

Epigrams Culled from l>r. Kurtz's 

Anniversary Address, March 

4, 1911. 

One of the defects in the Ameri- 
can educational system is too much 
specializing and not enough broad 
culture. 

A college has no business to be 
a university. 

Specialism develops narrowness. 

What we need is bigger, better, 
broader men. 

Our motto should be "Breadth for 
power, depth for efficiency." 

Be a man before you are a spec- 
ialist. 

The College course should furnish 
breadth, the University, specialism. 

The Small College emphasizes the 
individual, the University, the course 

The utilitarian spirit i:; one of the 
defects in our educational system. 

Money making is a poor ideal in 



education. We should work for more 
than the dollar. 

Brick and mortar do not make a 
College, — but teachers, living touts. 

A great defect in American edu- 
cation is easy methods and machine 
methods. The child is sacrificed to 
the machine. 

American students rank below 
British and German students in men- 
tal ability and grasp. Easy meth- 
ods in education are responsible. 

You can't grow an oak in a hot 
house. For this reason the Germans 
have abolished the kindergarten. 
The children become too playful. 

.Maturity of mind and not course 
of study should be the proper test 
in education. 

Even the primary teacher, in Ger- 
many is a University graduate. 

All truth is one and coordinate. 
The lack of coordination in the dif- 
ferent departments of the College 
and University is a serious defect. 
The student branches out in sepa- 
rate lines of work and, as a result, 
doesn't unite and coordinate his 
knowledge. 

Everybody that has a will can get 
an education. 

Every argument in favor of an 
education is in favor of a complete 
education. 

You are responsible for the next 
generation. H. S. F. 

Ruth, the Moabitess 

One of the most interesting stories 
of the Bible is that of Ruth. We 
have selected this cantata for this 
year feeling that it is one of special 
beauty and strength. Every Bible 
student is familiar with the story 
and rejoices that God's hand was in 
it all, and that by divine arrange- 
ment Ruth became an ancestor of 
our Savior. 



8 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



The chorus appealing tor help in 
the time of famine in Bethlehem — 
Judah, is impressive. When a Mes- 
senger tells of plenty in t'.ie land of 
Moah, Elimelech. his wife, and two 
sons flee to the land of plenty. Af- 
ter ten years Naomi returns to her 
native land and Ruth with her, hoth 
being widows. Naomi sings a heart 
rending song bemoaning her deep af- 
fliction. She is joined by Orpha and 
Ruth, who are crushed because of 
grief; but when Naomi appeals to 
them to return to their homes, they 
sing^ a beautiful duet, "Surely, we 
will return with thee. ' 

Ruth does return with Naomi, but 
Orpha goes back to her people. The 
altering of chorus, solos, and duets 
through these scenes make it very in- 
teresting. 

When plenty is restored in the 
land Ruth is found gleaning in the 



Boaz afterward mar- 
every body joins in 
to God for his mer- 



field of Boa: 
ries Ruth a 
singing prai: 
cies. 

The duets in this composition are 
particularly striking; the solos beau- 
tiful; and chorus strong in harmony 
and pleasing in melody. The solo- 
ists for this year are especially good, 
and this truly promises to be one of 
the musical feasts of tin 
Every one who hears it should be- 
come familiar with the book of Ruth 
beforehand, if they are not already 
familiar with it. Surely this thrill- 
ing story becomes more interesting 
when told in such beautiful strains 
of music. —MRS. W AMPLER. 



John F. Seldomnd«e who was a stud- 
ent here io l!K)(i-7, died :it the home of 
his parents in Lancaster on April is, 
aged twenty-three years. We extend 
our sympathies to all his bereaved 
friends. 



SCHOOL NEWS 

Anniversary 

In spite of the inclement weather 
quite a number of our friends gath- 
ered to witness the Tenth Anniver- 
sary Exercises of the Keystone Litet- 
ary Society and the Founding of an 
Advanced Literary Society to be 
known as the Homerian. These ex- 
ercises were held in the College 
Chapel on Friday evening, April 14. 

The meeting was called to order 
by H. L. Smith, 09, now teacher in 
the Messiah Bible School at Harris- 
burg. Prayer was offered by Prof. 
H. K. Ober of the College Faculty. 
After the President's address, Mrs. 
Lydia Buckwalter Heilman, '05, of 
Lancaster read a paper on "The Early 
History of the Keystone Literary 
Society." It is no easy task to write 
a history of this kind since many 
little things of interest are not re- 
corded in the minutes of the Society, 
yet Mrs. Heilman ;;ave this history 
in a pleasing and interesting manner. 
We cull from her paper the follow- 
ing: — 

The first officers of the Society 
were: — President, J. A. Seese, Vice 
President, Kurvin Henry; Sec. Lydia 
Buckwalter; Critic, Miss Meyer. The 
committee who framed the constitu- 
tion were Miss Myer. Warren Zieg- 
ler, and Samuel Hess. 

The gavel now in use by the Key- 
stone Literary Society was made from 
a piece of wood taken from the great 
oak tree which stands on the front 
of the Donegal Presbyterian Church 
founded in 17:12. It is related that 
during the Revolutionary War a 
r came to a worshipper, Col. 
to order out the militia in 
the defense of the commonwealth. 
The congregation in this historic 
church adjourned and formed a cir- 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



cle around the Old Witness Tree, .is 
this oak tree is now known, and 
vowed eternal hostility to a corrupt 
King and Parliament, and pledged 
themselves to sustain the colonists. 

Her paper also stated that in the 
early history of the Society the; 
no solos, duetts, or quartetts but 
that all the music was furnished by 
the Society in a chorus, and that the 
selections sung were hymns from the 
"Psalms, Hymns. and Spiritual 
Songs" book used also in Chapel ex- 
ercises. The first hymn sung by the 
Society was entitled "Labor On." 
The first question debated was, Re- 
solved, "That ambition creates more 
misery than happiness." The affirm- 
ative speakers were Kurvin '.'■ nry, 
of York County, and Martin Bei 
derfer, of Elizabethtown. The neg- 
ative speakers were John Boll, oi 
Elizabethtown, now employ.': 
Pittsburg, and Warren Ziegler, 
of Royersford, Pa., now in Elgin. 111. 
The first "Literary Echo" was writ- 
ten and read by Mr. Ober Morning, 
of Elizabethtown, at present a stu- 
dent in Yale University. 

In the beginning the teachers took 
an active part in Society work. Mrs, 
Falkenstein was favorite editor and 
reciter: Miss Myer won distinction as 
Critic; Prof. Keller and Dr. Reber 
served as Choristers before the ar- 
rival of Prof, and Mrs. Wampler: 
and Prof. Ober's persuasive glances 
at the judges in debate, together with 
his convincing arguments, invariably 
won the decision in favor of him 
and his colleagues. 

With the close of each year the 
Society suffered the loss of faithful 
workers, who left College perma- 
nently to accept positions, some near 
by, and some in distant states and 
lands. The earnestness and perse- 
verance which they cultivate.! in 



their Society work became ruling 
principles of their lives, and they 
went forth to find and fill positions 
of great trust and importance. They 
have since kept right on, their hori- 
zons constantly wide nin:-'. They seem 
to have been inspire! with the 
words i ' 01 sung by the 

: iety, n," and who shall 

predict wheie they may be found 
when another ten years have passed, 
or who dare say that the Keystone 
Literary Society was not, at least in 
part, instrumental in bringing them 
this success? 

The recitation "Scaling of Pierce 
Rock' by Minerva Stauffer, '0 
given in the reciter's usual skillful 
manner. 

Mr. Glassmire, '10 and Mr. Schlos 
ser, '11, impressed well upon the 
audience the "Benefits Derived fron 
Society Work." 

The first issue of "The Critique,' 
the organ of the Homerian Society 
was read by Holmes Falkenstein, '10 

These features were interspersed 
with 'our excellent quartets render- 
ed by members of the two Societies. 
The officers of the evening not al- 
ready mentioned were, — M. Gertrude 
Hess. '11, Secretary; Leah Sheaffer, 
'10, Chorister; Prof. J. G. Myer, '05 
Critic, and C. SI. Neff, 'OS, Vice Pres- 
ident. 

Senior's Arbor Day. 
The Arbor Day Program rendered by 
the Senior (hiss on the afternoon of 
April s, «.is much enjoyed by students, 
Faculty, an. I visitors. The meeting 
was opened with a "Nature Song"by the 
class, followed by an address by the 
President, li. W. Scblosser. The Gov- 
ernor's Arbor Day Proclamation was 
re. id by Jacob Myers, oi tilen Lock, Pa. 
Irene Wise, also of Glen Lock, then re- 
cited "A Song to the Elder." A vocal 



LO 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



solo was sung by Isaac S. Warn pier, of 
Virginia. An oration was giyen 
by Tillman Ebersole, of Elizabeth- 
town. A sextette, M. Gertrude Hess, 
Mamie B. Keller, Nora Reber, Khoria 
Markley, Isaac Warn pier and Tillman 
Ebersole sang "Awake O Earth." Mr. 
George Wirt of the State Forestry Asso- 
ciation of Pennsylvania, then addressed 
the audience on the "Origin and Import- 
ance of Arbor Day." He said that in 
1882 Sterling Morton edited a newspaper 
in Nebraska in which appeared a num- 
ber of articles advocating the idea that 
through the planting of trees, the climate 
and soil of Nebraska would be so effect- 
ed as to cause less severity in storms 
and greater productiveness of soil. Mr. 
Wirt also spoke of the effect that trees 
have in lessening evaporation and in 
acting as wind-breaks. He emphasized 
the value of birds as destroyers of in- 
sects which are so detrimental to plant 
life. 

After this very instructive address the 
class marched to the east of the campus 
where, near the cottage, they gently, en- 
thusiastically, and hopefully planted 
their elder tree in College soil for the 
benefits of posterity. 

Songs Written for Arbor Day 

Nature Song 
O Nature, what a friend thou art 
To mankind, thankless for thy 

boon! 
Thy trees should touch each hu- 
man heart, 
At daybreak, evening, and at noon 
When veiled with winter's snow 

and frost, 
Or clothed in summer's garment 

green, 
When angrily by tempests toss'd 
Or scarcely moved by breeze se- 
rene. 

All hail the nionarrhs of the hills! 
Long may their sceptres hold firm 



sway, 
And long rule o'er the trickling 

Which ne'er from them will wend 

their way! 
But woe to him who in his haste, 
Without a thought the axe has 

raised, 
And trunks has cut to lay them 

waste. 
O wretched man! Can'st thou be 

praised? 

We love the trees for leafy 
boughs — 

The homes that they do there en- 
fold. 

Where songs of birds bind solemn 
vows 

In notes that come from throats 
of gold; 

And yet we pause to see, 

The shining buds and blossoms 
bright 

That God hath placed on many a 
tree, 

Because we know not Him aright. 
Words by R. W. Schlosser. 
Music by Isaac S. Wampler. 

Our Elder Tree 

There are trees in the land that are 
fair and grand. 
In the field, and the vale and hill; 
There's the stately oak and the sil- 
very beach, 
And the willow that shades the 
rill. 
Rut search as you may, for a >ear 



Oh, never a one wi 



see, yon 



lie it grand, be it fair, it will not 
compare 
With this beautiful Elder Tree. 

Chorus: — 
Then hurrah for the tree we plant, 
hurrah! 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



11 



And a merry, merry song sing we, 

hurrah ! 
To the trees, of all trees on this 

Arbor Day, 
Hurrah for our Elder Tree. 

Oh, who can declare what its branch- 
es will bear, 
For the true college girls and 
boys? 
For on it will grow many buds and 
leaves, 
As will make our hearts rejoice. 
And birds pretty dressed in their 
beautiful best, 
Such birdlings you never did see, 
did see, 
Yes, and soft nests as well, too many 
to tell, 
Will be crops of our Elder Tree. 
Chorus: — 

Its branches yet few will be many in 
time. 
Like a hundred shining gleams, 
Tell me, do you know any trees that 
bear 
Such a fruitage of silver beams? 
And so we are proud on this glad 
Arbor Day, 
Since ev'ry one must agree, agree. 
Such a tree there is none 'neath the 
moon and sun. 
As this beautiful Elder Tree. 
Chorus: — 
Words by Henry K. Eby. 
Music by M. Gertrude Hess. 

Locals. 
Vacation ! Recreation ! Fumigation ! 
Organization ! Application! 
Thus was ushered in the Spring Term 
of 1911. 
The teacher's review class is busy. 
Tennis courts are teeming with en- 
thusiasm. 
Friday afternoon and evening, Vpril 



8, the atmosphere in and about the Col- 
lege was rife with Arbor Day songs of 
the seniors, the cries of the juniors, and 
the jubilant voices of students and teach- 
ers who mingled in one another's com- 
pany for a few hours after the adjourn- 
ment of the Literary Society. 

The Social Committee, Mrs. Wampler, 
Miss Markley, Miss Kline, and Mr. 
Schlosser have the gratitude of the stud- 
ents for the features of the Social en- 
joyed by them in the evening above 
mentioned. 

Remember May 19, the date for the 
Cantata, "Ruth, the Moabitess." 

The new College Male Quartet, Messrs. 
Wm. Kulp, J. H. Finnell. I. S. Wamp- 
ler and V. C. Holsinger, all Keystoners, 
furnished half the music for the Society 
Anniversary on April 14. The other 
half was rendered by the Ladies Quartet, 
Misses Elizabeth Kline, Leah Sheaffer, 
M. Gertrude Hess and Anna Kline, the 
first three being Homerians. M. M. 

Society Notes 
A Mendelssohn Program was ren- 
dered March 31, which was as fol- 
lows-— - 

1. .Mendelssohn's Songs Without 
Words — Leah Sheaffer. 

2. Sketch of Mendelssohn's Life — 
Gussie Barclay. 

3. His Compositions — Isaac Wam- 
pler. 

4. Mendelssohn's Letters — Tillman 
Ebersole. 

5. Selections from Elijah — Prof. 
B. F. Wampler. 

G. Piano Trio. "Wedding March" 
from Mendelssohn — Misses Kline, 
Dennis, Mr. Olweiler. 

7. Traits of Character — Gertrude 
Hess. 

S. Piano Quartette, "Spring Song" 

9. Literary Echo — Aaron Gish. 

The Decennial Anniversary of the 
founding of the Keystone Literary 



12 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



Society and the founding of the 
Honierian Literary Society was cele- 
brated on Friday evening, April 14, 
by an appropriate program. Many 
former members, alumni and friends 
of the Keystone were present. The 
following program was given: 

Invocation, Prof. H. K. Ober; Mule 
Quartet; President's Address; Early 
History of Keystone Literary Soci- 
ety, Mrs. Heilman, '05, Lancaster, 
Pa.; Ladies' Quartet. "Little Boy 
Blue"; Recitation, "The Scaling of 
Perce Rock," Minerva Stauffer, '05, 
Elizabethtown, Pa.; Discussion, — 
Benefits Derived from the Keystone 
Literary Society, W. E. Glasmire, '10 
Palmyra, Pa.; R. W. Schlosser, '11, 
Elizabethtown, Pa.; Male Quartet; 
First Issue of the "Critique," Holmes 
Falkenstein, '10; Ladies' Quartet, 
"Good Night Beloved"; Critic's Re- 
marks; Adjournment. 

EXCHANGES 

We are glad to have the "Normal 
Vidette" again among our number. 
This issue contains an appropriate 
Symposium on the Tercentenary 
Celebration of the English Bible. It 
shows how great a debt we owe for 
its translation and what influence it 
has had in shaping the destinies of 
nations. 

Those who are superstitious should 
read the article in Purple and White 
entitled "Is Thirteen an Unluckj 
Number?" The writer gives a host 
of historical incidents about which 
the number thirteen clusters. 

The Freshmen number of Rays of 
Light has an appropriate cover as 
well as a fitting cover design. The 
oration "The Decisive Moment" 
makes a strong plea for solving the 
liquor problem immediately, if we 
are not to stand as a dissevered 
Union. 



"No education is complete without 
the proper mental training, which 
public speaking gives. Discipline 
along that line is at once useful and 
a mark of culture. While the study 
of elocution and oratory does not al- 
ways lead to eloquence in speaking, 
yet it aids the student in thinking 
clearly and logically and especially 
in expressing with perspicuity his 
thoughts.'' — Purple and White. 

Minister — "Johnny, do you know 
where the little boys go who fish on 
Sunday?" 

Johnny — "Sure, follow me and I'll 
show you.' — Ex. 

"Let us hope that the time will 
speedily come when man will come 
to see that God had other reasons 
for creating the birds than that of 
providing a mark for the hunter's 
gun: that the time will speedily come 
when we shall again see these beau- 
tiful little feathered creatures perch- 
ed on every tree and fence and teach- 
ing man the great lessons of unsel- 
fishness, cheerfulness and diligence." 
— Albright Bulletin. 

"I hear men are going to wear 
clothes to match their hair," said the 
Wise Guy. 

Simple Mug — "That's going to 
make it rather cool for the bald- 
headed fellows." — Ex. 

"In ancient Sparta every man felt 
himself responsible for the welfare of 
every child in the community. Had 
we in the United States such con- 
sideration of the good of the race as 
stern old Sparta manifested in her 
flint; constitution, we would tear out 
of our civilization the wasteful fun- 
gus of child-labor." 

— College Rays. 

A young lady attending college 
wrote to her parents that slu> was in 
love with Ping Pong. 

Father — "Give him up; no China- 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



13 



man for me." — Purple and White 
"As students, as citizens of a land 
which owes as much to the Bible as 
ours does, we should know better, 
we should do better. Let us choose, 
the better books. Let us take from 
its desk and place near our hearts 
the best of books. It has been long 
unchained for the world, let it now 
be unchained really and truly for 
each one of us.' Normal Vidette 

We gratefully acknowledge the 
following exchanges; Juniata Echo, 
Lordsburg College Educator, Al- 
bright Bulletin, Rays of Light. Pur- 
ple and White, and Purple and Gold 
for March; Ursinus Weekly, Friend- 
ship Baneer, Hebron Star, Xormal 
Vidette, Linden Hall Echo, and Col- 
lege Rays for April. 

ALUMNI notes 

On March 17, Miss Carrie Hess, 
'07, paid a visit to her Alma Mater. 
She has been teaching during the 
past year. 

The following is taken from the 
Lititz Record: — 

At a meeting of the Farmers Na- 
tional Bank directors, Mr. H. H. 
Gingrich resigned as cashier and was 
elected a director and afterward 
president of the organization by a 
unanimous vote as successor to the 
late Dr. P. J. Roebuck. Mr. James 
Breitigan, assistant cashier, was elec- 
ted cashier, also by a unanimous 
vote. 

The cashier elect. Mr. Breitigan, 
has done bis duty most conscien- 
tiously during the years he has been 
connected with (be bank and he is 
now in ;i position which we believe 
lie can handle with the care required 
in such a responsible position and 
in which be \\ ill without qui < ion 
prove himself the right man in the 
right place. 



Members of the Alumni Associa- 
tion and friends of Prof. J. G. Meyer 
'05 and Mr. R. W. Schlosser, '07, 
will be interested to know that on 
March 21, they were called to the 
ministry by the Elizabethtown 
church. Surely these young men 
have the best wishes of the Alumni 
Association in their new and noble 
calling. 

On Easter Sunday, Apr. 1C. Misses 
Viola Withers. '09, and Daisy Rider, 
'10, were received into fellowship 
with the Church of the Brethren, at 
Philadelphia, through the sacred 
rite of baptism. 

Good news comes to us from ev- 
ery quarter, lately. Just recently 
the report is given that Rev. J. F. 
Graybill, '07, and wife will be sent 
as missionaries to Sweden. While 
we are sorry to lose the fellowship 
of "Father" and "Mother' Graybill. 
yet we rejoice in the fact that they 
are willing and ready to sacrifice 
friends, home, country, for the Mas- 
ter. Think of it! Representatives 
in Alaska, the Philippine Islands. 
India and Sweden. May we not hope 
that ere many years have passed we 
will be represented in China and Af- 
rica? 

The Homerian Society celebrated 
its founding on the evening of Apr. 
14, when, in connection with the 
Keystone, a program was rendered. 
This new, advanced society has been 
organized mainly for graduates of 
this institution in Literary, Music 
and Bible courses. The object of 
this organization is to afford greater 
opportunity for development in ora- 
tory, elocution and argumentation. 
At present th re are about fifteen 
persons in school who are eligible 
to tins society. The name of the 
paper which this Institution will pub- 
lish is "The Critique." We expect 



great things from the organization. 

Among those who attended the 
Anniversary exercises on Friday 
evening, April 11, were H. U Smith, 
"09, Will E. Glasmire. '07, Mrs. 
John Heilman, '05, Minerva Stanffer, 
'05, Mary Hertzler, '05, I.. B. Ear- 
hart, '10, Abel Maderia, '09, Ruth 
C. Stayer. '0 7. 

A letter to Miss Myer from Mar- 
garet Haas Schwenk, '10, 3322 Lex- 
ington St., Chicago, 111., says: — 

"We send you this little note to 
announce the birth of Laura Win- 
ona Schwenk. She came to our home 
on the twenty-fifth of March. We 
are willing to share a little of our 
happiness with the dear friends at 
school by allowing you to consider 
her a prospective Ellzabethtown Col- 
lege Bible Student. 

In fulfillment of the statement 
made in the lar=t issue of the Times 
we give the following roll of chil- 
dren in the homes of members of 
the Alumni Association:— 

Paul Keifer, Stanley, Grace ami 
Ruth Ober: Paul Groff, John and 
Ruth Buff en myer; Dwight and Grace 
Shoop; Anna Martha Livengood, 
Esther Mae Blough, Erma Floy 
Schlosser, J. Emmert Herr, Grace 
Elizabeth Miller, Laura Winona 
Schwenk. L. M. S. 



Eld. <!. X. Knlkenstcin an:', Prof. 
H. K. Ober will represent the Eliza- 

bethtown church at Annual .Meeting 
this year. 



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Sole Agents for I he famous 
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Wear Suits and I )\ ercoats, 
Men's Furniebings and Tail- 
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Spocialtv. Strictly one Price 
to All. 



The House of 
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Signs of spring are in the air. 

Likewise the Fashions for Men's, 

Young Men's and Children's 

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Suits, Hats and Furnishings are all 
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pleased to quote on anything 
in the Hardware line. Edi- 
son Phonographs, Sporting 
Goods, Kodak supplies, etc. 

GEO. A. FISHER 

ELIZABETHTOWN, - PENNA. 

/. B. BELSER 

For Rooting, Spouting, Tin and 
Granite Ware, Milk Cans, Radi- 
ators, Portable Furnaces, Granite 
Lisk Roasters in four sizes, or 
any special orders in my line. 
Give me a trial. 

Opp. Exchange Bank 

ELIZABETHTOWN, - PENNA. 

SUBSCRIBE FOR 

OUR COLLEGE TIMES 
50c. PER YEAR 

0. C. RENSEL 

Choice Bread, Rolls 
& Cakes of All Kinds 

Prompt Delivery. 

S. Market St. 

ELIZABETHTOWN, - PENNA. 



KUHN'S 

CHOICE BREAD AND 
CAKES 

Weddings and parties supplied 
with Fancy Cakes at short 
notice. South Market Street. 

ELIZABETHTOWN, - PENNA. 



Harry Miller 

Furniture & Undertaking 

Furniture Repairing & Upholstering 
Picture Framing 

Bell Phone 
Elizabethtown, - - Penna. 



G. WM. EEISXER 

Manufacturing Jeweler, Class and 
Fraternity Pins, Pennants, Banners 



An early start, a steady pace, 
Is our way to win the race. 
We would advise those who can. 
Adopt a system, work the plan. 

Modern methods, nowadays. 
Are commendable in many ways 

AT NISSLEY'S 
LUNCH AND DINING ROOMS 

14-16 E. Chestnut St.. Lancaster, Pa. 



ELIZABETHTOWN COLLEGE FACULTY 



D. C. REBER, A. M. Pd. D., President 
Philosophy, Pedagogy, German. 

H. K. OBER, Pd. B., Vice President, 
Biological Science, Agriculture, 
Surveying. 

ELIZABETH MYER, M. E., 
Elocution and Grammer. 

B. F. W AMPLER, B. E., 

Director of Music, Voice Culture. 

FLORA GOOD WAMPLER, 
Piano, Organ, Harmony. 

-X G. MEYER, Pd. B., A. B., 

Mathematics, Physical Science, 
History. 

JMARY E. MARKLEY, A. M., 

English, Latin and French. 

J. Z. HERR Prin. Commercial Dep't, 
Bookkeeping, Penmanship, Com- 
mercial Law. 



JACOB S. HARLEY, A. B., 

Geography, History and Civics 

LYDIA STAUFFER, 
English Bible. 

LEAH M. SHEAFFER, Pd. B., 

Piano, Organ, Drawing, Physi- 
cal Culture. 

R. W. SCHLOSSER, Pd. B., 

Latin and Algebra. 
ELIZABETH KLINE, 

Piano, English Branches. 

ANNA W. WOLGEMUTH, 

Shorthand and Typewriting. 

DAISY P. RIDER, Pd. B., 

(Absent on Leave.) 
LAURA B. HESS, 

Sewing. 
ELD. S. H. HERTZLER, 

Exegesis (Bible Term). 



Contents 

A Letter From India ...---- 7 

Alumni Notes ...---'•-- 12 

Benefits Derived From the Keystone Literary Society 

Calendar For Commencement Week ----- 3 

Dedication _...---- o 

Editorial ....----- 3 

Exchanges -------- 10 

House Cleaning - ....-- 4 

History oi Brethren Church - - - - - • U 

Locals --------- 13 

Literary --------- 6 

Marriages - - - - ■ ■ ■ " - 1- 

Keligious Appointments ...--- 14 

Society Notes .....-- 11 

School News 10 

The New School Code ...... 3 

The Agricultural Department ------ 1'-' 

When Earth's Last Picture is Painted .... 6 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



ELIZABKTHTOVVN, PA., JUNE, 1911. 



EDITORIAL STAFF: 

ELIZABETH MYER, Editor-in-Chief 

HOLMES FALKENSTEIN, Associate Editor WALTER F. ESHLEMAN, Exchanges 

LEAH M. SHEAFFER, Alumni Newi MAZIE MARTIN. Locals 

B. F. WALTZ, Society News GERTRUDE MILLER, Stenographer 

R. .W. SCHLOSSER, Business Manager 



Our College Tim 
The paper 



August and September, 
as not to break their files, and arrearages charged, 



i published monthly, except i 

vill be sent contiuously to old subscribers, 

discontinue has been received at expiratior 
Report changes of address, and failure to receive this paper regularly, to the Business Ma 
Terms : Fifty cants per year, 10 cents monthly. 
Entered at the Post Office at Elizabethtown, Pa., as Second-Class Matter, April 19, 1909. 



EDITORIAL 

Calendar for Commencement Week 

Sunday, June 1! — The Baccalau- 
reate sermon will be preached in the 
evening by J. W. G. Hershey, of 
Lititz, Pa. 

Monday. June 12 — The Music De- 
narrmfiit will render a program in 
the evening which will consist or" a 
variety of vocal and instrumental 
selections. 

Tuesday, June 13 — The graduates 
in the Commercial Department will 
have a program of their own on Tues- 
day evening. Features of the pro- 
gram will be: — Oration, "Profit and 
Loss." Rhoda Markley. Elizabeth- 
town, Pa.; Recitation, "Kentucky 
Belle," Elma Brandt, Manheim, Pa.; 
Address, Dr. H. M. Rowe, Baltimore, 
Md. 

Wednesday afternoon, June rt — 
The Class Day Exercises will be held. 
Some of the numbers on this pro- 
gram will be, — Class History by 
Lilian Falkenstein, Class Prophecy, 
by H. K. Eby, Class Poem by Mamie 
Keller. 



Wednesday evening, June 14 — 
The public Alumni Meeting will be 
held in the interests of the Alumni 
Association. The following program 
will be rendered: 

President's Address, A. G. Hotten- 
stein, 'OS; History of Class of 1903 
and 1904, Irvin Shoop, '04; Recita- 
tion, Floy Crouthamel, '10; Oration, 
G. H. Light, '05; Address, J. F. 
Graybill, '07. 

Thursday, June 15 — Commence- 
ment exercises proper will be held 
beginning at 9.00 a. m. All these 
exercises are open to the public and 
the presence of our friends will be 
very much appreciated. 

The New School Code 

The New School Code which was 
framed by a commission appointed 
by Gov. Stuart in 1907, was passed 
by both houses of the State Legis- 
lature and signed by Gov. Tener on 
May ISth. This new Code is a com- 
pilation of all laws relating to school 
regulations in any form. It is really 
a budget of all the laws governing 
the public school system of this 



OUE COLLEGE TIMES 



State. It provides for an appointive 
board of education composed of fif- 
teen members in districts of the first 
class, Philadelphia and Pittsburg; 
elective boards of nine members in 
second class districts; of seven in 
third class districts and five in fourth 
class districts. 

The code designates the power of 
the various school boards and of- 
ficers and sets the length of the 
terms and tenure of office of school 
directors. In short, it includes all 
the laws governing school districts, 
school directors, organization meet- 
ings and officers of boards of school 
directors, duties and powers of 
boards of school directors, taxation 
and finance, grounds and buildings, 
books, furniture and supplies, school 
directors associations, State Board of 
Education, Superintendent of Public 
Instruction, county, district and as- 
sistant superintendents, teachers and 
supervising principals, certification 
of teachers, pupils and attendance, 
medical inspection and hygiene, 
school terms and courses of study, 
high schools, joint schools, vocational 
and other special schools, state nor- 
mal schools, teachers' institutes. 
school districts of the first class, 
State appropriations, teachers' re- 
tirement funds, public school libra- 
ries, auditing of school finances and 
State school fund. 

The members of the Commission 
who compiled this New Code were 
Dr. X. C. Schaeffer, Dr. G. M. Phil- 
ips, Dr. M. G. Brumbaugh. David B. 
Oliver, John S. Rilling. James M. 
Coughlin and William Lander. 

Dr. Schaeffer says. "Although the 
code in its final form is a compro- 
mise, it is the best school legisla- 
tion thai can be secured at this time 
and probably tor yeara to come, if 
the legislature makes the appropria- 



tions necessary to carry all the new 
provisions into effect, it will mean 
a big step forward in our educational 
development. The Governor has 
been very earnest in the work of 
enacting and perfecting the New 
Code, and above all others will re- 
ceive the plaudits of future genera- 
tions. The Senators and Representa- 
tives, who worked so faithfully and 
persistently for the enactment of the 
Code, will be lauded in history with 
those who passed the school legisla- 
tion of 1834, 1835 and 1836." 



Miss Daisy Rider writes that her 
work at the School of Design in 
Philadelphia, is most fascinating. 
She expects to continue her work 
there another year or more. She and 
Miss Withers had the pleasure of ac- 
companying Mr. Elmer Minnich and 
his bride to places of interest, while 
in Philadelphia on their wedding 
trip. 

Among the many encouraging 
words in a letter from G. H. Light, 
'07, Hatfield, Pa., are these: — 

"Like the rains feed the many 
mountain springs, so 'Our College 
Times', perpetautes the fountains, 
which have sprung up in the lives 
of those of us who have left our Al- 
ma Mater. 

It is like a letter from home, es- 
pecially in this particular: — It is too 
short at one end." 

House Cleaning 
During the month of May the busy 
housewives all over this broad land 
of ours, feel it their solemn duty 
• pen every room in the house 
by turns, from garret to basement, 
ami rlcati nut not onl> the larger 
parcels "i waste matter, but every 
nook and corner must be thoroughly 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



cleansed of cobwebs and dust parti- 
cles. Extreme cleanliness is a spe- 
cial characteristic of the Pennsyl- 
vania German "frau." Her walls are 
either neatly papered or white-wash- 
ed with such extreme care as to re- 
semble marble, or mosaic. The glass 
in her windows fairly glistens, and 
her floors and porches are almost as 
white as Ivory Soap. These quali- 
fications are very commendable, since 
"Cleanliness is next to Godliness." 

House cleaning is a custom of ut- 
most importance because of its sani- 
tary influence. Our dwellings in 
which filth and disease germs are al- 
lowed to accumulate and which are 
so often kept almost hermetically 
sealed and poorly vetilated during 
the cold months of winter, surely 
demand a most rigid cleansing so 
as to render them insusceptible to 
the attacks of brigands of bacteria. 

Is it not singular that just prior 
to our cleaning of the temporal house 
should come the season of spiritual 
house cleaning known as the Lenten 
Season, or the Season of Lent? This 
season including forty days before 
and terminating with, the crucifixion 
of Christ is observed by the Catholic 
and some Protestant churches thru- 
out the world. While it may be best 
id keep our spiritual house always 
free from contamination with Satan 
andhis many devices, yet since human 
beings are so neglectful in this mat- 
ter, the Lenten Season or season 
when house cleaning and inventory 
of the heart or inner life is given 
special attention, is a blessed oppor- 
tunity tor those who neglect this 
work each day of their lives. 

God sanctify the Lenten and House 
cleaning Seasons to our every tem- 
poral comfort and spiritual good. 

Rufus Bucher and his father both 



have secured for the summer the ser- 
vices of Indian boys from the Carlisle 
School. Persons employing students 
from the Carlisle School are required 
to send in monthly reports including 
answers to the following questions: 
Where does the boy spend his even- 
ings? Does he attend church and 
Sunday School every Sunday? Does 
he take baths regularly? Is he in 
good health at present? Does he use 
any tobacco, intoxicating drinks, or 
profane language in any form? 

How would some of our Caucasion 
boys like to be restricted with rules 
similar to those mentioned above? 



The District Meeting held at Man- 
heim on Thursday, May 4 was very 
largely attended. One of the most 
important decisions made at this 
meeting was the division of the old 
Eastern District into two parts, each 
of which will now have its repre- 
sentation on the Standing Committee 
at our Annual Conference. The 
Reading Clerk at this meting was 
Elder Jesse Ziegler, of Royersford, 
and the Writing Clerk was Elder S. 
H. Hertzler, of Elizabethtown, both 
being trustees of our College. At 
this conference George H. Light. '07 
of Hatfield. Pa., was appointed As- 
sistant Sunday School Secretary of 
the Eastern District of Pa. This ap- 
nointment was brought about through 
the request of Prof. H. K. Ober who 
on Sunday. May 7, began his third 
year's work as General Sunday School 
Secretary of above named district. 



Our townsman, Mr. S. P. Engle, 
discovered during the housecleaning 
season, eight valuable books not in 
use by his family so he concluded 
to donate them to the College library. 
His son Harold, a bright little lad 
of twelve summers loaded these 



OUK COLLEGE TIMES 



books on his express wagon, hauled 
them up to the ladies' entrance at 
the College, rang the bell, and turned 
the books over to the Librarian. Our 
sincerest thanks are due to Mr. and 
Mrs. Engle for the books, and to 
Harold for delivering them. 

On May 2, the School Directors of 
Lancaster County in their Tri-annual 
Conference held in the Court House 
at Lancaster, unanimously elected 
Prof. Daniel Fleisher, as superintend- 
ent for three years at a salary of 
three thousand dollars a year. Prof. 
Fleisher soon after published the 
dates on which teachers' examina- 
tions will be held, beginning with 
May Sth and ending on June 13th. 

The readers of Our College Times 
will note with interest on another 
page of this issue, a letter written 
to them by our missionary in India, 
Kathryn Ziegler, '08. 



Those of our friends who remem- 
ber Miss A. Lizzie Myer, of Lancas- 
ter, who was a student here in 1907- 
08, may have heard that shortly af- 
ter leaving school she was married 
to Dr. C. A. Whisler of the State of 
Washington. The first few years of 
her married life were spent in Los 
Angeles, Cal., but she and her fam- 
ily have recently moved to 102 Mor- 
gan street, Union Hill, New Jersey, 
where her husband is practicing os- 
teopathy and optics. They are at 
present members of the Church of 
the Brethren at Brooklyn, where 
they attend services as regularly as 
can be expected. 



LITERARY 

When Earth's Last Picture is Painted 

(Poems by Rudyard Kipling.) 
When Earth's last picture is painted, 
And the tubes are twisted and 

dried 
When the oldest colors have faded, 
And the youngest critic has died. 
We shall rest — and, faith, we shall 
need it — 
Lie down for an aeon or two 
Till the Master of All Good Work- 
men, 
Shall set us to work anew! 

And those that were good shall 
be happy! 
They shall sit in a golden chair 
They shall splash at a ten league 
canvas 
With brushes of comet's hair: 
They shall find real saints to draw 

from 
Magdalene, Peter and Paul: 
They shall work for an age at a 
sitting 
And never get tired at all! 
And only the Master shall praise 



And only the Master shall blame; 
And no one shall work for money. 
And no one shall work for fame: 
But each for the joy of the working. 
And each to his separate star, 
Shall draw the Thing as he sees it 
For the God of Things as They are. 



The beautiful green rye on S. G. 
Graybill's farm near the College is 
icw being cut and hauled into the 
feeding barn and silo. 



Dedication 

If I were hanged on the highest hill. 

Mother o' mine. O mother o' mine! 
I know whose love would follow me 
still. 

Mother o' mine, O mother o' mine! 

If I were drowned in the deepest sea. 
Mother o' mine. O mother o' mine! 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



I know whose tears would come down 
to me 
Mother o' mine, O mother o' mine! 

If I were dammed of body and soul, 
I know whose prayers would make 
me whole, 
Mother o' mine, mother of mine! 



A Letter From India 

Jalalpar, Surat Dist., India, 
March 8, 1911. 
Dear Readers, — 

For some time I 
have been thinking of writing a let- 
ter to you all, and this morning I 
thought I had nothing special to do, 
and so I made an early start at this 
letter, but it is almost noon now and 
I am still beginning my letter; so I 
will just tell you what I have been do 
ing. Some natives came for medicine 
then a woman came selling charna. 
She was hardly gone until a woman 
selling fish came in so I laid by my 
pen again. There are many such days 
that are spent in doing little duties. 
After one has been here awhile and is 
interrupted so many times, he can 
more fully realize a certain Mission- 
ary's situation, who wrote to one of 
his friends and said, "I am getting 
along well in my work if only the 
heathens did not annoy me so 
much." One almost feels annoyed, 
but it is well to give ourselves time 
to think of the purpose for which 
we are here, and then go on doing 
these small duties feeling that there 
are great blessings in small things. 
It will not be long now until Sis- 
ter Quinter will return and again 
take charge of her work. After that 
I expect to do village work with a 
Bible woman to help me. I am very 
anxious to get into the homes and 
become better acquainted with the 
people and their way of living, so I 



hope to give you some of my exper- 
ience along that line later. 

Today we expect one more for the- 
home, well, really three more, a; 
mother and two children. Her hus- 
band died of consumption several 
days go, and she will now make her 
home here. We look after their 
food and clothing, once a week, have 
sewing class for them, also one after- 
noon teach them a scripture lesson. 
We have morning worship every 
morning, and two services each Sun- 
day, — S. School and a short service 
In the afternoon. This may seem 
a small program to the reader, but 
not so to the writer, who is still not 
very familiar, but the Lord's promis- 
es are sure to those who trust in 
Him and we feel that he will bless 
every effort put forth in His fear. 

Last week it was my happy privi- 
lege to attend our District Meeting 
held at Nulli, one of our mission 
stations; and while my cup of joy 
is still brim full and running over 
I will tell you at least part of the 
good, — I can't possibly tell it all. 

On the morning of Feb. 2 7, a few 
of us joined a number from Bukar 
on their way to Dist. Meeting. They 
had a special car from Buckar, so 
there was no one but Christians in 
our car and when we left here there 
were fifty-seven of us. We forgot 
race, distinction, and felt like chil- 
dren of the same Father, a happy 
band, we were going to District 
Meeting. Among our number were 
six of our Mission family, and Bro. 
Weiand and his wife, from Chicago, 
111. The rest were native Christians. 
Our car was labeled "Orphanage 
girls, Bukar." Whenever our train 
stopped, the girls would all join in 
singing a familiar hymn, and we 
were assured again of the drawing 
power there is in music, because of 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



the crowds that would gather to hear. 
We reached our destination about 
twelve o'clock noon. The place of 
the meeting was nearly three miles 
away, there were one buggy and sev- 
eral bullock carts there. One who has 
had a bullock care ride prefers to 
walk if at all possible. So our bag- 
gage was put on the carts, a few rode 
in the buggy and the rest walked. 
We took the shortest way and passed 
through a number of cotton fields, 
where cotton pickers were at work. 
We finally reached the Mission, where 
we found house dinner waiting for 
us. The afternoon was spent in 
pleasant conversation. In the even- 
ing W. B. Stover preached a fitting 
sermon on the text, "Hitherto the 
Lord has helped us," 1 Sam. 7:12. 
He presented many proofs of the 
Lord's help in the past, which en- 
couraged us to press on. 

In connection with the D. M., we 
also had a Missionary and Sunday 
School meeting. There was a pro- 
gram arranged for each meeting to 
last a half a day; but the speakers 
were so full of their subjects that 
the time was too short. The speakers 
were almost all native Christians. 
The meeting was an inspiration, and 
many times tears of joy flowed to see 
the zeal and earnestness of those so 
young in the service. 

Our native minister, Lellu Jalem, 
indicate ! by a map the large field 
still unoccupied within our reach and 
the door open for us to enter in 
among ten million people of the Bhil 
tribe, who are untouched by the gos- 
pel but seem to be ready. He called 
our attention to John 4:35 — "Lift 
up your eyes and look on the fields; 
for they are white already to har- 
vest." We felt as a handful among 
such a vast number, and we prayed 
earnestly for more laborers, to help 



gather in the lost. 

Many of our native brethren havt> 
offered to take more work besides 
what they are already doing. I am 
sure all of us have resolved to make 
greater efforts for the spreading of 
the gospel. 

Bro. Weiand gave us a helpful talk 
Bro. Stover interperted his words of 
encouragement and counsel, which 
were appreciated by all. 

The work of the D. M. took a 
half day; new officers were appointed 
and new members on the home Mis- 
sion Board; the money from the dif- 
ferent stations was handed in; the 
denial money with other money col- 
lected during the year amounted to 
over six hundred rupees. 

There is so much more I would like 
to tell you, but I am afraid there is 
too much chaff for the wheat there 
is in it. so I will just tell you yet, 
that it was a glorious meeting, a 
feast to the soul, which strengthen- 
ed us for the Lord's work. 

The first D. M. 1 attended. I un- 
derstood but a few words and this 
time there was very little 1 did not 
understand. How glad I am! and I 
know that you, who know me rejoice 
with me. 

I did not think of writing such a 
long letter, but I will give the Editor- 
in-chief permission to omit some of 
it. 

Some times I think I ought to 
hear more from my Alma Mater, but 
I know it's a busy place and I am 
very grateful that 1 receive a good 
letter in the form of the College 
Times. I scan its pages fron 
in iincr. even the advertisements 
too. 

I hope the Business Manager "ill 
never forget the subcriber across the 
sea. 

My mind is often carried back to 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



the pleasant days spent on College 
Hill. But now teachers, school mates 
and class mates are scattered here 
and there. I wish if it were possi- 
ble, I could hear from each one, and 
I am glad that many times through 
the Times, I do hear of your where- 
abouts and success. 

You can feel that you have my 
good wishes and prayers in all work 
done in God's fear and I feel that I 
have your prayers for the work here. 

God has so abundantly blessed me 
in health since I am over here, I 
can not be too grateful for it. 

I could keep on writing but it 
is well to close with this or you may 
never want another letter from India. 
Fraternally yours, 

Kathryn Ziegler. 



Benefits Derived from the Keystone 
Literary Society 

( Speech delivered on Anniversary 
Night, April 14.) 

On this eve, the Decennial Anni- 
versary of the Keystone Literary So- 
ciety I am glad to be with you. To 
have the honor of representing the 
Keystone on this auspicious occasion 
is far more than I deserve. 

To stand before a body of College 
bred men and women, — trained in 
the arts and sciences where the 
breaking of the laws of Rhetoric is 
far more inexcusable, than breaking 
the law of silence, is vastly different 
than sitting where the hum of ma- 
chinery makes music for your en- 
joyment, while you are wielding the 
pen over delinquent accounts and 
racking your brain over arithmetical 
processes. 

The subject before us fe one of 
great importance to all, especially to 
you young members and to the pros- 
pectives. It should be studied by all, 
"Benefits derived from the Keystone 



Literary Society." 

If all would give this their most 
careful consideration, there would be 
no difficulty in securing new members 
and in making busy bees out of the 
drones. 

You do not realize at the present 
time, the true value of being an ac- 
tive member of this Society. Some 
day when you leave the sheltering 
walls of your Alma Mater and the 
tender care of your Professors, which 
will always be sacred to your mem- 
ory, you will enter a new training 
with different methods and experi- 
ences. 

There you will not be trained by 
systematic teachers, but you will 
have to fight your own way to know- 
ledge and wisdom, and struggle up- 
ward and onward with not only lit- 
tle assistance, but with almost every 
man's hand against you. Then you 
will need all the quickness of thought 
you can command, all the convincing 
argument and stability of character 
at your disposal. These can not be 
gained any where except through the 
training obtained by faithful service 
in the Literary Society. 

Benefits to be derived from this 
source are too numrous to mention. 

Appearing before an audience will 
cause you to become more compos- 
ed. To be fidgety and nervous in 
the presence of people will be a 
hindrance in your business. As you 
appear from time to time before your 
audience as essayist, declaimer or 
as musician or in answering referred 
questions, you become accustomed to 
speaking under criticism and finally 
you will gain control over yourself 
which will surprise both you and 
your hearers. 

Serving in the capacity of officials 
in this Society is an invaluable asset 
to your education. 



10 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



The President becomes acquainted 
with the laws governing bodies of 
men in a way which will fit him for 
the same capacity in a higher posi- 
tion in life. Every boy ought to as- 
pire to this honor. The Parliamen- 
tary Drill will cause him to study 
the constitution and by-laws of the 
Society, in a way he would not do 
otherwise. 

The debate offers the greatest 
benefits. 

In the preparation of this, vigor- 
ous thinking is required. In the 
analysis of the subject the debater 
must know how to select the strong 
points, and to frame sentences to 
establish these points. 

In preparing for debate, depend 
upon yourself to work out these 
problems. "Your own gift you can 
present every moment with the 
cumulative force of a whole life's 
cultivation; but of the adopted tal- 
ent of another, you have only an ex- 
temporaneous, half-possession." 

That which each man can do best, 
none but his Maker can teach him, 
No man yet knows what it is, or 
can, till that person has exhibited it. 

In all circumstances, as a man Is 
under God, the Master of his own 
fortune, so is he the maker of his 
own mind. The Creator has so con- 
stituted the human intellect, that it 
can only grow by its own action, and 
by its own action and free will, it 
will certainly and necessarily grow. 
Depend upon yourself. Books and 
Teachers are but helpers; the work 



W 



E. GLASM1RE. 



The playing of lawn tennis is the 
great craze at present. Pour courts 
are in use during the evening and 
Saturday afternoon recreation per- 
iods. 



SCHOOL NEWS 

Exchanges 

We feel highly gratified that we 
can have "The College Student" a- 
mong our exchanges. This paper is 
of especial interest to us since it is 
the representative of our 'county col- 
lege, Franklin and Marshall. "An 
Inherited Difficulty" gives an exam- 
ple of a Lancaster county college 
boy trying to overcome the German 
accent in his language. 

The prize oration in "Juniata 
Echo" rings with the true oratorical 
style that was characteristic in the 
days of the Roman Forum. The au- 
thor pays high honor to the memory 
of John Marshall, the "Builder of a 
Nation." 

A timely Editorial on the Barnard 
Statues is found in the "Albright 
Bulletin." The writer states that 
the "rare genius of George Barnard 
would be a better ideal to set before 
Pennsylvanians than the names and 
statues of some recent politicians." 

"As our fathers dared the tyrant's 
wrath and laid their all on the altar 
for patriotism, so shall we. As our 
fathers gave thanks to God for the 
blessings of freedom they enjoyed, 
so shall we. As our fathers died on 
the field of battle that the nation 
might live, so shall we, urged on by 
the heroism of a glorious past, live 
lives that will equal their sacrifice, 
that the nation may never die." 

Juniata Echo. 

"The best and most important part 
of every man's education is that 
which he gives him sell." 

Gibbon 

"The place where character usual- 
ly breaks down is not in the great 
things but rather In the small things 
of life. At a time when i 
is watching and there is a 



OUK COLLEGE TIMES 



11 



chance to be made a hero and the 
topic of conversation among the peo- 
ple, one can easily be honest, for 
the incentive to do so is great." 

Albright Bulletin 

"In order that man may finally 
reach the goal intended for him, it 
is necessary that from birth the best 
care be taken of him, both physically 
and mentally; and in order that this 
might be accomplished, owing to 
man's great plasticity, the period of 
development must necessarily be 
long." 

Philomathean Monthly. 

"Thus, like Assyria, like Persia, 
like Greece, like Carthage, like Rome 
like Spain, shall we not reach our 
Zenith and fall? Let every Ameri- 
can citizen answer this question. Let 
each one work to remedy the evils. 
And may our great nation, stand as 
long as the earth stands, for the 
glory of God, as the exponent of all 
that is great and noble in man. 

College Rays 

The following exchanges were re- 
ceived during the past month; Phil- 
omathean Monthly, Lordsburg Col- 
lege Educator, Juniata Echo, College 
Student, Hebron Star, Linden Hall 
Echo, College Rays, Albright Bulle- 
tin, College Campus, Purple and 
Gold, Ursinus Weekly, Friendship 
Banner, and Rays of Light. 

W. F. E. 

Society Xotes 

The Keystone Literary Society has 
rendered excellent programs during 
the past month. Although the Sen- 
iors are very busy with theses and 
orations, they are taking an active 
part in the work. They seem to feel 
that the work rests on their should- 
ers, and they are performing their 
part nobly with all their other duties. 

The undergraduates are preparing 



to receive the Seniors' mantle and 
to press forward with a double por- 
tion of vim and vigor next year. 

The questions debated by the so- 
ciety recently were: (1) Resolved, 
That the Rural Schools should be 
consolidated; (2) Resolved, That the 
Pulpit is more powerful than the 
Press; (3) Resolved, That Trade 
Schools should be maintained at pub- 
lic expense. 

On May 5, Prof. Meyer gave a 
practical science talk, dring which he 
had his Physics and Chemistry class- 
es perform experiments, before the 
Society. 

The present officers of the Society 
are, — Pres., William K. Kulp, of 
Ephrata: Vice Pres., Andrew Henry 
of Hershey, Pa.; Secretary, Orpha 
Harshberger, of Johnstown: Editor, 
Walter Herr, of Elizabethtown; Crit- 
ic, Mamie Keller, of Shrewsbury. 

B. F. W. 



History of Brethren Church 

The Committee appointed by the 
recent District meeting held at Man- 
heim to compile a history of the 
Church of the Brethren in the 
Eastern District, met at Elizabeth- 
town on Monday, May 15. The 
members of this important commit- 
tee are S. R. Zug, D. C. Reber. J. 
G. Francis, G. N. Falkenstein and 
Jno. Herr. It is their duty to com- 
pile and publish a complete history 
of the Brethren congregations east 
of the Susquehanna, from the found- 
i irr of the Church in America to the 
present time. 

The committee began work by 
electing the following officers: Pres., 
S. R. Zug; Sec, G. N. Falkenstein; 
Treas.. Jno. Herr. Sub-Committees 
were then appointed to furnish the 
biographical sketches of church 
leaders and the history of the char- 



12 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



Uable ind educational work of the 
church respectively. Each congre- 
gation will be officially consulted 
and its history carefully learned. 
The committee represents prominent 
men who have already distinguished 
themselves in the educational and 
historical phase of church work and 
it is needless to say that the resultH 
of their present efforts will be 
looked forward to with much i.rter- 



We note with especial interest that 
the School Directors of Lancaster Co. 
have elected as their president, our 
townsman, Mr. A. G. Heisey. 



Among the former students vho 
siUunrlet the Elizabeth town Iovefeast 
(mi Sunday, we noU' ihe following: 
W. p; Glasmire, CUM, Frank Car- 
per, Mary Bitner and Fannie Zug 

Marriages 

Fry-Stauffer — The friends of Clay- 
ton Fry will be interested to learn 
that he was married on May 14th, to 
Miss Esther G. Stauffer, from the vi- 
cinity of Mastersonville. Mr. Fry is 
building a new house near the Col- 
lege which he and his wife expect 
to occupy sometime during the year. 

Minnich-Longenecker — On May 4, 
Elmer Minnich, of Lititz and Miss 
Anna Longenecker were married at 
the home of the bride's parents, near 
Annville, Pa. 

Prof, and Mrs. Ober attended the 
wedding and enjoyed the wedding 
dinner very much. 

The Agricultural Department 

The College orchard is beginning to 
present a pleasant appearance and in 
one more year some of the peach 
trees will be in bearing condition. 
The strawberry patch is white with 



blossoms and by the time the next is- 
sue of the Times reaches you we 
hope to report incidents relating to 
the first harvest. 

We are glad to report that one of 
the staunch friends of the College. 
Elder John Schlosser of Schoeneck. 
Pa., donated 3150 strawberry plants 
and on Saturday, May 6, some thirty 
of the students assisted Prof. H. K. 
Ober in planting these plants. 

This presented a lively scene. 
Some were carrying water, others 
dropping plants, others watering the 
plants which had been carefully laid 
in with the roots well spread, while 
others closed the ground around the 
watered plants. When the work was 
finished all those who helped were 
treated to lemonade and cake by our 
efficient matron and her assistant. 
If the weather is favorable we ex- 
pect to have a large crop of berries 
by next spring. 

The raspberries, blackberries and 
currants, which were planted last 
spring are also blossoming and prom- 
ise a beginning crop. The grape 
vines are showing fine growth. 

Animal husbandry is receiving 
some attention. A hog stable and 
chicken house have been built. Elder 
E. M. Wenger is donating one dozen 
pullets. Brother George W. Henry 
has donated a trio of fine White 
Rocks. 

The boys and girls are taking a 
fine interest in the work of this de- 
partment and we hope tor mui 
to result from the efforts in this 
direction. 



Alumni Notes 

Ho! all ye who belong to the Alum- 
ni Association! Come ye to the exer- 
cies "i Commencement week, beglo- 

June 11. Surely no loyal Alumnus 
will be missing on Alumni day. at 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



least. This is to be a time of good 
cheer and fellowship and the occa- 
sion will not be complete without 
you. You dare not, you must not, 
you will not be absent. 

The executive committee is busy, 
a good program has been arranged 
and plans for the supper are being 
laid. A movement is on foot to 
make a slight change in the time and 
place of holding it. 

Six members of the Association 
have continued their work here this 
year and are prospective graduates, 
Miss Gertrude Hess and Messrs. H. 
K. Eby, J. E. Myers, L. D. Rose, R. 
W. Schlosser and L. W. Leiter. 

G. H. Light, '05, has recently been 
elected assistant Sunday School Sec- 
reary of the Eastern District of 
Pennsylvania. 

Mrs. Frank Groff (nee Stayer), '04 
spent some time lately with her par- 
ents in Bedford County. Having been 
ill she went home to recruit. Her 
health is greatly improved. 

L. M. S. 



Locals 

Commencement — June 15. 

Our most popular fruit — strawber- 
ries. 

Tennis enthusiasts are not daunted 
by the increasing heat. 

College Hill has been touched by 
the magic wand of Spring. 

Our most welcome guests — the 
birds. 

Let us encourage them to bring 
their friends by building houses for 
them on the campus and making the 
dreamed of lake, a reality. 

The comfortable seats placed un- 
der the shade trees of the campus 
are much appreciated. 

Have you seen the new building? 
It is awaiting the arrival of poultry 
and swine. 



Mr. Danner and Miss Wise showed 
the greatest stomach capacity for the 
refreshing lemonade with which they 
were treated while planting the 
strawberry plants. 

Six flower beds have recently been 
dug. Geraniums have been planted 
on two and canna bulbs set in the 
others. 

The use of two lawn mowers on 
the College campus enhances the ap- 
pearance of the place. 

A recent interesting base ball game 
between the Seniors and Juniors re- 
sulted in a score of 2 6-10 in favor 
of the Juniors. A game between 
the Boarding and Day students was 
decided by the score of 15-5 in favor 
of the Boarders. M. M. 



Misses Elizabeth and Sarah Degler, 
of Royersford, Pa., were welcome vis- 
itors at the College on Friday and 
Saturday, May 5 and 0. They attend- 
ed the District Meeting at Manheim 
and from there came over to Eliza- 
bethtown to visit friends at the Col- 
lege. Miss Elizabeth has recently 
closed her work as teacher of the 
Fernwood School located in Limerick 
Township, Montgomery County, one 
and a fourth miles from her home 
in Royersford. 



Rufus Bucher with his wife and 
two children, Caleb and Mary, at- 
tended the Lovefeast services held in 
Elizabethtown Church on Sunday, 
May 11. He preached during the 
forenoon services on, "Watch and 
Pray, lest you Enter into Tempta- 
tion." 

His second child. Martha, was tak- 
en care of by Aunt Mary during its 
parents stay in Elizabethtown. Mary 
the third child, is now eight weeks 
old. 



Those who were students here in 
1905 will remember Samuel L. Groff 
who was student from Bareville. Af- 
ter leaving school, he took unto him- 
self a better half, in the person of 
Nora Kilhelfner, of Ephrata, Pa. 
Samuel is now the father of Landes 
Groff, a baby boy who came to their 
home Friday, May 12. 



Religious Appointments 

Regular Preaching Services: — 

April 23, 7.30 p. m. — Sermon by 
C. S. Miller. Subject: "Evi- 
dences of the Existence of a 
True God." 

April 30, 10.00 a. m. — Sermon by 
Prof. J. G. Meyer. Subject: 
"Christian Growth." Text Ps. 
92:12. 

May 7, 7.30 — Sermon by R. W. 
Schlosser. Subject: "Abiding in 
Christ." Text, John 15:4. 
Christian Workers Meeting: — 

April 2 3 — Led by Levi Zeigler. 

May 7 — Led by Gertrude Hess. 
Mid-Week Prayer Meeting: — 

April 2 6 — Led by Carrie Dennis. 

May 3 — Led by Mrs. W'ampler. 

May 10 — Led by Andrew Dixon. 
Bible Class: — 

Every Sunday at 8.15 a. m. 

Classes taught by Prof. Meyer and 
Miss Stauffer. 
Missionary Reading Circle: — 

Pres. — B. F. Waltz. 

Teacher — Miss Stauffer. 

Reading — Biographical Sketches 
and "Healing of the Nations." 



Hirsh & Bro. 

Centre Square, Next to City Ha 
LANCASTER, PA. 

Sole Agents for the Famous 
Michaels-Stern Ready-to 
Wear Suits and Overcoats, 
Men's Furnishings and Tail- 
oring. Plain Clothing a 
Specialty. Strictly one Price 
to All. 



The House of 
Good Clothes 

Signs of spring are in the air. 

Likewise the Fashions for Men's, 

Young Men's and Children's 

CLOTHING AND HATS 




Getting ready early is wise man's policy 
It doesn't pay you to wait until the best 
styles have been selected. You'll say, 
there's plenty for me to choose from. 
But why not make your selection from a 
lull assortment'.' You'll be better pleased. 
Suits, Hats and Furnishings are all 
here in the newest anil choicest spring 
styles. 

IF YOl' LOOK YOU'LL BUY 



S. M. Myers & Co. 

Clothing, Hats 

& Furnishings 

12 East King Street 

Lancaster - - Pa. 



I h © Book St o re ° n - falkenste™ 
Bibles, Books, g>tationer\>, (Post Garbs 



Mail orders receive prompt attent 



ELIZABETHTOWN 

ROLLER MILLS 

J. F. BINKELV, Propr. 

Manufacturer of Best Grades of 

FLOUR & FEED 

Use Binkley's Celebrated Mash Food 

It Makes Hens l^ay. 
ELIZABKTHTOWX, - PENNA. 



JOHN C. BERBERIAN 

Modern Shoe Repairing 
Work guaranteed and Prices right 

MANHEIM STREET 



Ice Lream Confectionery, Sodas of all kinds 
Mrs. S. HornaKus' Confectionery 



POORMAN'S BAKERY 

Choice Bread, Rolls and Cakes. 

HUMMELSTOWN STREET 



£. H. LEHMAN 



Co 



WOOD, GRAIN 
FLOUR, FEED 



At 



SEWER PIPE, 

ETC. * -J 

Telephone 
ELIZABETHTOWN, - PENNA. 



FURNITURE 



THE MOST COMPLETE AND UP- 
TO-DATE LINE IN THIS SECTION 
OF THE COUNTRY. 

F. C. FISHER 



ELIZABETHTOWN, 



A. W. MARTIN 

COAL, WOOD, GRAIN 
FLOUR and FEED 

Telephone 

ELIZABETHTOWN, - PENNA. 

S. G. HERSHEY 

Groceries, Dry 

Goods and 

Notions. 

ELIZABETHTOWN, - PENNA. 



S. P. ENGLE 



S. Market & Bainbrldge Sts. 



DRY GOODS, NOTIONS, FOOT- 
WEAR, CARPETS, LINOLEUMS 
AND OIL CLOTHS. 



ELIZABETHTOWN, PA. 



Jos. D. Hollinger, 

ROOFING & SPOUTING 
HOT AIR FURNACES 



BELL PHOKI 



Breeder of 

I riz^- Winning 

Light Brahmas 

Elizabethtown. Pa. 



Go To 

HERR'S BOOK STORE 

112-114 N. Queen St., Lancaster, Pa. 

— for — 

BOOKS AND STATIONERY 

PENNANTS PRINTING 



Bell, 9-5. Hours 8 to G 

DR. JEROME G. HESS 

DENTIST 

Hertzler Bldg. Elizabethtown Pa. 



AMERICAN FIELD AND POULTRY 
FENCE 

JOS. H. RIDER ca SON 



£. L. RENSEL 

General Blacksinithin? 
and Repair Work 
Horse-Shoeing a Specialty. 

Park St., Elizabethtown, Pa. 



J. RALPH GROSS 
THE BARBER 
Elizabethtown, - - Peni 



JNO. M. SHOOKERS 
WATCHMAKER AM) JEWELER 

5 yrs. with L. Weber & Son 

Lancaster, Pa. 

Elizabethtown, - - Pemia. 



Bell & Ind. Phones 

The Lancaster Mail Order House 

Dealers in 

New and Old Books 
East Orange St., Lancaster, Pa 

For All Kinds of 
FARMING IMPLEMENTS 

Go To 
Geise & McBride 

ELIZABETHTOWN. - PENNA. 

BISHOP'S STUDIO 
Photos of AH Styles. 

Framing Neatly Executed. 

Center Square, Elizabethtown. Penna. 



ELIZABETHTOWN 



Dental IParlors 



HKIXDKI.. Dentist. 



Up-To-Date Shoe Repairing 

We Guarantee You the Best Service 

and Materials 
s. K. Barnes A Son, South Market st. 

FIVE AM) TEN CENT STORE 

It is really wonderful what a few 
pennies will buy in our ."» and 10 
cent store and every article is useful 
about the house. Nothing in the 
Store la priced for more than 10c and 
from that down to lc. 
i:i.i/.\i.i:i h town. - i'i\w 



0. N. HEISEY 

Provisions, Groceries C& Choice Candies 



HEISEY BUILDING 



ELIZABETHTOWN, PENNA, 



A Complete Line of New and Up-To-Date 

STATIONERY 



THE HERALD BOOK STORE 



WEST HIGH STREET 



GET MY PRICES ON 

Building Material 

PAINTS, ETC. 
before purchasing. Will be 

pleased to quote on anything 
in the Hardware line. Kdi- 
son Phonographs, Sporting 

Goods, Kodak supplies, etc. 

GEO. A. FISHER 

ELI55ARETIITOWX, - PENNA. 



/. E. BELSER 

For Roofing, Spouting, Tin and 
Granite Ware, Milk Cans, Uadi- 
ators, Portable Furnaces, Granite 
Lisk Roasters in four sizes, or 
anv special orders in my line. 
Give me a trial. 



ELIZ\HETHTOWN. 



PENNA. 



SUBSCRIBE FOR 

OUR COLLEGE TIMSE 
50c. PER YEAR 

0, C. RENSEL 

Choice Bread, Rolls 
& Cakes of All Kinds 

Prompt Delivery. 

S. Market St. 

ELIZABETHTOWN, - PENNA. 



KUHN'S 

CHOICE BREAD AND 
CAKES 

Weddings and parties supplied 
with Fancy Cakes at short 
notice. South Market Street. 

ELIZARETRTOWN, - PENNA. 

Harry Miller 

Furniture & Undertaking 

Furniture Repairing & Upholstering 
Picture Framing 

Bell Phone 
Elizabethtown, - - Penna. 



G. WM. REISNER 

Manufacturing Jeweler, Class and 
Fraternity Pins, Pennants, Banners 



Lancaster, 



Penna. 



An early start, a steady pace, 
Is our way to win the race. 
We would advise those who can. 
Adopt a system, work the plan. 
Modern methods, nowadays, 
Are commendable in many ways 

AT NISSLEY'S 
LUNCH ANT) DINING ROOMS 

14-16 E. Chestnut St., Lancaster, Pa 



ELIZABETHTOWN COLLEGE FACULTY 



D. C. REBER, A. M. Pd. D., President 
Philosophy, Pedagogy, German. 

H. K. ODER, Pd. B., Vice President, 

Biological Science, Agriculture, 

Surveying. 
ELIZABETH MYER, M. E., 

Elocution and Grammer. 
B. F. WAMPLER, B. E., 

Director of Music, Voice Culture. 
FLORA GOOD WAMPLER, 

Piano, Organ, Harmony. 

J. G. MEYER, Pd. B., A. B., 

Mathematics, Physical Science, 
History. 

MARY E. MARKLEY, A. M., 

English, Latin and French. 

J. Z. HERR Prin. Commercial Dep't, 
Bookkeeping, Penmanship, Com- 
mercial Law. 



JACOB S. HARLEY, A. B., 

Geography, History and Civics 

LYDIA STAUFFER, 
English Bihle. 

LEAH M. SHEAFFER, Pd. B.. 

Piano, Organ, Drawing, Physi- 
cal Culture. 

R. W. SCHLOSSER, Pd. B., 
Latin and Algebra. 

ELIZABETH KLINE, 

Piano, English Branches. 

ANNA W. WOLGEMUTH, 

Shorthand and Typewriting. 

DAISY P. RIDER, Pd. B., 

(Absent on Leave.) 
LAURA I!. HESS, 

Sewing. 
ELD. S. H. IIERTZLER. 

Exegesis (Bible Term). 



Contents 



Alumni Notes .... 

Commencement Week 

Commercial Program - 

Class Day ..... 

Commencement Exercises 

Editorial ..... 

Exchauges - 

Faculty of lilll to 1912 

Final Examination of Pedagogical Seniors 

Locals ...... 

Marv Elizabeth Markley 

Music Program .... 

Responsibility of P.eing Educated 
School News .... 

The Keath ADgel - 

The s,wing Course of Kli/.ahethtown College 

Who Will Teach ... 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



Vol. VIII ELIZABKTHTOWN, PA., JULY, 1911. No. 10 

EDITORIAi STAFF : 

ELIZABETH MYER, Editor-in-Chief 

HOLMES FALKENSTEIN, Associate Editor WALTER F. ESHLEMAN, Exchanges 

LEAH M. SHEAFFER. Alumni New. MAZIE MARTIN, Locals 

B. F. WALTZ, Society News GERTRUDE MILLER, Stenographer 

R. W. SCHLOSSER, Business Manager 



Our College Times is published mi 
The paper will be sent contiuously to 
less notice to discontinue has been recei 
Report changes of address, and failur 
Terms : Fifty cents per year, 10 cent 
Entered at the Post Office at Elizabei 



, except in August and September, 
ubscribers, so as not to break their file: 

;ceive this paper regularly, to the Busi 

thly. 

«, Pa., as Second-Class Matter. April 19, 1909 



1 arrearages charged, 
Manager. 



ED1TOQIAL 

Fond farewells are spoken, and 
College doors are closed to almost 
all teachers and students until Sept. 
4th. 



Some who desire to shorten their 
program of studies for the year re- 
turn for the Summer Term of six 
weeks, which opens on July 3rd. 

Have you ceen our new catalogue? 
If not, a postal card with your ad- 
dress and request upon it, will bring 
you a copy. 

Farewell, sweet June! thy little 
race is run, thy first bright roses 
hang their drooping heads, but one 
by one new buds have opened in the 
sun, and not a link of beauty yet is 
lost. So in the wheaten fields that 
wave like golden seas, if one stalk 
withers through a blighted heart, its 
fellows closer crowd and hide its 
early grave, and no one but the Fath- 
er knows the spot. The strawberries 
have turned their soft cheeks to the 



light, and rich and luscious, ripened 
into red; and their abundant yield, 
like rose, like golden wheat, has 
failed not in the glory of the June. 
Our deeds, our acts of love, — oh, 
that they too have been unmarred 
by fading leaves of sad mistakes, or 
withered stalks of blighted trust, or 
stolen fruits that robbed our neigh- 
bor's store of joys! Oh. that in some 
sweet aftermath, our roses, grain and 
fruit may make for some tired heart 
a rest! — Ida Scott Taylor. 

Faculty of 1911 to '12 

As usual, a few changes occur in 
the Faculty for the coming year. 

Prof, and Mrs. Wampler who have 
organized and built up the Depart- 
ment of Music during the last seven 
years have decided to fill a similar 
position in Juniata College. 

Mary Elizabeth Markley who held 
the Professorship of Languages dur- 
ing the last two years has accepted 
a position in a female institution in 
the South. 

Elizabeth Kline who has assisted 
in music and English branches ex- 



OLTt COLLEGE TIMES 



pects to take up studies elsewhere 
with the view of preparing for bet- 
ter services in life. 

Prof. H. K. Ober who during the 
past year in addition to teaching 
Agriculture and Biological Sciences 
was Financial Secretary for the in- 
stitution, will devote all his time 
next year as a member of the Fac- 
ulty giving his attention to the de- 
velopment of the Agricultural Course 
and also teaching Mathematical sub- 
jects in addition. 

Elizabeth Meyer, the preceptress, 
will continue her work along the 
same line as heretofore with the ex- 
ception of Elocution which will be 
taught by Miss Frances Miller, of 
Bethany, Nebraska. 

Miss Miller is a graduate of Co- 
lumbia School of Expression of Chi- 
cago, and for the past year had 
charge of the department of Physical 
Culture and Expression in Cotner 
University, Neb. Miss Miller will 
have charge also of Physical Culture 
in Elizabethtown College next year 
teaching both the ladies and gentle- 
men. 

Prof. J. G. Meyer will continue to 
have charge of Physical Science, 
Mathematics and Greek. He will at- 
tend the Summer Session of Columbia 
University. Next year he will teach 
College Physics and Chemistry to 
Classical students and it is expected 
that the equipment in the Physical 
Laboratory will be greatly increased. 
Prof. Meyer is also preceptor of the 
College and has done very excellent 
work in this capacity as well as in 
the capacity of teacher. 

Prof. Herr will remain in charge 
of the Commercial work and has 
raised the standard in his department 
for the coming year. He has out- 
lined a three year Commercial Course 
and it is hoped that the address of 



Dr. Rowe during Commencement 
Week will lead a number of students 
to decide to stay in school long 
enough to finish this course in high- 
er commercial education. Prof. 
Herr will again be assisted by Miss 
Anna Wolgemuth as teacher of 
Shorthand and Typewriting. 

Miss Laura B. Hess will continue 
her work as teacher of Sewing. 
Fourteen students during the past 
year received instruction in Sewing 
and Pattern Drafting and it is hoped 
that many more students will avail 
themselves of this practical work 
next year. 

Prof. J. S. Harley has also decided 
to remain as teacher next year. He 
has proved himself to be a valuable 
and dependable member of the Fac- 
ulty and will teach German, Math- 
ematics, and Civics next year. 

Miss Lydia Stauffer has done very 
acceptable teaching in the Bible De- 
partment during the past year and 
will continue to be in charge of this 
department the coming year. Miss 
Stauffer contemplates continuing her 
studies during the summer vacation. 
She has revised the English Bible 
Course as is seen in the new cata- 
logue. 

Although several of the most effi- 
cient teachers are not returning next 
year, the Management is glad to be 
able to announce that the College 
has several capable and competent 
alumni who have been asked to fill 
these vacancies. 

Miss Leah Sheaffer who finished 
two literary courses and Piano Course 
in Elizabethtown College and has 
taught music in the same institution 
for three years will be the leading 
teacher in instrumental music, as 
Mrs. Wampler's successor. Miss 
Scheaffer is fully competent both 
from a pedagogical and from an ar- 



OUK COLLEGE TIMES 



/ 



tistic stand-point to receive this pro- 
motion. 

Miss Katie Miller, a graduate of 
Blue Ridge College in the Music 
Teacher's Course, who has taught 
music in her Alma Mater for two 
years and been director of music in 
Daleville College for two years, will 
be the director of vocal music and 
voice culture in Elizabethtown Col- 
lege the next session. Miss Miller 
comes highly recommended by her 
teachers, among whom may be named 
Prof. Naff, Prof. Hildebrand, and Dr. 
Unseld. In this way the Management 
has provided experienced and skill- 
ful teachers to continue the work 
next year and should the work justi- 
fy it, assistance in music will be pro- 
vided later on. It is the aim of the 
Management to continue to uphold 
the high standard of excellence es- 
tablished in this department. 

Prof. R. W. Schlosser who was re- 
cently graduated from Ursinus Col- 
lege with the degree of Bachelor of 
Arts and who has completed his stud- 
ies to receive the degree of Master 
of Arts at the same institution next 
year, has been selected to be Miss 
Markley's successor as teacher of 
English, Latin, and French. Prof. 
Schlosser has been graduated from 
Elizabethtown College in the English 
Scientific Course, in the Pedagogical 
Course, and at the recent commence- 
ment, in the Classical Course. He 
has enjoyed the instruction of Miss 
Markley and Dr. Smith of Ursinus 
College in English, Latin, and French 
for several years and with his four 
years' experience in teaching in this 
school along with his studies he is 
well qualified to assume the duties 
of this position. 

Prof. W. K. Gish who has also fin- 
ished three courses in this school, 
graduating in the Pedagogical Course 



in 1910, having also taught two 
years in the Commercial Department 
of his Alma Mater, has filled a posi- 
tion in Alaska in the employ of the 
United States Government. His 
work was of an educational charac- 
ter and has been very acceptable as 
may be judged from the fact that he 
has been offered a salary of two 
thousand dollars next year if he will 
continue his work in Alaska. Prof. 
Gish has, however, decided to return 
to Elizabethtown College in Septem- 
ber to enter upon the Classical 
Course. This is a notable recogni- 
tion of the work of this school which 
is highly gratifying to the College 
authorities. Prof. Gish will have 
charge of the gentlemen in Memorial 
Hall and also teach United States 
History. 

Miss Mazie Martin will teach Or- 
thography, and aims to complete the 
Pedagogical Course in the Class of 
1912. 

Charles E. Resser, a graduate of 
Blue Ridge College and of Millers- 
ville State Normal School, who has 
completed his Freshman year In 
Franklin and Marshall College will 
also enter Elizabethtown College as 
a student in the Classical Course. 
Mr. Resser has a family of wife and 
one child and will occupy some rooms 
in the first story of Memorial Hall. 
He will teach some classes in Geog- 
raphy, General History, and Math- 
emathics in addition to his studies, 
and will be the curator of the Col- 
lege Museum. 

The outlook for next year is very 
encouraging. In the College work 
will be two sophomores and three or 
four freshmen, and besides a number 
of College preparatory students, who 
will finish this course the coming 
year. Notwithstanding the loss of 
several teachers, the Faculty for next 



OUK COLLEGE TIMES 



rear will be fully capable to maintain 
the high standard of class room in- 
struction that has been set during 
the last few years and which has 
heen recognized by several reputable 
colleges and distinguished educators. 
D. C. REBER. 

Final Examination of Pedagogical 
Seniors 

On June 5, the Senior Class in the 
Pedagogical Course was examined in 
Pedagogy and certain literary studies 
by a committee of examiners consist- 
ing of Supt. L. E. McGinnes, of 
Steelton, Pa.; and Superintendent C. 
W. Stine, of York County. The class 
consisted of two gentlemen and one 
lady and all attained to an average 
of above ninety per cent. The ex- 
aminers were unanimous in their 
praise for the attainments of the 
class in the knowldege of the teach- 
ing art, and the influence of these 
educators as friends of the school 
will, no doubt, in the future do much 
to encourage young people to take 
this course in our institution. 

Superintendent McGinnes said, 
"You have a strong course in Peda- 
gogy. It contains as much Pedagogy 
as is given by the University of Penn- 
sylvania in their course in Pedagogy 
to graduate students. There ought 
to be more young people taking this 
course. Your graduates are capable 
of taking charge of a first-class High 
School. I shall be glad to say a word 
for your school at any favorable op- 
portunity." Supt. Stine corroborated 
some of these statements, and gave 
one of the class who is a native of 
York County, a professional certifi- 
cate without examination, on which 
will be placed not only the common 
school branches but all of the high- 
er branches in the course. He fur- 
ther agreed to grant professional cer- 



tificates to students from this county 
in the future who complete this 
course. A graduate in this course 
in the class of 1908 has been teach- 
ing a High School in York County 
and it is due to the commendable rec- 
ord of this alumnus that superintend- 
ent Stine gives us this assurance of 
confidence in our students, especially 
those who complete this course. We 
feel that our school will have more 
prestige in York County than at any 
time heretofore. 

The subjects of the theses of the 
Pedagogical Class are as follows: Es- 
sentials of the School, by H. K. Eby; 
The Education of Woman, by M. Ger- 
trude Hess; An Ideal Education, by 
J. E. Myers: The Twentieth Century 
Educational Ideal, by Rev. S. P. 
Sumpman, of Weissport, Pa. Mr. 
Sumpman was a student of Eliza- 
bethtown College from 1902 to 1904, 
nearly completing the College Pre- 
paratory Course. He afterwards en- 
tered Albright College and completed 
his sophomore work in that institu- 
tion. During the year he Iils stud- 
ied the Pedagogical subjects of the 
course ana has taken special exam- 
inations on them. He is graduated 
with the Class of 1911 in the Peda- 
gogical Course. At present he holds 
the position of Pastor of the United 
Evangelical Church at Weissport in 
Northampton County, Pennsylvania. 



COMMENCEMENT 
WEEK 

Commencement Week 

Commencement week of 1911 was 
ushered in on College Hill with the 
Bacculaureate sermon on Sunday ev- 
ening. The graduates marched to 
the chapel in a body and occupied 
reserved seats near the pulipt Al- 
though the heat was intense the large 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



audience listened to the speaker with 
rapt attention. Rev. J. W. G. Hersh- 
ey, a member of the Board of trus- 
tees, was the orator of the occasion. 
In a simple, yet forceful and practic- 
al way he reminded the students of 
the real purpose of education and 
warned them against the mistakes 
often made by educated people. 

The subject of his remarks was 
"Servant and Service," based on 
Matt. 20:25 and Philip. 2:4-S. 

Bro. Hershey gave much excellent 
advice and pointed out the true aim 
of education. In short he said this: 
"The common idea among people to- 
day is to educate their children that 
they may get through the world eas- 
ier than they themselves did. This 
is an entirely mistaken idea. The 
true aim of education is to train for 
service. 

The men who have risen to author- 
ity and prominent positions have 
done so because of their service. 

The men who are willing to serve 
need not seek popularity. It will 
seek them. The key to success is a 
willingness to serve others. 

But no life can be a real success 
unless it ends in Christ. We must 
have an humble, obedient serving 
heart. 

In every life there are two con- 
flicting tendencies. The most essen- 
tial thing is to keep under subjection 
ourselves and then only can we serve 
others. To the class especially, he 
said, "If your stay at college has not 
better qualified you and made you 
more willing to be of service to those 
with whom you associate, your work 
has been in vain. The truly great 
life is the life of service." 

He also warned the graduates not 
to be cruel critics of others but to 
find the holy grail as Sir Launfal 
did by doing deeds of love and kind- 



ness at home. The music by the 
octette before and after the sermon 
was a much appreciated feature of 
the occasion. V. E. H. 

Music Program 

Despite most unfavorable weather, 
a fair-sized audience gathered in 
Heisey's Hall on Monday evening to 
hear the annual Music program. The 
audience proved that Elizabethtown 
knows how to appreciate good music 
and the program proved that the 
Music Department does not fail to 
meet expectations. The pleasure of 
the occasion was lessened only by 
the fact that it was the farewell ap- 
pearance of Prof, and Mrs. Wampler 
in a music program before the people 
of Elizabethtown. As they leave for a 
new field of labor they take with 
them the best wishes of every music 
lover of this community. 

The program was as follows. 
Part I 

Chorus, "Come to the Gay Feast," 
R. E. DeReef; Piano Duet, "II Trov- 
atore," Blake, Mrs. Wampler, Miss 
Sheaffer; Vocal Solo. "If God so 
Clothe the Grass," Bischoff. Mr. 
Wampler; Piano Solo, "Waltz Bril- 
liante," Englemann, Miss Smith: 
Piano Trio. "Jubel Overture, Weber 
Mrs. Wampler, Misses Kline and 
Sheaffer: Vocal Solo, "Deep in the 
Mine." Jude, Mr. Ebersole; Piano 
Solo, "Invitation to the Dance," Web- 
er. Mr. Hollinger; Chorus. "Hail, Or- 
pheus. Hail," R. E. DeReef. 
Part II 

Chorus, "The Heavens are Tell- 
ing." Haydn: Piano Quartet, "E Flat 
Symphony," Mozart, (a) Minuet; (b) 
Finale. Mr. Hollinger, Miss Smith, 
Mr. Olweiler. Miss Dennis: Vocal Soli 
(a) Meditation, Op. 43, Schoebel: (b) 
Resignation, Chaminade. Miss Kline; 
Piano Quartet, March (Faust), Gou- 



OLE COLLEGE TIMES 



nod, Mrs. Wampler, Miss Sheaffer, 
Mr. Hollinger, Miss Kline; Vocal 
Scherzo, "Snow," Parker, Miss Leh- 
man; Piano Solo, "Erato," Combs, 
Miss Withers; Piano Quartet, "Poet 
& Peasant," F von Suppe, Mrs. Wam- 
pler, Miss Sheaffer, Mr. Hollinger, 
Miss Kline; Hallelujah Chorus, (Mes- 
siah), Handel. 

Commercial Program 

The Commercial program was en- 
joyed by a large audience in the 
Chapel on Tuesday evening. The 
rostrum was beautifully decorated 
with class colors and ornamental 
plants and the program was business 
like throughout. 

Elder S. H. Hertzler, of the Board 
of Trustees, opened the exercises 
with an invocation. 

Music was then furnished by the 
male quartette. 

Miss Rhoda Markley then gave an 
oration entitled, "Profit and Loss." 
She showed that profit and loss is 
the fundamental principle of all 
business and successful business Is 
impossible without a knowledge of 
this important principle. 

Miss Elma Brandt followed with 
a recitation entitled "Kentucky 
Belle." 

The next speaker, Miss Irene Wise, 
gave an oration entitled "The Call 
and the Answer." She said that the 
business world is calling louder than 
ever for able, qualified young men 
and women and we can not hope for 
responsible positions unless we pos- 
sess good character and thorough 
training. 

The Ladies' Quartette followed 
with appropriate music. 

The address by Dr. H. M. Rowe 
of Baltimore was full of wit and 
wholesome, practical advice. A re- 
port of this address will be given on 



another page of this issue. 

Class Day 

The class of 1911 rendered a most 
interesting Class Day programme in 
the College Chapel which was filled 
to overflowing with people who 
awaited the treat in store for them. 
The following programme was then 
rendered: 

1. Music. 

2. Address — Ralph W. Schlosser. 

3. History — Lilian Falkenstein. 

4. Poem — Lewis D. Rose. 

5. Music. 

6. Presentation of Memorial — 

Tillman H. Ebersole. 

7. Declamation — Isaac Wampler. 

8. Prophecy — Henry K. Eby. 

9. Class Song. 

The musical talent of the class 
was displayed in that two selections 
of music out of three were written by 
different members of the class. If the 
class remain as loyal to the school 
as they declared by the class song, 
Elizabethtown College will ever be 
honored and praised by the members 
of 1911 class. 

The president's address contained 
many wise and helpful suggestions. 

The Class History proved that the 
historian noted long since the pe- 
cularities of the different dispositions 
and habits of the individual mem- 
bers. 

The declamation and prophecy 
were thoroughly enjoyed. The grand 
future for these young people as 
portrayed by the prophecy if fulfilled 
will lead to an endless fame for their 
Alma Mater. 

These young men and women de- 
serve to be highly commended for the 
presentation to the College Library 
of a complete set of Shakespeare's 
works in 40 volumes. We believe 
this is a token of their appreciation 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



for what Elizabethtown College has 
done for them during their stay 
with her. 

REBEKAH SHEAFFER. 
(Following are the songs rendered 
on Class Day.) 

College Days 
I. 
Elizabethtown, to thy fair name, 

We'll always sing this song, 
That everyone may learn thy fame; 

For thy success we long. 
Hail! fairest Alma Mater, hail! 
None doth thy noble worth sur- 
pass, 
Thy fame shall reach hill, plain, and 
vale, 
Through us, the Senior Class. 
II. 
When far from school 'mid work and 
strife, 
Yet still we'll praise thy name; 
We'll sing the joys of College life, 

Thy glory and thy fame. 
Then in these Halls of Fame we'll 
raise 
Our banners gay, yes gay and 
bright, 
For we're a loyal class always. 
And Orange and Black's alright. 
III. 
Our College high ideals doth hold, 

This is our motto then, — 
To "Educate for service" 
To all our fellow men. 
Then on this Class Day ever dear, 

Our voices we will raise. 
And sing the song that brings us near 
To our old College days. 

Words by Lilian Falkenstein. 
Music by M. Gertrude Hess. 



ness 
As we say our last good-bye. 
Though friendships can never be 

broken, 
Though we sail to a far distant land, 
For our Alma Mater has cherished 
And nurtured this bright joyous 

band. 

For years we have toiled here un- 
ceasing, 
As we labors and lessons pursued; 
Our teachers have earnestly helped 

The difficult problems to prove. 

Our trials were mingled with pleas- 
ure 

As we greeted the dawn of the day; 
'These halls have re-echoed with 
laughter, 

Which brightened life's toilsome way 

Fond memories shall ever linger, 
Of the bright school days now past. 
How fleeting the songs of gladness! 
Such joys, we know, cannot last. 
The cares of life thrust upon us, 
Seem heavy and hard to bear, 
But "Fidelity and Justice" will ever 
Banish all thought of care. 

While we stand on the threshold of 

life, 
And look into the future so wide, 
May we ever look unto the Father 
To help us and lead us, and guide 
Our foot-steps in pathways of duty. 
That we some poor wanderer may 

save; 
May our lives be of service and beau- 
ty, 
To the One who all victory gave. 



Class Song 

We greet you, dear friends and 

teachers, 
For the parting hour draws nigh; 
We crown thee with thought of kind- 



As the class of 1911, 

May we ever prove faithful and true. 

May we meet you, dear friends, in 

heaven; 
Until then, a fond adieu. 



10 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



Words and music by M. Gertrude 
Hess. 

Alumni Events 

The rest of the day the Alumni 
occupied the limelight and demon- 
strated their loyalty by greeting 
their Alma Mater and renewing 
old acquaintances on College Hill. 
The faculty, trustees and Class of 
1911 were their guests at the Alumni 
banquet, in the Library, at 4.30. The 
speeches, toasts and reminiscences 
of the sons and daughters of Eliza- 
bethtown College were enjoyed not 
less than the choice refreshments 
and delicacies that loaded the tables. 
At 8.00 p. m: in the Chapel, they ap- 
peared in public with the following 
program: (Only those who were pres- 
ent can appreciate the high stand- 
ard and worth of each feature. 

Music Octette 

Address of Welcome, 

A. G. Hottenstein. '08 
Presentation of Class, 

Dr. D. C. Rieber. 

Music Ladies' Quartette. 

History of the Classes of 1903-'04, 
I. E. Shoop, '04 

Oration Geo. H. Light. '05 

Recitation, Floy S. Crouthamel, '10. 

Music Octette. 

Address J. F. Graybill, '07 

Music Ladies' Quartette 

Alumni Song 

(An adaptation by Miss Leah Sheaf- 

fer.) 

Hail! Hail! College true, 

Colors, gray and blue, 
Bles't home, the dearest, 

Old E'town, the fairest! 
shall loyalty reign. 

O'er thy grand domain 
College of splendor. 
Ml glory to thee! 



Pow'r and might attemd her sons of 

valor; 
Foes, beware! Our College we'll de- 
fend! 
O'er this home of peace and freedom 
Honor's banner e'er shall wave. 

Hurrah! 
Then hail! Our College true and 
grand, 
Led on by God's own hand 
Thrice hail to thee! 
Our College, grand and true. 
We plight our faith to you! 
All Hail! 

On Saturday evening, June 8, the 
Homerian Literary Society appeared 
before the critical public with its first 
regular program. Many Keystoners 
and members of the faculty gave in- 
spiration and encouragement to the 
Homerians by their presence in the 
audience. The officers of the evening 
were Pres., C. M. Neff: Sec, Gertrude 
Hess; Critic. Dr. Reber: Chaplain. 
Prof. J. G. Meyer; Sergeant-at-arms, 
B. F. Waltz. The program rendered 
was as follows: — 
Instrumental Solo. M. Gertrude Hess 

Speaker's Address C. M. Neff 

Essay Martha Martin 

Debate, Resolved that reciprocity 

with Canada is desirable. 
Affirmative, L. D. Rose, 

Negative, R. W. Schlosser 

Vocal Duet. Misses Kline & Sheaffer 

i hi, Value of Art in Education 

Daisy Rider 

rth While." 

Miss Markley 

Critic's Remarks D. C. Reber 

Adjournment. 

Commencement Exercises 

Commencement Day. 1011. dawned 
with lair weather and eager antici- 
pations of the day's events. 

The day seemed destined to be- 
come memorable not only because it 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



marked the climax of the year's work 
but because Elizabethtown College 
was about to become a college in fact 
as well as in name and confer de- 
grees on the first graduates in the 
College Course. 

The Chapel was rn&de attractive by 
a profusion of potted plants taste- 
fully arranged on the rostrum. At 
9.00 o'clock the Trustees, faculty, 
and graduates appeared in a body be- 
fore the large audience and occupied 
the seats reserved for them. Dr. Reb- 
er took his place in the chair as pre- 
siding officer. 

The invocation was conducted by 
Elder John Schlosser, of Schoeneck, 
Pa., after which the chorus class sang 
a selection entitled "Make a Joyful 
Noise." 

Mr. L. D. Rosa then delivered an 
oration entitled '-The Greatest Genius 
of Modern Times." He paid a tribute 
to the german poet Goethe as the 
greatest genius of modern times and 
ended with a plea that we may have 
more noble men of the Goethe type. 

"The Nation's Curse" was then dis- 
cussed by Mr. F. H. Ebersole. He 
dwelt largely upon the evil economic 
effect liquor has upon our country 
and the physiological effect upon man 
Secondly, upon the part it plays in 
the political affairs of the country 
and especially in our own state legis- 
lature, where it is said liquor is fur- 
nished free secretly, by dealers, for 
our legislators. And lastly, the ef- 
fect on Christianity in our Nation. 
He ended by savin? that the abolish- 
ment of the use of liquor is only a 
question of will and not an impos- 
sibility. 

The audience was then taken back 
by Miss Nora L. Reber to the time 
when the log cabin instead of the 
mansion was the home of the Ameri- 
can, and the spinning wheel the care 



of the woman. The thought is ex- 
pressed in the following extract: 
Be a woman! On to duty! 
Raise the world from all that's low; 
Place high in the social heaven 
Virtue's fair and radiant bow; 
Lend thy influence to each effort 
That shall raise our natures human; 
Be not a fashion's gilded lady. — 
Be a brave, whole souled, true woman 

Another selection entitled "Wait 
Thou Only Upon the Lord" was 
sung by the chorus class after which 
Mr. I. S. Wampler traced the develop- 
ment of music in the schools of 
America and emphasized the educa- 
tional and religious value of music. 
He also pleaded strongly that more 
attention should be paid to music in 
the public school. 

Mr. H. B. Longenecker. the first 
graduate of this school in the Agri- 
cultural department gave a splendid 
discussion of the claims of the farm; 
the effect of the influence of nature 
upon the plastic mind and that these 
charms have a tendency to lead to a 
purer and nobler life. 

The next oration was given by Miss 
Mamie Keller on "The Power of the 
Press." She spoke of the three great 
factors of influence in every man's 
life viz. — home, school and church. 
While these are probably the more 
influential in the adulescent period, 
the press is undoubtedly the greater 
factor in more advanced or political 
age. The press is all — powerful in 
swaying public opinion morally, poli- 
tically and educationally. 

The oration on "Ideal Citizenship" 
by Mr. H. K. Eby gave a clear cut 
idea of what a true citizen should be. 
His great plea was that every Amer- 
ican must be educated mentally, mor- 
ally and physically in or. J er to attain 
ideal citizenship. If this were so 
there would be no use for jails and 



12 



OUK COLLEGE TIMES 



court-houses. People would know 
and respect the right. "Oh! fellow 
citizens let us search for the truth, 
pushing away onward and upward 
through adverse circumstances with 
a strong will until we have develop- 
ed a sound mind, a skillful hand, and 
a beautiful soul." 

Miss M. Gertrude Hess, the next 
orator spoke on "Choice vs Fate." 
She said that we have cast aside 
blind belief in fate and believe in- 
stead in freedom of the will. In 
other words each person is the ar- 
chitect of his own destiny and it is 
merely a matter of choice whether 
our lives are to be successful or not. 

Mr. Merton Crouthamel, in an ora- 
tion on "Canadian Reciprocity" up- 
held the idea that the U. S. needs 
protection and that reciprocity with 
Canada will be a disadvantage to the 
U. S. in the end. The kind of reci- 
prcity that is wanted in the U. S. Is 
reciprocity between the factory and 
farmer, between the North and South 
between the East and West; and last- 
ly among ourselves. Only when this 
has been accomplished will business 
in the U. S. nourish to the greatest 
extent and in harmony with divine 
laws. 

Mr. Jacob E. Myers, in an oration 
on "Weaklings of Society" portrayed 
the miseries and woes of society very 
forcefully. The fact that there are 
so many physical, intellectual and 
moral weaklings in the world is 
largely due to the indecisive action 
and improper conduct of the parents, 
teachers, and our companions. Many 
of the weaknesses of the present age 
are due to hereditary influences 
which are only a result of a weak 
will. The man who cannot deny him- 
self drink, tobacco, and other lux- 
uries and vices has a weak will and 
the result is that not only he. but 



his children and the community and 
even the nation will sufTer and do 
suffer. 

The Chorus Class then rendered in 
a most creditable manner the Halle- 
lujah Chorus of Handel's Messiah. 

Miss Lilian Falkenstein took as 
her subject, "America, the Melting 
Pot" and said that America is com- 
posed of the best blood of many na- 
tions. She spoke of the great debt 
we owe to the foreigner and made 
a plea that we should respect the im- 
migrant and help him to become a 
worthy, patriotic American. 

The next orator, Mr. Francis L. 
Olweiler, spoke on, "The Value of 
a College Education." He said that 
a college education is the only com- 
plete education and said that its pur- 
pose is to free the young man or 
woman from ignorance, narrowness, 
and superstition. He urged upon his 
hearers the importance of the college 
course in securing complete moral, 
physical, and intellectual develop- 
ment. 

The last oration was given by Mr. 
R. W. Schlosser. His theme was 
"The Complexity of Life." He trac- 
ed the development of man through 
the hunting and fishing, pastoral, 
agricultural, handicraft and industri- 
al stages. It is in the latter that 
man is struggling at present. As the 
complexity of life increases man be- 
comes more and more like a slave. 
The fields of labor are so extensive 
that he buckles down to one thing 
and learns nothing else. Man Is 
therefore no longer free. We are 
guided by our ancestors and present 
conditions. We are living in an age 
in which the truly great are few, an 
age in which the call is for qualified 
men. We need men who are strong 
and courageous for the right, men 
who have the most tender respect 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



13 



for the aged, men who are forgetful 
of self and loyal to their country, 
men who have clear consciences and 
a profound reverence for God. 

The farewell to Trustees, Faculty, 
Students and Classmates was spoken 
with touching effect in the following 
words: 

Closing Words of Mr. Schlosser 

Another school year with its joys 
and perplexities has passed into his- 
tory and the hour has arrived when 
we must speak the parting word. 

Worthy trustees, we are proud to 
graduate from an institution found- 
ed on the principles of true educa- 
tion. This school will he a lasting 
monument to your lives. You have 
afforded us excellent opportunities 
and we sincerely extend to you our 
gratitude. Our efforts and prayers 
shall ever be for the success of our 
Alma Mater. May this institution 
under your fatherly care, triumph 
over besetting perils and be faithful 
to its motto: Educate for Service. 
Affectionately, as your children, we 
bid you farewell. 

And now, fellow students, we must 
break the tie that binds us as stu- 
dents, we part today, we hope our 
associations have been helpful, and 
that we may have inspired you to 
qualify yourselves for more efficient 
service. May you persevere in your 
work and be an honor to your insti- 
tution. Farewell. 

Members of the faculty, you shall 
ever occupy a cherished spot in our 
hearts. You have implanted in us 
ideals of true men and women and 
you have nobly assisted us in our 
labors. We extend to you our heart- 
felt appreciation of your patient, un- 
tiring, and helpful efforts in making 
us more useful men and women. We 
shall not, yes, cannot forget you, 
but must bid you farewell. 



Our beloved president, it pains our 
hearts to utter the parting word to 
you. You have been a father unto 
us and words cannot express our 
gratitude to you. You have planned 
the course of study for us and have 
thereby directed the course of some 
of our lives until time shall be no 
more. May our Heavenly Father 
guide you in your responsible call- 
ing and assist you in directing the 
coarse of our Alma Mater. Fare- 
well. 

Classmates, we too cannot remain 
together, but must go out into the 
field where duty calls. Only by the 
diffusion of light is darkness dispell- 
ed, and it is only by our separation 
as a class that our lights will be of 
the greatest service. So with our 
minds made richer, with our souls 
made larger, with our visions of life 
made clearer, and with our faith in 
God made stronger, let us go forth 
from these walls with undaunted 
courage to be a blessing to our Alma 
Mater and a servant for the Master. 
Farewell. 

Responsibility of Being Educated 

Pres. Reber's address to Class of 
1911 on Commencement Day 

Education is an unfathomable, in- 
exhaustible theme. Mankind ad- 
mires the man of great power or rare 
attainment whether it be the multi- 
millionaire, an official of honor, or a 
man with a long, broad and deep 
education. Yet little thought is be- 
ing given to consider the weighty re- 
sponsibility attached to these men 
of influence and power. 

The amount of responsibility of the 
educated man varies with the extent 
of his educational advantages, or the 
degree to which he is educated. We 
may speak of three degrees of edu- 
cation. First, there is the one — di- 



14 



OUE COLLEGE TIMES 



mensional education. This may be 
described as having length, without 
breadth or depth. It is one sided, 
narrow and selfish. It is either whol- 
ly an education of the hand or of the 
head, either solely physical or man- 
ual, or intellectual. The pugilist, 
the handicraftsman and the scholar 
are examples of this kind of educa- 
tion. In this stage of education, 
knowledge is unorganized, undigest- 
ed, and consequently puffs up its pos- 
sessor and is of little use to him. "A 
little learning is a dangerous thing." 
Elizabethtown College does not stand 
for this kind of an education. 

In the second place, we have a 
two-dimensional education. This 
may be characterized as having both 
length and breadth. It is an educa- 
tion of the body as well as of the 
mind. It affords a manumental 
training, and its products are know- 
ledge and power. Power is the re- 
sult of organized knowledge. The 
preparatory courses of this school 
may be said to furnish a two-dimen- 
sional edu 

The education that is desirable and 
worth while is a three-dimensional 
education. It possesses length, 
breadth and depth. Length stands 
for knowledge, breadth for power, 
and depth for skill and efficiency. 
It is an education of the whole man 
three-fold being — body, mind, 
and soul, or baud, head and heart. 
It yields the man of Christian cul- 
ture and character. It is the aim 
of this college to enable each stu- 
dent to obtajn a comprehensive edu- 
cation of this third tpye. 

I its of the Class of 1911 thus 
d, let me remind you that 
your education is a trust given you 
that it may be used in the service 
of God and humanity. Having re- 
ceived much, mueh of you will be 



required. You are young people of 
promise who are expected to "make 
good," to discbarge your debt to hu- 
manity. Are you going to discharge 
these social and moral obligations 
to your fellow man? Are you going 
to pay what your lives promise? You 
are responsible for the influence you 
exert on society consciously or un- 
consciously. You will some day have 
to give an account of your talents 
and your educational advantages and 
of the lives you live. Assuring you 
that larger opportunities will meet 
you and graver responsibilities rest 
upon you from this day forth, we 
hope that you will joyfully enter the 
arena of life! 

Dr. Reber, in the name of the Col- 
lege then presented the diplomas and 
certificates. 

Those graduated are as follows: 
Sewing Graduates 

Eva Brubaker, Anna Friday, Grace 
Gish, Mary Hess, Elizabeth Landis, 
Anna Hosier. Edna E. Leiter, Mrs. 
H. K. Ober, Ada Rutt. Fannie Sav- 
ior. 

Bible Coarse 

Emma S. Miller. 

Agriculture Course 

H. B. ' Longenecker. 

Music Teachers' (nurse 

I. S. w ampler 

Commercial Courses 

Advanced or Complete Commercial 
Rhoda Markley. H. L. 
Shcaffer. 

Stenography. — Elma Brandt. Alice 
Garber. Irene Wise. 

rrilth. 
KiikIMi Scientific Course 

Lilian Falkenstein. Mamie Keller, 
Nora L. Reber. 

I ollege Preparatory 

E. M. Crouthamel, T, H. Ebersole. 
F. L. Olweiler. 



OLE COLLEGE TIMES 



L5 



Pedagogical Course 

M. Gertrude Hess, H. K. Eby, J. 
E. Myers, S. P. Sumpman. 
Classical Course 

L. D. Rose, R. \V. Schlosser. 

The above program was inter- 
spersed with selections of music by 
quartettes and was closed by the 
singing of the class song of 1911. 



SCHOOL NEWS 



Prof. Ober, accompanied by his 
wife, greatly enjoyed attending the 
Annual Meeting of the Brethren at 
St. Joseph, .Mo. 

Prof. Isairh Oberholtzer, former- 
ly of this place, visited College Hill, 
on May 31. He will spend the sum- 
mer soliciting for the school with 
which he is at present connected — 
Daleville College. 

Profs. Meyer and Harley of the 
faculty, are improving their vacation 
by attending summer school at Co- 
lumbia University. 

We acknowledge with thanks the 
donation of a handsome pulpit bible 
by S. C. Miller. 

We also express thanks for the 
following: 

Sweet potato plants — Daniel Esh- 
elman, Rheems; Joseph Heisey, Jno. 
Gibble. 

Cabbage plants — Ralph Schlosser 

Tomato and cabbage plants — 
Mary Rider. 

Radishes — Mrs. Charles Booser. 

Chickens — Geo. Henry Hershey. 

Sweet Allysium— Mrs. S. B. Kief- 
fer. 

Geraniums — Mrs. Ebersole, Steph- 
en's Hill. 

The Agricultural Department has 



become justly popular because of the 
crop of luscious strawberries during 
commencement. Up to this date the 
College patch has produced 235 
quart boxes of strawberries. 

The campus looks like a green car- 
pet since the grass has been neatly 
trimmed. 

A force of painters have recently 
treated Dr. Reber's residence to a 
new coat of paint. 

Summer term begins July 3rd; 
Fall term, Sept. 4. 

Don't forget College Hill when 
planning to attend Annual Meeting 
next Spring. We are only eighteen 
miles from York. 

Alumni Xotes 

Every human being, no matter 
what his profession, encounters dark 
days as well as bright ones. This is 
also true of life in school. While the 
past year had some gloomy and try- 
ing days, yet it had many bright ones 
and the brightest of these were the 
days of Commencement week of 1911 

Many of the old friends and es- 
pecially Alumni of the School re- 
turned to their Alma Mater. Every 
class was represented during this 
week. The representatives were as 
follows: 

Class of 1903 — Lizzie M. Eby. 

Class of 1904— Mrs. Frank Groff, 
I. E. Shoop, S. B. Kiefer. 

Class of 1905 — J. G. Meyer, J. Z. 
Herr, Mrs. Lydia Buckwalter Heil- 
man, Mrs. Mary Hess Reber, Miner- 
va Stauffer, Mrs. Blanche Fisher 
Morgan, G. H. Light, Anna Diffen- 
baugh, Elizabeth Kline, J. H. Breit- 
igan, Ezra Lehman. 

Class of 1906— C. M. Neff, H. H. 
Nye, R. W. Schlosser. 

Class of 1907 — Will E. Glasmire. 



16 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



Susan Miller, Bruce Rothrock, J. F. 
Or ay bill, Mary Royer, Leah Sheaffer, 
Carrie Hess, P. B. Eshelman, R. W. 
Sehlosser, G. H. Light, Amos G. Hot- 
tenstein, Mrs. Stella Hoffer Buffen- 
myer, L. D. Rose. 

Class of 1908 — Amos Hottenstein, 
E. R. Ruhl, Gertrude Hess, Edith 
Martin, Daisy Rider, Lizzie Weaver, 

C. M. Neff, H. L. Smith, Orella Goch- 
nauer, Anna Wolgemuth, Martin 
Brandt. 

Class of 190 9 — Amos P. Geib, H. 
L. Smith, Stella Frantz, H. K. Eby, 
L. W. Leiter. Gertrude Miller, J. D. 
Reber, J. B. Ober, Mary Balmer, 
Viola Withers, Jennie Miller. 

Class of 1910 — Floy S. Croutha- 
mel, Kathryn Moyer, Daisy Rider, L. 

D. Rose, B. F. Waltz, Florence Mil- 
ler, Mary Myers, Olive Myers, Holmes 
Falkenstein, A. C. Hollinger, Lottie 
Becker, E. G. Diehm, Ray E. Gruber, 
Walter Eshelman, L. W. Leiter, M. 
Cecil Smith, W. E. Glasmire, Eliza- 
beth Kline, Leah M. Sheaffer. 

At the Alumni Supper held on 
Wednesday evening, Mrs. Morgan 
read a very fine and concise history 
of the Class of 1905. This was very 
much appreciated and enjoyed, es- 
pecially by the Class of 1905. 

What Do You Think of This? 

Just before the close of the Com- 
mencement program on Thursday 
morning occurred one of the most 
sensational incidents of the week. 
Pres. Sehlosser, of the Class of 1911 
announced that although they are/ 
between $7000 and $8000 in debt, 
the individuals of the class have 
pledged to the Alumni Endowment 
Fund, a total of $1750, 6 per cent, 
or the interest of which is to be paid 
yearly until the principal is paid. 
"What ought we not expect from 



people who are $8000 rich?" Mr. 
Sehlosser dramatically demanded. 

Alumni Notes 

The friends of Mr. Latshaw of 
Waynesboro, will read the following 
announcement with interest: — 

Mr. and Mrs. Daniel W. Hess have 
given in marriage their daughter, 
Elsie Mabel, to Mr. Chalmers Bixler 
Latshaw, on Tuesday the sixth of 
June, nineteen hundred and eleven, 
Waynesboro, Penna. 

The "At Home" card says: — 

At home after the fifteenth of June 
Grant and King Streets, Waynesboro, 
Penna. 

Mary Elizabeth Markley 

The following facts concerning 
Miss Markley's work and where- 
abouts for next year, we know will 
prove interesting to heFmany friends 
who regret so much that she will 
not be with us during the coming 
school year. 

She will teach in the Latin and 
English Departments of the Agnes 
Scott College located at Decatur, 
Georgia. This is one of the three 
Woman's Colleges of recognized 
standing in the South, the others be- 
ing "The Woman's College" of Balti- 
more and "The Randolph Woman's 
College" of Macon, Georgia. 

A friend of Miss Markley's of Co- 
lumbia University days. Miss Tubln, 
has been at the head of the German 
department in the Agnes Scott Col- 
lege for four years: and Miss Spang- 
ler, daughter of Ex-president Spang- 
ler of Ursimus College, an intimate 
friend of Miss Markley's. was a few 
years ago teacher In the Music de- 
partment of the same college. 

This college dating back to 1891, 
has recently received an endowment 



OUR COLLEGE TOILS 



17 



of $350,000 from the General Educa- 
tional Fund and from private sourc- 
es. It finds strong support in those 
who are Presbyterians in faith. 

The Faculty is constantly enlarg- 
ing, and the buildings are many and 
well-equipped. 

Who Will Teach? 

Among the students of Elizabeth- 
town College who have taken the 
county examination and have received 
schools are as follows: 

Deodate, Conewago Twp. — Nora E. 
Gruber, Bachmanville, Pa. 

Mapledale, Conewago, Twp. — An- 
na E. Gruber, Bachmanville, Pa. 

Hertzler's, Conewago Twp. — Ada 
M. Brandt, Elizabethtown, Pa. 

Milton Grove, Mt. Joy Twp. — 
Harry L. Ebersole, Elizabethtown, Pa 

Bellaire, Mt. Joy Twp. — 'Mary Dav- 
eler, Elizabethtown, Pa. 

Grandview, Mt. Joy Twp. — Mary 
Gish, Elizabethtown, Pa. 

Rockville, Mt. Joy Twp. — - Mamie 
Herr, Elizabethtown, Pa. 

Wheatland, Mt. Joy Twp. — Walter 
Herr, Elizabethtown, Pa. 

Northeastern, Mt. Joy Twp. — 
Ralph Meckley, Elizabethtown, Pa. 

Stumptown, Mt. Joy Twp. — Rebec- 
ca Shaeffer, Bareville, Pa. 

Cherry Hill, Mt. Joy Twp. — John 
Eshleman, Milton Grove. 

Mc.Kinley, Rapho Twp. — Howard 
Merkey. 

Newtown, Rapho Twp. — Andrew 
Dixon. 

Silver Springs, Secondary, West 
Hempfield Twp. — Daniel Shenk, Eliz- 
abethtown, Pa. 

Exchanges 

As we look over the exchanges of 
the past year we notice that there is 
an increase both in the quantity and 



quality of those of last year. This 
is the time of the year when the 
college magazines who have the real 
college spirit burst forth in the tri- 
umps of inter-collegiate debates, or- 
atorical contests, and athletics. 
Should not the victories of the" for- 
um" and the victories of the "arena" 
redowned to as much credit to the in- 
stitution while the student is in Col- 
lege as the battles he overcomes and 
the successes he meets redown to the 
honor of his Alma Mater when the 
student is away from college?. 

It is with pleasure that we ack- 
nowledge the following exchanges: — 
Albright Bulletin, College Campus, 
College Educator, College Rays, Col- 
lege Student, Juniata Echo, Friend- 
ship Banner, Bareville Leader, Lin- 
den Hall Echo. Philomathean Month- 
ly, Purple and Gold, Rays of Light, 
Red and Black, Hebron Star. Ursinus 
Weekly. 

"It is obvious, therefore, that the 
remedy for corrupt politics lies in 
the training of the individual. We 
must train our people so that they 
will develop a high political con- 
sciousness, and the great mass of 
evils in our system of government 
will be the natural sequence of poli- 
tical education. College Student. 

"Someone hit me with a base, cow- 
ardly egg the other day." 

"And what kind of an egg might 
that be?" 

"A base, cowardly egg, is one that 
hits you and then runs." 

Ex. 

"Do not ask if a man has been 
through college, ask if a college has 
been through him; if he is a walk- 
ing university." Chapin. 

"The fathers of our country honor- 
ed our flag by raising it up in the 
name of God on the battle-fields of 



the Revolution. The American flag 
has passed through clouds of smoke 
and dust, through storms of shot and 
shell, through scenes of fire and 
blood. It has been waving over land 
and sea. and today it is admired and 
loved by all loyal citizens because 
it is the emblem of truth and purity, 
and the representation of unity and 
liberty." Linden Hall Echo 

"Vne-ua however, has a greater 
mission than to show the world an 
example of military skill and prow- 
ess. She should solve some moral 
and political problems for herself 
and then carry the boon of Christian 
civilization and undefiled Christian- 
ity to the lands benighted by super- 
stition, paganism, and sin. If Ameri- 
ca refuses to perform her mission, is 
it not possible that in the destined 
westward march of civilization the 
sceptre may depart from the Aryan 
race and the final consummation of 
civilization be effected in the Orient, 
near the cradle of the race?" 

Albright Bulletin. 
W. F. E. 



Hold up your hearts for the truth 
and God will fill them with drops o 
love, as the cup of the violet is filled 
with the dews of Heaven. So shal 
you grow like an April violet, bios 
soming in the garden of God's world 
and refreshing the highways 
Life's beautiful spring. — Year Book 
of English Authors. 



Hirsh & Bro. 



Sole Agents for the Ft 
Michaels-Stern Head y-t o 
Wear Suits and Overcoats, 
Men's Furnishings and Tail- 
oring- 1 'Liiii Clothing a 
Specialty. Strictly one Price 
to All. 



The House of 
Good Clothes 

Signs of spring are in the air. 

Likewise the Fashions for Men's, 

Young Men's and Children's 

CLOTHING AND HATS 




Getting ready early is wise man's policy 
It doesn't pay you to wait until the best 
styles have been selected. You'll say, 
there's plenty for ine to choose from. 
But why not make your selection from a 
full assortment? You'll be better pleased. 
Suits, Hats and Furnishings are all 
here in the newest and choicest spring 
styles. 

IF YOl" LOOK YOU'LL BUT 



S. M. Myers & Co. 

Clothing, Hats 

& Furnishings 

12 East King Street 

Lancaster - - Pa. 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



The Death Angel 

It is with great sorrow that we 
chronicle the death of Elizabeth 
Longenecker, daughter of Mr. A. G. 
Longenecker, who is secretary of our 
Board of Trustees and a deacon in 
the Church of the Brethren in Eliza- 
bethtown. Elizabeth was a great suf- 
ferer, having been afficted for two 
years with a complication of diseases 
ending in a dilated heart and bright's 
disease of the kidneys. She breath- 
ed her last Monday, June 19th, at 
the home of her parents, on College 
Avenue, Elizabethtown. 

AVe remember Elizabeth as a mild, 
unobtrusive, rather angelic maiden of 
thirteen summers, the pride of her 
parents and a most congenial com- 
panion to cousins, schoolmates and 
friends in general. 

We extend to her parents and 
friends our sincerest sympathy and 
trust they will find much comfort in 
God's Word, and in the words of 
Longfellow as given below: — 

Resignation 

She is not dead, — the child of our 
affection, — 
But gone into that school 
Where she no longer needs our poor 
protection, 
And Christ himself doth rule. 

In that great cloister's stillness and 
seclusion, 
By guardian angels led, 
Safe from tempation, safe from sin's 
pollution, 
She lives, whom we call dead. 
Not as a child shall we again behold 
her: 
For when with raptures wild 
In our embraces we again enfold her, 

She will not be a child: 
But a fair maiden in her Father's 
Mansion, 



Clothed with celestial grace; 
And beautiful with all the soul's 
pansion 
Shall we behold her face. 



The Sewing Course of Elizabethtown 
College 

It is with pleasure that we state the 
fact that ten young people have com- 
pleted the course in plain sewing and 
pattern cuting the first year of its intro- 
duction. We hope this course will be- 
come very popular and will be taken by 
a large majority of lady students. We 
feel that parents would do well to urge 
their daughters to take up this course 
in connection with their scholastic work. 
We hope the time is not far distant that 
our girls in College will feel that it is a 
splendid accomplishment to be able to 
ply the needle successfully and effective- 
ly. By the time the present course as 
outlined is completed those, taking same 
will be able to take measurements, to 
draft patterns according to these meas- 
urements, to cut and construct garments. 
The way the course is planned it will 
make it possible to take this work two 
periods a week with a great deal of out- 
side practice work so that it can betaken 
as easily as music lessons. The college 
management hopes that many shall 
avail themselves of this opportunity 
during the coming year. 

A Glimpse of Miss Myer's Vacation 



Hvelv 



[U- A. 



rtainint; style herreturn home. 

Bareville, Pa., June 20, 1911. 
Dear Asso. Ed.— I left good old Eliza- 
bethtown at 7.30 last evening and 
reached my home at Bareville at !i 45. 
Our folks had already gone to their bed- 
rooms, but Kebekah, at whose bouse 
the trolley stops regularly, very kindly 
came out and helped across the road 
with my baggage to my home. Miss 
Olive Myers, who is visiting Kebekah, 
spoke to me from an upper window, so I 
was greeted very cordially. Mother 
came down from her bed-room, too, to 
welcome me. Todav 1 donned the garb 
of a house-keeper, carried the water for 
washing, turned the corn-sheller, corn- 
grinder, washed dishes, etc. I enjoyed 
the change in occupation immensely, 
and my appetite sharpend as I ate of 
the delicious food that mother's hand 
had prepared. 

Miss Elizabeth Mver. 



lh© Book otorc, n. falkenstein 
Bibles, Books, g>tationer\> f post (Larfcs 



M..il <>i<lers receive prompt att« 



ELIZABETHTOWN 

ROLLER MILLS 

3. P. BINKELV, Propr. 

Manufacturer of Pest Grades of 

FLOUR & FEED 

Use Blnkley's Celebrated Mash Food 

It Makes Hens Lay. 
ELIZABETHTOWN, - PENNA. 



JOHN C. BEKBERIAN 

Modern Shoe Repairing 
Work guaranteed and Prices right 

MANHEIM STREET 



Mrs. S. Hornafius' Confectionery 



POORMAN'S BAKERY 

Choice Bread, Rolls and Cakes. 

HUMMELSTOWN STREET 



E. H. LEHMAN 



Co 



SEWER PIPE, 
ETC. 



WOOD, GRAIN 
FLOUR. FEED 

Telephone 
ELIZABETHTOWN, - PENNA. 



FURNITURE 



THE MOST COMPLETE AND UP- 
TO-DATE LINE IN THIS SECTION 
OF THE COUNTRY. 

F. C. FISHER 



ELIZABETHTOWN, 



A. W. MARTIN 

GOAL, WOOD. GRAIN 
FLOUR and FEED 

Telephone 
ELIZABETHTOWN, - PENNA. 

S. G. HERSHEY 

Groceries, Dry 
Goods and 

Notions. 

ELIZABETHTOWN, - PENNA. 



Sn rilOl r d ry goods, notions, foot- 
r rSlhl r WEAR, CARPETS, LINOLEUMS 
i I I LIIMLL AND 0|L CL oTHS. 



Market & Bainbrid K e Sts 



ELIZABETHTOWN. PA. 



|-_ f^ LI mIIImmah Breeder of bei.l 'phone 

Jos. D. Holhnger, lriz Winning 

ROOFING & SPOUTING Light hrahm:is 

Eliza ibetkt own. Pa. 



HOT AIR FURNACHS 



Go To 
HERB'S BOOK STORE 

112-114 N. Queen St., Lancaster, Pa. 

— for — 

BOOKS AND STATIONERY 

PENNANTS PRINTING 



Bell, 9-5. Hours S to 

DR. JEROME G. HESS 

DENTIST 

Hertzler Bldg. Elizabethtown Pn. 



AMERICAN FIELD AND POCLTRY 

PENCE 

JOS. H. RIDER <& SON 



E. L RENSEL 

GenernI Blacksmithin^ 
and Repair Work 
Horse-Shoeing a Specialty. 

Park St., Elizabethtown, Pa. 



J. RALPH GROSS 

THE BARBER 
Elizabethtown, - - Prnnn. 



JNO. M. SHOOKERS 
WATCHMAKER AND JEWELER 

5 yrs. with L. Weber & Son 

Lancaster, Pa, 

Elizabethtown, - - Penna. 



Bell & Ind. Phones 

The Lancaster Mail Order House 

Dealers in 

New and Old Books 
East Orange St., Lancaster, Pa 



For All Kinds of 

FARMING IMPLEMENTS 

Go To 

Geise & McBride 

ELIZABETHTOWN', - PENNA. 



BISHOP'S STUDIO 
Photos of AH Styles. 

Framing Neatly Executed. 

Center Square, Elizabethtown, Penna. 
ELIZABETHTOWN 

IDental parlors 

S. J. HKIXDEL, Dentist. 







Up-To-Dati 


SI. 


te R 


{pairing 


\\ 


e 


Guarantee 


You 


the 


Sesl service 






and 


Material 


3 


s. 


K 


. Barnes & Son, 


South Market St. 



FIVE AM) TEN CENT STORK 

It is really wonderful what a few- 
pennies will buy in our ."> and 10 
cent Store an 1 every article is useful 
about the bouse. Nothing in the 
store is priced for more than 10c and 
from that down to lc, 
BLIZABETHTOWN, - PENNA. 



O. N. HEISEY 
Provisions, Groceries C& Choice Candies 



HEISEY KUILDING 



k.mzarktiitowx. pkxxa.